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Diane Venable

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991
Something is really wrong with a system that allows the Las Virgenes school district to give its teachers a 6% raise at a time when it is so desperate for money that it is increasing class sizes, cutting student programs and considering a parcel tax to help ease its deficit. The school board already gave the go-ahead to spend $50,000 on a consultant to try to win property owners' approval of the tax. You would think that the district could find less costly means to find out if the already overburdened property owners would be willing to pay for the 6% raise the teachers just got. There are many excellent teachers in this district.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991
There are many voters opposed to Las Virgenes Unified School District's parcel tax (Proposition K), but they will not be public about it. They feel a real threat to themselves or their children from school tax proponents--the Committee for "YES" on Quality Education, which includes most of the teachers, administrators, and parents working closely with the schools. Whether the tax passes or fails, parents who go public with their opposition, whether through letters to the editor or asking questions at the proponents' meetings, will be remembered as "against quality education" for a long time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991
As a former elementary school librarian of the Las Virgenes Unified School District, I take issue with Diane Venable's letter decrying the salary increase in that district. Teachers deserve every cent of that raise. Las Virgenes has a well-deserved reputation for excellence. The district has several schools recognized by the Department of Education as outstanding. Families move to the area specifically for the quality education the schools offer. Unfortunately, this excellence is achieved by hiring superior people, both teaching and support, and then overburdening them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1991
The Las Virgenes Unified School District is proposing a parcel tax for the November ballot in response to their recent budget cuts. They say the tax will enable the district to reverse all of its cuts, plus they promise to lower class sizes. (We've heard this before). They say the tax money won't be used for teachers' salaries (they just received a 6% raise and generous medical benefits) but in order to lower class sizes, more teachers will need to be hired, therefore, some of that money will go to salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991
There are many voters opposed to Las Virgenes Unified School District's parcel tax (Proposition K), but they will not be public about it. They feel a real threat to themselves or their children from school tax proponents--the Committee for "YES" on Quality Education, which includes most of the teachers, administrators, and parents working closely with the schools. Whether the tax passes or fails, parents who go public with their opposition, whether through letters to the editor or asking questions at the proponents' meetings, will be remembered as "against quality education" for a long time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1987
Recently my Sumac fifth-grader was asked to fill out a form indicating her preference for one elective out of three offered at A. E. Wright Middle School for new sixth-graders this fall. Being naturally curious, we picked up the sixth-grade elective form at Lindero Canyon Middle School for comparison. Guess what? There is no comparison. First, Lindero Canyon offers two electives to any sixth-grader who selects zero period P.E. A.E. Wright canceled its zero period and offers only one elective per student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1987
I am happy to hear that our Education Superintendent, Bill Honig, is studying our middle schools and recommending some changes. However, the recent unanimous decision by our Las Virgenes School Board to combine Indian Hills Continuation High School, A.E. Wright Middle School and the new district offices all on the same campus is not the kind of change that Mr. Honig had in mind. Our school board stated, matter of factly, that the athletic fields will be shared. It only follows that the gymnasium and showers will also be shared as well as the library and the lunch facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1990
Two key questions arise out of the recent wheelings and dealings by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy and Bob Hope over an access road to his property. Why is all this going on when the Draft EIRs for Hope's project and for the Liberty Canyon project (both with Potomac Investment Associates as developers) are not yet ready for public review? Could it be that the projects are so harsh on all aspects of the environment that the developers know they could never even attempt to mitigate them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1991
The Las Virgenes Unified School District is proposing a parcel tax for the November ballot in response to their recent budget cuts. They say the tax will enable the district to reverse all of its cuts, plus they promise to lower class sizes. (We've heard this before). They say the tax money won't be used for teachers' salaries (they just received a 6% raise and generous medical benefits) but in order to lower class sizes, more teachers will need to be hired, therefore, some of that money will go to salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1986
After almost two months of diligent research, the Agoura Hills Parents for Neighborhood Schools have determined that the watchwords for the Las Virgenes School District for the next ten years are restricting, portables, year - round education and overcrowded classrooms. We are still adamant about the school board's arbitrary decision to divide our community by using Kanan Road as "a natural boundary" as stated by one board member. The Las Virgenes School District has quite a history of redistricting to temporarily alleviate overcrowding at various schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991
As a former elementary school librarian of the Las Virgenes Unified School District, I take issue with Diane Venable's letter decrying the salary increase in that district. Teachers deserve every cent of that raise. Las Virgenes has a well-deserved reputation for excellence. The district has several schools recognized by the Department of Education as outstanding. Families move to the area specifically for the quality education the schools offer. Unfortunately, this excellence is achieved by hiring superior people, both teaching and support, and then overburdening them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991
Something is really wrong with a system that allows the Las Virgenes school district to give its teachers a 6% raise at a time when it is so desperate for money that it is increasing class sizes, cutting student programs and considering a parcel tax to help ease its deficit. The school board already gave the go-ahead to spend $50,000 on a consultant to try to win property owners' approval of the tax. You would think that the district could find less costly means to find out if the already overburdened property owners would be willing to pay for the 6% raise the teachers just got. There are many excellent teachers in this district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1990
Two key questions arise out of the recent wheelings and dealings by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy and Bob Hope over an access road to his property. Why is all this going on when the Draft EIRs for Hope's project and for the Liberty Canyon project (both with Potomac Investment Associates as developers) are not yet ready for public review? Could it be that the projects are so harsh on all aspects of the environment that the developers know they could never even attempt to mitigate them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1987
Recently my Sumac fifth-grader was asked to fill out a form indicating her preference for one elective out of three offered at A. E. Wright Middle School for new sixth-graders this fall. Being naturally curious, we picked up the sixth-grade elective form at Lindero Canyon Middle School for comparison. Guess what? There is no comparison. First, Lindero Canyon offers two electives to any sixth-grader who selects zero period P.E. A.E. Wright canceled its zero period and offers only one elective per student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1987
I am happy to hear that our Education Superintendent, Bill Honig, is studying our middle schools and recommending some changes. However, the recent unanimous decision by our Las Virgenes School Board to combine Indian Hills Continuation High School, A.E. Wright Middle School and the new district offices all on the same campus is not the kind of change that Mr. Honig had in mind. Our school board stated, matter of factly, that the athletic fields will be shared. It only follows that the gymnasium and showers will also be shared as well as the library and the lunch facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1986
After almost two months of diligent research, the Agoura Hills Parents for Neighborhood Schools have determined that the watchwords for the Las Virgenes School District for the next ten years are restricting, portables, year - round education and overcrowded classrooms. We are still adamant about the school board's arbitrary decision to divide our community by using Kanan Road as "a natural boundary" as stated by one board member. The Las Virgenes School District has quite a history of redistricting to temporarily alleviate overcrowding at various schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994
Let me congratulate the Conejo Valley Unified School District on its recognition that we need to teach kids how to resolve their differences other than by violence. It's time to stop just doing what comes naturally. Violence comes naturally. We need to go beyond what's easy and teach non-violent conflict resolution, including mediation. One text I recommend for use with teens and adults is former President Jimmy Carter's "Talking Peace," which deals with nonviolent conflict resolution techniques between individuals and nations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994
Let me congratulate the Conejo Valley Unified School District on its recognition that we need to teach kids how to resolve their differences other than by violence. It's time to stop just doing what comes naturally. Violence comes naturally. We need to go beyond what's easy and teach nonviolent conflict resolution, including mediation. One text I recommend for use with teen-agers and adults is former President Jimmy Carter's "Talking Peace," which deals with nonviolent conflict resolution techniques between individuals and nations.
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