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Dick Asher

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1989
William Pfaff's commentary, "U.S. Talk, Fear, Bluster Won't Cut It" (Op-Ed Page, Nov. 13), doesn't cut it. I was amazed to see that Pfaff took seriously a piece of Japanese literature, "A Japan That Can Say No," that is overtly chauvinistic and biased. To call the United States racist because it dropped the atomic bomb on Japan rather than Nazi Germany skirts the facts. The bomb wasn't even tested until after Germany surrendered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1989
William Pfaff's commentary, "U.S. Talk, Fear, Bluster Won't Cut It" (Op-Ed Page, Nov. 13), doesn't cut it. I was amazed to see that Pfaff took seriously a piece of Japanese literature, "A Japan That Can Say No," that is overtly chauvinistic and biased. To call the United States racist because it dropped the atomic bomb on Japan rather than Nazi Germany skirts the facts. The bomb wasn't even tested until after Germany surrendered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Every man has his price. What's yours? --Jimmy Hoffa If Danny DeVito were a rubber band, he'd be ready to snap. For two days, the director has been trying to shoot a complicated sequence in "Hoffa," which stars Jack Nicholson as Jimmy Hoffa, dark prince of the American labor movement. Nothing is going right. The sound is garbled. Extras knock over chairs. A flock of pigeons flies across the sound stage's cavernous rafters, making a racket.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent announcement that Alain Levy will become president and chief executive of Polygram N.V. has sparked speculation that the company might make music industry history by naming a black executive to head its U.S. operations. A Polygram official said privately that when Levy moves to Europe and assumes his new duties Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air," Hunter said this week from a tour stop in Dallas. He and guitarist Mick Ronson bring their band to the Southland for a series of dates starting tonight at the Bacchanal in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air," Hunter said this week from a tour stop in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1988 | PAUL GREIN
Testimonial fund-raisers are often tedious, hollow exercises, but Thursday night's salute to music-industry veteran Joe Smith--which raised $1 million for the City of Hope--was an exception. Smith, president of Capitol Industries-EMI, has emceed about 40 testimonial dinners in the last 20 years, but the gala at the Century Plaza Hotel was the first time he has consented to be the honoree. Finally, the industry's toastmaster was being toasted.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In rock 'n' roll, the most colorful shouting matches are between managers and record company execs. They're natural adversaries, with managers fighting, often quite ferociously, for as much record-label support as possible for each of their acts. So why are so many formidable managers so happy with MCA Records these days? Easy--they all have new custom-label deals there.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1988 | PAUL GREIN
It costs close to $500,000 to record and market an album by a new artist these days, so the last thing an executive wants to hear when he tells friends about a new signing is a wisecrack. But that's exactly what Ed Eckstine, general manager of Wing Records, has heard since he announced the signing of Vanessa Williams--who was forced to give up her Miss America crown four years ago when nude photos of her appeared in Penthouse magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Truth is stranger than fiction, but as country singer turned novelist Kinky Friedman put it the other day, "When you write fiction, you can tell the truth." Maybe that's why two longtime music industry figures--Friedman and heavyweight rock lawyer Freddie Gershon--have new novels out this month.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1987 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
It took eight years, but it appears that the U.S. recording industry is finally back on its feet. For now, at least. According to figures released last month by the Recording Industry Assn. of America, the retail value of shipments of records and tapes reached $4.65 billion in 1986, topping the industry's previous best performance of $4.1 billion in 1978.
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