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Diane Watson

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OPINION
March 23, 1997
Re "With No Apologies, Watson Fights On," March 16: As a college student government leader, I have searched for women in politics to whose roles I may aspire--women who speak the truth, stand on the front lines firm in their beliefs and know firsthand the plight of our citizens. State Sen. Diane Watson (D-Los Angeles) embodies conviction. Her work for women, children and families is crucial, dispelling the deadly myths about those receiving public assistance. She sees the lack of opportunities, training and child care.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2011 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
It was just 6 a.m. on most mornings when the teenager would board a city bus and startle sleepy passengers by loudly announcing that his cousin, Diane Watson, was getting on. Then the teacher and school psychologist, an imposing African American woman standing 6 feet tall in heels, would sweep down the aisle, repeating her name three times and telling anyone half-listening that she was running for the Los Angeles school board and was "out to meet...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001
The voters of the 32nd Congressional District face a difficult choice in the April 10 special election. None of the candidates on the ballot measure up to Rep. Julian Dixon, who died in office in December after more than 20 years of masterfully representing a hugely diverse area that includes the Crenshaw district, Koreatown, the neighborhoods around USC, Culver City, Baldwin Hills, Mar Vista, Ladera Heights, Leimert Park and Cheviot Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
The contest to succeed Congresswoman Diane Watson seemed all but settled even before it officially began. In February, when Watson, 76, a Los Angeles Democrat, announced her retirement plans and endorsed then-Assembly Speaker Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles) a few days later, the congresswoman in effect cleared the field of strong competitors. She helped avert the type of bruising battle that marked her first campaign for the House seat nearly 10 years ago. At that time, the unexpected death of Democratic Rep. Julian Dixon touched off a contentious succession scramble that featured some of Los Angeles' best known African American politicians.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former state Sen. Diane Watson, benefiting from a heavy Democratic registration edge, sailed to victory Tuesday night for the congressional seat left vacant by the death of Rep. Julian Dixon. Watson, 67, will become the oldest freshman member in the current House of Representatives when she is sworn in as the 32nd District's congresswoman Thursday. Watson was virtually assured of victory in April when she won a hotly contested Democratic primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2011 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
It was just 6 a.m. on most mornings when the teenager would board a city bus and startle sleepy passengers by loudly announcing that his cousin, Diane Watson, was getting on. Then the teacher and school psychologist, an imposing African American woman standing 6 feet tall in heels, would sweep down the aisle, repeating her name three times and telling anyone half-listening that she was running for the Los Angeles school board and was "out to meet...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With more than 100,000 absentee ballots still to be counted and Yvonne Brathwaite Burke leading Diane Watson by 775 votes, the historic race to elect a black to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors remained too close to call Wednesday. Updated results from the hard-fought campaign will not be available until Monday at the earliest, officials said. But election workers on Wednesday began the laborious process of verifying signatures on the absentee ballots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2010 | Cathleen Decker
In Los Angeles, history often seems to careen on with hardly a backward glance. Last week, as Diane Watson announced that she would retire this year from Congress, history suffused the room and there were backward glances aplenty. In the conference room off Wilshire Boulevard stood many of the city's African American political lions, the men and women who helped in 1973 to make Tom Bradley the city's first -- and so far, only -- African American mayor. Bradley's name came up early on, as Watson joked to the Rev. Cecil Murray, the former head of First AME Church, about his ability to summon the mayor at all hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1996 | JEAN MERL and ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In one of the most public and dramatic airings of the long-festering tensions between Mayor Richard Riordan and many African American political leaders, state Sen. Diane Watson on Friday lit into Los Angeles' white Republican mayor, castigating him in a wide range of complaints. "This is not a feel-good session, this is a day for challenges," Watson (D-Los Angeles) said at what had begun as a celebratory community event honoring civil rights champion Martin Luther King Jr.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state Department of Corporations approved an HMO license for a Long Beach-based chain of clinics last spring without enforcing a requirement that the company submit signed disclosure statements from all its board members, officials disclosed Tuesday. Missing from Molina Medical Centers' application, said Commissioner Gary Mendoza, was a sworn statement from a key board member, state Sen. Diane Watson (D-Los Angeles), which the company had promised to file but never did.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2010 | By Jean Merl
Confirming speculation about her political plans, state Assembly Speaker Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles) said she would seek the seat of retiring Democratic Rep. Diane Watson, who appeared with Bass at a Los Angeles news conference Wednesday to give the speaker her endorsement. "This is a very, very humbling moment," Bass told community leaders and supporters who joined her outside her Mid-Wilshire-area office. "I am so proud to announce I'm going to throw my hat into the ring." If elected, Bass said, she'll have "very big shoes to fill."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2010 | Cathleen Decker
In Los Angeles, history often seems to careen on with hardly a backward glance. Last week, as Diane Watson announced that she would retire this year from Congress, history suffused the room and there were backward glances aplenty. In the conference room off Wilshire Boulevard stood many of the city's African American political lions, the men and women who helped in 1973 to make Tom Bradley the city's first -- and so far, only -- African American mayor. Bradley's name came up early on, as Watson joked to the Rev. Cecil Murray, the former head of First AME Church, about his ability to summon the mayor at all hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2010 | Jean Merl
By the time Democratic Rep. Diane Watson announced Thursday that she would end her political career after more than three decades, word of her impending retirement had spread so widely that she joked about the anticlimactic nature of the news conference she held in her Wilshire Boulevard office. But Watson had at least one surprise up her sleeve -- she declined to endorse a candidate to succeed her, raising eyebrows among the many political observers who expected her to back state Assembly Speaker Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles)
BUSINESS
June 2, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Can Lassie, Judy Garland and a young Elizabeth Taylor rescue America's image abroad? Rep. Diane Watson (D-Los Angeles) thinks so. She wants to ship DVDs of classic Hollywood movies overseas, hoping they will reshape an image she believes has been tarnished by the Iraq war. Her plan: Stock libraries of U.S. embassies and consulates with the films, then loosen restrictions so the public in each nation has access to them. Not just any movies, but wholesome ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Diane Watson (D-Culver City) was sworn into the House of Representatives on Thursday and vowed to follow in the footsteps of the late Rep. Julian Dixon, her onetime ally and the man she was elected to replace. With more than 100 supporters and her 91-year-old mother, Dorothy Watson, watching from the House gallery, Watson took the oath from Speaker Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) and then paid tribute to Dixon, a classmate at Dorsey High School and political ally.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former state Sen. Diane Watson, benefiting from a heavy Democratic registration edge, sailed to victory Tuesday night for the congressional seat left vacant by the death of Rep. Julian Dixon. Watson, 67, will become the oldest freshman member in the current House of Representatives when she is sworn in as the 32nd District's congresswoman Thursday. Watson was virtually assured of victory in April when she won a hotly contested Democratic primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1993 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Compton Mayor Walter R. Tucker III was elected to Congress last year, his colleagues on the City Council declined to put out the welcome mat for him, literally. Tucker sought to rent space for his congressional office in the city of Compton's new Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Transit Center, but the council majority slammed the door in his face and hung up a "No Vacancy" sign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The congressional race between former state Sen. Diane Watson, businesswoman Noel Irwin Hentschel and two minor-party candidates has boiled down to a debate over debates, as three contenders chomp for the chance to take on Watson, but Watson continues to decline. Wednesday night, the candidates met to compare views at an event in the Crenshaw district sponsored by the Los Angeles Press Club and the Black Chamber of Commerce of L.A. County. They found Watson's chair empty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wrapping up a special election to fill the seat vacated when U.S. Rep. Julian Dixon died last year, four candidates vying for the chance to represent the 32nd Congressional District are making a last push today to turn out their supporters. Diane Watson--who served for 20 years in the state Senate and was the leading vote-getter in the April primary--is pitted against Republican Noel Irwin Hentschel, Green Party candidate Donna J. Warren and Reform Party candidate Ezola Foster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her first public forum since winning the April primary in the 32nd Congressional District race, former state Sen. Diane Watson denounced a recent campaign mailer by an opponent, which described her as someone who "wants to give free needles to heroin addicts" and showed a graphic photograph of an addict shooting up. "It was a very scurrilous attack piece," Watson said about the mailer sent by her Republican challenger, Noel Irwin Hentschel. "It came into people's homes. . . .
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