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Diane Whipple

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NEWS
February 2, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a small woman, but she was determined and fast and full of moxie. That was how more than 400 friends and family members remembered Diane Whipple, who died in a dog attack in San Francisco, during an emotion-filled memorial Thursday night in the chapel of St. Mary's College. Mourners tried to push thoughts of the brutality of her final moments to the back of their minds. They remembered the good things about a woman who this past year guided St.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could send a defendant in a grisly dog-mauling case back to prison, a state appellate panel Thursday ordered a judge to reconsider throwing out the jury's murder verdict. Three years ago, San Francisco Superior Court Judge James Warren outraged victim advocates and prosecutors when he vacated the second-degree murder conviction of Marjorie Knoller, who owned the two dogs that attacked and killed neighbor Diane Whipple on Jan. 26, 2001.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dog-mauling victim Diane Whipple was killed in the same way a lion pounces on its prey, suffering bruises and cuts everywhere except for the soles of her feet and the top of her head, a chief medical examiner testified Monday. The most severe wounds were to Whipple's neck, where her jugular vein was severed and her larynx was punctured, Dr. Boyd Stephens told jurors in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2004 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
Marjorie Knoller, convicted along with her husband of involuntary manslaughter in the dog-mauling death of a neighbor in San Francisco, will be paroled to a location in Southern California within a few days, officials said Wednesday. The community where she will serve her parole will not be identified without her permission, said Russ Heimerich, a spokesman for the Department of Corrections.
OPINION
March 20, 2002
Re "New Rep as Killer Drives Up Demand for Presa Canario," March 17: Your article noted that the Presa Canario dog breed (the dogs that killed Diane Whipple) and other breeds such as the Rottweilers and pit bulls are sadly becoming more popular as a result of the woman's death and subsequent trial. The city of Los Angeles uses animal licensing fees to control the spaying and neutering of dogs by charging nearly $200 for unspayed animals. I think the city should do the same and charge a higher license fee ($200 or more)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The man reviled in this city after blaming dog mauling victim Diane Whipple for her own death was expected to be released from prison soon after serving little more than half of his four-year sentence, but he won't be returning to San Francisco. Robert Noel, whose behavior was called "despicable" by the judge who sentenced him to prison, was eligible for release on Friday, but prison officials would not discuss his status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Defense lawyers tried to convince a judge Friday that Marjorie Knoller and Robert Noel, the lawyer couple accused in the dog-mauling death of Diane Whipple, deserve to have their bail reduced. Knoller faces a second-degree murder charge and Noel faces an involuntary manslaughter charge in Whipple's death Jan. 26. Both face charges of keeping a mischievous dog that killed a human being.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 2002 | STEVE BERRY
At 3 a.m. on Feb. 8, 2001, Marjorie Knoller and her husband, Robert Noel, got out of bed so they'd be on time for their scheduled appearance on "Good Morning America." They wanted to correct what they considered the "grotesque and negative" image they'd developed in the media since Jan. 26, when their large Presa Canario dogs, Bane and Hera, got away from Knoller in the hallway of their San Francisco apartment building and one of them mauled neighbor Diane Whipple to death.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The keepers of two dogs involved in the fatal mauling of a San Francisco woman conspired with prison inmates to breed dogs "trained to fight, attack or kill," prosecutors said Wednesday. Prosecutor James Hammer announced the allegations against Robert Noel and his wife, Marjorie Knoller, as he urged a judge not to throw out evidence that police had seized from the couple's apartment. The couple's two dogs attacked and killed 33-year-old Diane Whipple on Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Francisco trial judge ruled Friday that the lesbian partner of a woman mauled by dogs can take her wrongful-death lawsuit to trial even though the couple were not married. Superior Court Judge A. James Robertson II agreed with Sharon Smith's lawyer that California law has created an insurmountable barrier for her by not allowing same-sex couples to marry and, thus, precluding them from receiving benefits given to married couples.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The man reviled in this city after blaming dog mauling victim Diane Whipple for her own death was expected to be released from prison soon after serving little more than half of his four-year sentence, but he won't be returning to San Francisco. Robert Noel, whose behavior was called "despicable" by the judge who sentenced him to prison, was eligible for release on Friday, but prison officials would not discuss his status.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 2002 | STEVE BERRY
At 3 a.m. on Feb. 8, 2001, Marjorie Knoller and her husband, Robert Noel, got out of bed so they'd be on time for their scheduled appearance on "Good Morning America." They wanted to correct what they considered the "grotesque and negative" image they'd developed in the media since Jan. 26, when their large Presa Canario dogs, Bane and Hera, got away from Knoller in the hallway of their San Francisco apartment building and one of them mauled neighbor Diane Whipple to death.
OPINION
March 20, 2002
Re "New Rep as Killer Drives Up Demand for Presa Canario," March 17: Your article noted that the Presa Canario dog breed (the dogs that killed Diane Whipple) and other breeds such as the Rottweilers and pit bulls are sadly becoming more popular as a result of the woman's death and subsequent trial. The city of Los Angeles uses animal licensing fees to control the spaying and neutering of dogs by charging nearly $200 for unspayed animals. I think the city should do the same and charge a higher license fee ($200 or more)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Francisco attorney on trial for murder in the dog mauling of her neighbor denied Tuesday that her Presa Canario dogs were aggressive, despite earlier testimony by nearly 30 witnesses that the dogs had lunged at or charged others. Defendant Marjorie Knoller testified that she could not have known her dogs would do something so "disgusting and gruesome" as attack Diane Whipple. "How can you anticipate something like that?" she said. "It's a totally bizarre event."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dog-mauling victim Diane Whipple was killed in the same way a lion pounces on its prey, suffering bruises and cuts everywhere except for the soles of her feet and the top of her head, a chief medical examiner testified Monday. The most severe wounds were to Whipple's neck, where her jugular vein was severed and her larynx was punctured, Dr. Boyd Stephens told jurors in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Defense lawyers tried to convince a judge Friday that Marjorie Knoller and Robert Noel, the lawyer couple accused in the dog-mauling death of Diane Whipple, deserve to have their bail reduced. Knoller faces a second-degree murder charge and Noel faces an involuntary manslaughter charge in Whipple's death Jan. 26. Both face charges of keeping a mischievous dog that killed a human being.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could send a defendant in a grisly dog-mauling case back to prison, a state appellate panel Thursday ordered a judge to reconsider throwing out the jury's murder verdict. Three years ago, San Francisco Superior Court Judge James Warren outraged victim advocates and prosecutors when he vacated the second-degree murder conviction of Marjorie Knoller, who owned the two dogs that attacked and killed neighbor Diane Whipple on Jan. 26, 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2004 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
Marjorie Knoller, convicted along with her husband of involuntary manslaughter in the dog-mauling death of a neighbor in San Francisco, will be paroled to a location in Southern California within a few days, officials said Wednesday. The community where she will serve her parole will not be identified without her permission, said Russ Heimerich, a spokesman for the Department of Corrections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Francisco trial judge ruled Friday that the lesbian partner of a woman mauled by dogs can take her wrongful-death lawsuit to trial even though the couple were not married. Superior Court Judge A. James Robertson II agreed with Sharon Smith's lawyer that California law has created an insurmountable barrier for her by not allowing same-sex couples to marry and, thus, precluding them from receiving benefits given to married couples.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Two lawyers charged in the death of a neighbor who was mauled by their dogs had struggled in the past to control their large pets, according to investigation documents unsealed Thursday. Marjorie Knoller and Robert Noel have long said the dogs were gentle. But many of the newly released reports say the couple barely could control the two dogs named Bane and Hera. Previous incidents allegedly included two attacks on a blind woman and her guide dog. Another dog nearly died after being bitten.
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