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Dick Francis

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Bestselling mystery author Dick Francis is ending a six-year hiatus and publishing his first book since the death of his wife and collaborator, Mary Francis. This fall, G.P. Putnam's Sons will release "Under Orders," his 39th novel. "I am delighted that ... my family has talked me back into the literary saddle," the British author, 85, said Tuesday in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Dick Francis, a champion steeplechase jockey in Britain who became a bestselling mystery writer, died Sunday at his home in the Cayman Islands. He was 89. Ruth Cairns, a spokeswoman for Francis, told the Associated Press that the author died of natural causes. He wrote more than 40 novels, many featuring racing as a theme, after retiring from racing in 1957. "I haven't suffered the same injuries as my characters, but I have suffered pain and I know it," he told The Times during a visit to Southern California in 1981.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Dick Francis, a champion steeplechase jockey in Britain who became a bestselling mystery writer, died Sunday at his home in the Cayman Islands. He was 89. Ruth Cairns, a spokeswoman for Francis, told the Associated Press that the author died of natural causes. He wrote more than 40 novels, many featuring racing as a theme, after retiring from racing in 1957. "I haven't suffered the same injuries as my characters, but I have suffered pain and I know it," he told The Times during a visit to Southern California in 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2009
Fiction weeks on list 1. Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon (Penguin Press: $27.95) Noir meets '60s Southern California groovy in a private eye's psychedelic quest. 5 2. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined while changing a Mississippi town. 14 3. South of Broad by Pat Conroy (Nan A. Talese: $29.95) A gossip columnist's homage to a close-knit group of friends from Charleston.
BOOKS
June 7, 1987 | Dick Lochte, Lochte's mystery novel, "Laughing Dog," will be published next year by Arbor House; his "Sleeping Dog" has just been reprinted in paperback by Warner
Steeplechase jockey-turned-author Dick Francis' last racing tale, "Break In," introduced us to a self-reliant rider named Kit Fielding who had to deal with a violent family feud that threatened him and his twin sister, a budding romance with a headstrong young woman and the navigation of several rather difficult races. The first of many surprises greeting us in Francis' new tale is the discovery that there is an Act Two to Kit's life.
BOOKS
September 7, 1986 | William Murray, Murray is the author of "Tip on a Dead Crab" and "The Hard Knocker's Luck." He is a staff writer for The New Yorker. and
Dick Francis' amiable, good-humored autobiography was first published in Great Britain in 1957 and now makes its belated appearance here, with an additional chapter bringing us up to date on the author's life through 1981.
BOOKS
February 28, 1988 | Tom Nolan, Nolan writes the Mr. Los Angeles column for Los Angeles Magazine
A father and son who have not spoken to one another for three years are the initially unlikely allies and co-principals of "Hot Money," the latest well made and highly entertaining novel from British mystery writer Dick Francis. Malcolm Pembroke is the father, a bluff but magnetic 68-year-old who's acquired considerable wealth as an arbitrageur ("A guy who makes money buying low and selling high," his son explains).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2007 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
When Dick Francis emerged from self-imposed retirement last year with "Under Orders," one of his better novels, he acknowledged the assistance of his son, Felix. Too bad he waited to make that collaboration official. Instead, father and son share their first byline on "Dead Heat," a swiftly paced but considerably less satisfying tale that, surprisingly, has more to do with catering than cantering.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Ian McShane, who this last TV season turned the head of Sue Ellen Ewing in his role of director Don Lockwood on "Dallas," will be back on the tube this coming year as the star of three two-hour movies based on Dick Francis mystery novels. He will play investigator Dick Cleveland in "The Dick Francis Mysteries," which will air as part of a syndicated "The Mystery Wheel of Adventure" from DLT Entertainment Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Francis, whose role in the writing of husband Dick Francis' best-selling mystery novels fueled a real-life whodunit last year, died of a heart attack Sept. 30 at her home in the Cayman Islands. She was 76. Dick Francis, author of 41 thrillers set in the British horse racing world that have sold 60 million copies worldwide, had often praised the contributions of his wife as his editor and research partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2007 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
When Dick Francis emerged from self-imposed retirement last year with "Under Orders," one of his better novels, he acknowledged the assistance of his son, Felix. Too bad he waited to make that collaboration official. Instead, father and son share their first byline on "Dead Heat," a swiftly paced but considerably less satisfying tale that, surprisingly, has more to do with catering than cantering.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2006 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
IN addition to the sinister-smart whodunit at the heart of Dick Francis' new novel, "Under Orders," there is another mystery worth perusing. Six years ago, after the author's wife and acknowledged collaborator, Mary, passed away, he stated that "Shattered," his 38th thriller in that many years, would be his last. He explained his change of mind in a recent interview in USA Today: "[M]y family has talked me back into the literary saddle."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Bestselling mystery author Dick Francis is ending a six-year hiatus and publishing his first book since the death of his wife and collaborator, Mary Francis. This fall, G.P. Putnam's Sons will release "Under Orders," his 39th novel. "I am delighted that ... my family has talked me back into the literary saddle," the British author, 85, said Tuesday in a statement.
BOOKS
October 22, 2000 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses."
I've read almost a dozen of Patricia Cornwell's books, most of them masterful. "The Last Precinct" is the best of the lot. It is about deception, double-dealing, suspicion, grief, guilt, duty, friendship, sadism and the rule of law. Familiar Cornwell-land, Richmond, Virg., is as crime-prone as ever. Foul play flourishes there, malignancy thrives and murder prospers. It is Christmas, an uneasy season, and Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Francis, whose role in the writing of husband Dick Francis' best-selling mystery novels fueled a real-life whodunit last year, died of a heart attack Sept. 30 at her home in the Cayman Islands. She was 76. Dick Francis, author of 41 thrillers set in the British horse racing world that have sold 60 million copies worldwide, had often praised the contributions of his wife as his editor and research partner.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | MARGO KAUFMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I've got to admit it. Dick Francis is a genius. I can find no other explanation for why, given the preposterous elements of "Second Wind" (Putnam, $24.95, 293 pages), his 40th novel, I woke up in the middle of the night worried about the protagonist, Perry Stuart. It would be difficult to come up with a less compelling profession for a sleuth: Stuart is a physicist turned meteorologist for the BBC.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
*** "Bolt" By Dick Francis. Read by Nigel Havers. Listen for Pleasure (two cassettes). Mysteries are particularly hard to slim down for audio because their plots tend to be so heavily encrusted with incident and detail. Even in this expert pruning of ex-jockey Dick Francis' thriller about a race course family feud, there are moments of unintentional bafflement ("Where did that come from?").
SPORTS
March 11, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gary Stevens has ridden Urgent Request once before--they finished fifth last year in the Rothmans International at Woodbine near Toronto--but because today's million-dollar Santa Anita Handicap will be the first race on dirt for the 5-year-old Irish-bred, the veteran jockey is in the dark. "It's a mystery to me how he'll run on dirt," said Stevens, back temporarily from Hong Kong, where he is under contract to ride until June.
BOOKS
August 21, 1994 | E.W. Alexander
New this week: WILD HORSES by Dick Francis (G.P. Putnam's Sons: $22.95). Thomas Lyon opts for filmmaking instead of the horse-racing trade of his ancestors. In true Francis style, though, he doesn't veer far from the track; his latest movie revives a 25-year-old mystery surrounding the death of a trainer's wife. PRETTY BOY FLOYD by Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana (Simon & Schuster: $24).
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