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Dick Armey

NEWS
December 11, 2001 | Associated Press
House Majority Leader Dick Armey, second-ranking leader among Republicans and an advocate for tax cuts and smaller government, has told associates he may retire at the end of his term, a source close to the Texas lawmaker said Monday. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Armey had notified House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert and other Republicans that he may not seek reelection to a 10th term in 2002.
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NEWS
April 19, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas) on Thursday defended the Whitewater hearings as a justified response to a "very mean" Democratic Party led by a president who practices politics as a "blood sport." In perhaps the most open official acknowledgment yet of the GOP's political interests in the hearings, Armey said in a C-SPAN cable network interview that "politics is a mean business, and the Democratic Party is a very mean party. And our guys have to respond."
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--"Wow!" It was a shock, really," Douglas Ebding said, adding that he was present during the births of the triplets--all girls. "It was neat." "Oh, it really hasn't hit me yet," Susan Ebding, 19, said, and no fertility drugs were used. She gave birth to twins in March and now, triplets. She recalled how once she and her husband, 20, were so concerned that they might not be able to have children. "We thought we wouldn't have any, and then, all of a sudden, two, then three," she said.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.), announced tearfully Monday that he will retire after nearly four decades in Congress, touching off what is certain to be a fierce struggle for GOP leadership in the House. Michel's decision, announced at a press conference in Peoria, appeared to be driven in part by frustration over his party's loss of the White House and over the confrontational style of his more conservative GOP rivals.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas) suggested Tuesday that President Clinton should resign, while a friend of Kathleen E. Willey, who has accused Clinton of groping her, and a White House archivist were questioned before a federal grand jury here. Army's implicit call for Clinton's resignation ranks as the most severe criticism leveled by a Republican leader since the controversy surrounding the president's relationship with former White House intern Monica S.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Tex.) said Sunday that $40 billion a year in federal spending cuts would be required to offset the loss of revenue from a "flat tax" proposal he plans to introduce. But Armey said his approach to overhauling the federal income tax--imposing a 17% rate for everyone--would be more fair and less burdensome to taxpayers who are upset with the complexity of the current system.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), once a political colossus who commanded the loyalty of his party, has escaped a new, more serious effort to oust him from his leadership post, Republican lawmakers and aides say. The abortive plot, hatched in secret meetings of Gingrich's critics last week, involved a broader range of Republican members than the small but vocal faction that for months has complained about Gingrich's trouble-plagued reign as speaker, GOP leadership aides said.
NEWS
January 22, 1996 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas) warned Sunday that the House will not raise the federal debt limit that allows the U.S. government to pay its bills unless President Clinton accepts a "substantial" share of the conservative GOP agenda. "I don't think it would pass" unless it contains GOP measures "decreasing the size and intrusiveness of government," Armey said.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART and JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Republicans today will decide a hard-fought leadership race that poses a particularly difficult problem for Orange County's six conservative representatives. The contest for the third-ranking GOP leadership post, which pits moderate California Rep. Jerry Lewis of Redlands against conservative Texan Dick Armey, is of special importance. Its outcome, members agree, will largely shape the minority party's dealings with Democrats--and President-elect Bill Clinton--during the next two years.
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