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Diana

ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2009
Dear Amy: I'm a happily married woman. Last weekend I went shopping with a single girlfriend, "Diana," whose dating (mis)adventures have involved men who've turned out to be interested only in the proverbial "one thing." We were shopping and enjoyed some friendly banter with the shopkeeper. I learned Michael was a landscape designer on the side and I got his number for a project I have in mind. My friend Diana flirted mildly, and he flirted back. We said a cheerful goodbye to him and then went to a nearby restaurant/bar, where I (easily)
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NEWS
September 2, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Derrick Meaden stands in front of Harrods most days dispensing service with a smile. He helps lost tourists, opens taxicab doors for shoppers and, if he's lucky, gets to usher some celebrity into Britain's biggest department store. But on Monday, the 30-year-old doorman in his pea-green uniform, white shirt and thin black tie looked like an undertaker at a wake. Solemn and almost motionless, he watched for hours as thousands of mourners filed to a book of condolences on a sidewalk table.
NEWS
September 6, 1997
Text of the address by Queen Elizabeth II in a live broadcast Friday from Buckingham Palace: FULL TEXT OF THE SPEECH Since last Sunday's dreadful news we have seen, throughout Britain and around the world, an overwhelming expression of sadness at Diana's death. We have all been trying in our different ways to cope.
OPINION
September 7, 1997 | Neal Gabler, Neal Gabler is author of "An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood." His newest book is "Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Cult of Celebrity."
In this age of celebrity, it may be said of certain people, however horrifying the thought, that death becomes them, and that is certainly true of Diana, princess of Wales, as it was of Elvis Presley and Marilyn Monroe. Had she lived, she could have doddered off into senility, tottering from one sordid affair to another, from one escapade to another, a better, more elegant version of Elizabeth Taylor--a celebrity for the ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
There's something inspiring for old-fashioned book lovers out there about an early scene in Deborah Harkness' novel "A Discovery of Witches" (Viking: 579 pp., $28.95). Magical creatures suddenly gather as a woman opens a legendary lost book. Never mind that most of these creatures ? vampires, daemons, witches ? are all plotting to get the book out of the hands of Diana, an American professor on a research trip in England. Menace aside, the scene is almost an hommage to the printed word: There's far more magic in an old book than in an iPad no matter how good the latter's backlighting is. "My fingers trembled when I loosened the small brass clasps?
TRAVEL
September 18, 2005 | Cara Greenberg, Special to The Times
THERE'S nothing like a red double-decker bus zipping down the wrong side of the street to let you know you're in London. I've always loved London's cheery behemoths but only as a symbol. When it came to getting places, I used to be strictly an Underground gal.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | MARILYN ZEITLIN, Zeitlin is a Malibu free-lance writer.
David Moller lays cradled in his 6-year-old sister Diana's arms sucking vigorously at the formula-filled bottle. David might appear a bit smaller than most other 5-month-old infants, but that's because David is a "preemie" and his delivery was not routine. The baby now sucking, burping and occasionally smiling up at Diana had made recent medical history.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
An American intelligence officer, carrying vital knowledge about the Allies' planned invasion of Normandy, is captured and tortured by the Nazis. He wakes up in an American military hospital in Germany and learns the war has been over for two years. Or has it? Tonight's TNT cable movie "Breaking Point," at 5 p.m. and again at 7, 9 and 11 p.m., is an abundantly stylish remake of "36 Hours," the 1964 film with James Garner, Eva Marie Saint and Rod Taylor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
The actress who portrayed housekeeper Aunt Bee on "The Andy Griffith Show" lived her last years in seclusion in a dark, dingy house and kept a 1966 green Studebaker with four flat tires in the garage. The home of Frances Bavier reflects little of the coziness of the fictional house that Aunt Bee managed for Mayberry's sheriff and his young son on the popular television series of the 1960s. The 86-year-old Miss Bavier died Dec.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
The husband of a DuPont family heiress was sentenced Thursday to more than 16 years in prison for his role in the contract killing of a former prostitute who became a family nemesis. "To this day, I don't know why I did what I did," Christopher Moseley told U.S. District Judge Justin Quackenbush. "But I do know Patricia Margello is dead, and I'm responsible for that." Moseley and three others were charged in the Aug. 2, 1998 death of Margello in a seedy motel near the Las Vegas Strip.
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