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OPINION
August 3, 2013
Asubstantial number of poor mothers have difficulty affording disposable diapers for their babies, according to a study reported on Monday by The Times. The article spotlighted a disabled, out-of-work single mother who said buying diapers for her 11-month-old son was a financial hardship. The reaction from readers? Sympathy for low-income moms and their children? Hardly. Of the two-dozen letters responding to the article, all but two had stern words for the single mother and anyone else who uses disposable diapers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A fire at an adult diaper manufacturing and distributing plant in Boyle Heights on Wednesday caused an estimated $1.4 million in damage, authorities said. The fire was reported at 10:33 a.m. in an industrial area in the 1500 block of Mirasol Street, according to Brian Humphrey of the Los Angeles Fire Department. Smoke from the fire was spotted by firefighters in an engine, Humphrey added. It took more than 75 firefighters to quash the flames. The fire department said the business operating at the building is Ideal Brands, which manufactures and distributes personal hygiene and incontinence products.  Humphrey said the $1.4 million in damage included $750,000 to the structure and $650,000 to contents.  ALSO: Two found dead after fire in Whittier Body found inside car in Tujunga Wash Homicide suspected after woman's body found inside Wilmington motel Twitter: @aribloomekatz | Facebook ari.bloomekatz@latimes.com
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NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Disposable diapers are an actual need? Good thing no one ever told my mother. A study in the journal Pediatrics “discovers” an unmet health “need” among impoverished families: the disposable diapers they can't afford . The study is so focused on disposables and the $18-a-week cost that it doesn't even mention cloth. Some of the mothers, when they didn't have enough diapers, would put off changing their babies, increasing the risk of diaper rash and other infection.
OPINION
August 3, 2013
Asubstantial number of poor mothers have difficulty affording disposable diapers for their babies, according to a study reported on Monday by The Times. The article spotlighted a disabled, out-of-work single mother who said buying diapers for her 11-month-old son was a financial hardship. The reaction from readers? Sympathy for low-income moms and their children? Hardly. Of the two-dozen letters responding to the article, all but two had stern words for the single mother and anyone else who uses disposable diapers.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Jay-Z sees himself changing diapers in the very near future. GQ's man of the year says that he fully intends to be an active and involved father when wife Beyonce, due in February, gives birth to their first child. "Providing -- that's not love," he told the magazine . " Being there -- that's more important. " For many men, though, fatherhood may be synonymous with finances. According to health writer  Jeannine Stein , "a study published online in March in the Journal of Advanced Nursing found that among 66 couples, men were freaked out about family and pregnancy issues and generally felt overloaded.
SCIENCE
July 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
There have been days, since her son Ezekiel was born 11 months ago, that Los Angeles mom Beth Capper has gone without food to keep up her supply. One friend was arrested for stealing some. It's not drugs or alcohol or even baby formula that has put her in such a bind. It's diapers. "There's no way around buying them," said Capper, a 41-year-old single mother who doesn't work because of a disability. Across the country, mothers like Capper are facing the same predicament. According to a report published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, diaper need - the inability to afford to keep a child in clean diapers - affects a "substantial" number of low-income Americans, with nearly 30% of mothers questioned in New Haven, Conn., reporting that they did not have enough for their children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000
In "America Changes Diapers: From Cloth to Disposable" (March 6), you write that the average annual cost of disposables is $515, according to Procter & Gamble. Who are they kidding? That's about $9.90 a week. Any parent using disposables can tell you that that won't buy enough Pampers, a P&G product, for one week for one baby. DIANE YEE Huntington Beach
HOME & GARDEN
June 17, 2010 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
On a recent Friday night, a very pregnant Sheila Dos Santos and her husband were two-thirds of the way through an hour and a half cloth diapering workshop, trying to wrap their heads around the myriad diapering options available to the modern parent. Laid out on the large coffee table in front of them were dozens of types of diapers and covers and inserts, as well as a plastic baby doll to try them on. "I'm so overwhelmed," said Dos Santos, looking down at the 11-page booklet she held in her hands.
NEWS
April 15, 1990
Did it never occur to ecologically minded Lori Lerner Gray of Malibu to buy cotton diapers and wash them herself? When her tot is potty-trained, she could recycle those same diapers as rags, perhaps reducing her reliance on disposable paper towels. Instead she chose to bring one more polluting vehicle 50 miles to her home. Shame on her. CYNTHIA WURTZ Los Angeles
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | United Press International
Two suspicious looking packages that prompted the pilot of a Trans World Airlines plane carrying 43 passengers to make an emergency landing turned out to be bundles of diapers, police said.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Disposable diapers are an actual need? Good thing no one ever told my mother. A study in the journal Pediatrics “discovers” an unmet health “need” among impoverished families: the disposable diapers they can't afford . The study is so focused on disposables and the $18-a-week cost that it doesn't even mention cloth. Some of the mothers, when they didn't have enough diapers, would put off changing their babies, increasing the risk of diaper rash and other infection.
SCIENCE
July 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
There have been days, since her son Ezekiel was born 11 months ago, that Los Angeles mom Beth Capper has gone without food to keep up her supply. One friend was arrested for stealing some. It's not drugs or alcohol or even baby formula that has put her in such a bind. It's diapers. "There's no way around buying them," said Capper, a 41-year-old single mother who doesn't work because of a disability. Across the country, mothers like Capper are facing the same predicament. According to a report published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, diaper need - the inability to afford to keep a child in clean diapers - affects a "substantial" number of low-income Americans, with nearly 30% of mothers questioned in New Haven, Conn., reporting that they did not have enough for their children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A Long Beach woman was shot and killed Thursday morning after she left a relative's apartment to grab her toddler's diaper bag, police said. Jazzmine Wash, 23, dropped off her 3-year-old at the home in the 500 block of Walnut Avenue and walked out to get the bag when gunfire broke out about 6:20 a.m., Long Beach police said. Responding officers and paramedics found Wash in the apartment's courtyard with multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body. She was pronounced dead at the scene, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Veronica Rocha
A 31-year-old man who police say was keeping beer in a diaper bag in his car while allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol, with his two young daughters unrestrained in car seats, has pleaded not guilty. The man, Juan Peralta, was stopped by Glendale police Friday when he allegedly failed to pull over after hitting a Volkswagen on Brand Boulevard near California Avenue. He initially told police he was trying to rush his children to the hospital. But officers smelled alcohol on his breath and found six cans of Budweiser inside the younger daughter's diaper bag, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Veronica Rocha
A 31-year-old man remained in Glendale police custody on Tuesday after allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol with his two young daughters aboard -- and not in car seats. The man, Juan Peralta, initially told officers he was trying to rush his children to the hospital. But in addition to the smell of alcohol on his breath, police reported finding six Budweiser beer cans inside his youngest daughter's diaper bag. Peralta was stopped by police Friday when he allegedly failed to pull over after hitting a Volkswagen at about 1:07 p.m. on Brand Boulevard near California Avenue.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
In Chicago, certain names have become synonymous with a specific type of tragedy for girls, which can be recalled with bleak and brief synopsis: Hadiya Pendleton, a 15-year-old majorette, shot in the back after coming home from President Obama's inauguration; Janay McFarlane, 18, gunned down in North Chicago while walking with friends -- her 14-year-old sister had just heard the president give a speech about gun violence. Now there is another name to add. Six-month-old Jonylah Watkins died at a hospital Tuesday morning after being shot while getting her diaper changed by her father, who was shot too. She is survived by her 20-year old mother -- who had once been shot in the leg while eight months' pregnant -- and her father, Jonathan Watkins, 29, who remained in the hospital in serious condition, officials said.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1992 | Reuters
The Washington state attorney general's office has filed suit against a Seattle diaper company, claiming that it falsely advertised that it recycles disposable diapers. In the civil suit filed in King County Superior Court, the attorney general charges that Anderson Diaper Co. violated the state's consumer protection act by misrepresenting its service, for which it charges $20 a month. The suit argues that the majority of the diapers were being sent to a solid-waste dump.
NEWS
September 15, 1988
I read your article "Diaper Wars" (by Lynn Simross, Sept. 7) with great interest, but was concerned to see that one of the most controversial issues in the use of most ultra-dry disposable diapers wasn't even alluded to. As a parent, I am concerned about exposing my children to unnecessary chemicals of any kind. Since I learned that most new diapers contain chemicals that turn moisture into an acid gel, I found a chemical-free diaper called TenderCare. I saw no mention of that or any other alternative diapers in your article.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A Chicago man and his baby daughter were shot while he changed her diaper in a van on the street, police said Monday. Jonathan Watkins, 29, was shot in the left side, cheek and right buttock, police said. His daughter, identified by family members as Jonylah Watkins, was wounded by a bullet that passed through her right shoulder and landed in her thigh, police said. The baby was in critical condition after surgery at Comer Children's Hospital, the Chicago Tribune reported. Jonathan Watkins went to Northwestern Memorial Hospital in serious to critical condition, the Tribune said.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2013 | By Tina Susman
A young mother carried her baby, along with a loaded gun in a diaper bag, into a Philadelphia school where she had gone to sign up for classes, police said, one of two gun-in-school incidents reported in the city as the national debate on gun control raged in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., massacre. In the second incident Thursday, a high school student hid a gun in his shoe, but it was found when he walked through a metal detector. His gun was not loaded. But the weapon carried by 21-year-old Kelly Jones in the bottom of her pink-and-white diaper bag was fully loaded, police say, and Jones -- who was accompanied by her aunt and her baby when she was caught with it -- now faces criminal charges.
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