Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDictatorships
IN THE NEWS

Dictatorships

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, who resigned his job as Soviet foreign minister last year with a warning that Moscow was headed for dictatorship, said Monday that democratic forces now appear to have overcome that threat. "I think that in the autumn and winter there was a very severe danger of dictatorship," Shevardnadze said shortly before a White House meeting with President Bush. "(But) with every day we live, the threat of such a development becomes less and less."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Chris Kraul and Andres D'Alessandro
Argentine poet Juan Gelman, an exile whose writings were colored by personal tragedy he suffered at the hands of his country's brutal military dictatorship, died in Mexico City on Tuesday. He was 83 and had been battling leukemia. Gelman, a leftist with working-class origins, won the Cervantes Prize, perhaps the most prestigious Spanish language literary honor, in 2007 for his stark, soulful verse. But the son of Jewish Ukrainian immigrants also personified the tragedy suffered by thousands of Argentinian families under the 1976-1983 military dictatorship.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
In a television interview to be aired tonight, Russian Republic President Boris N. Yeltsin says Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev should abandon "his attempts to set up a dictatorship" or resign. Yeltsin says in the "20/20" interview with ABC's Barbara Walters that, if Gorbachev continues his move to the right, four republics--Russia, the Ukraine, Byelorussia and Kazakhstan--would unite and set up a union.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
After months of bitter fighting over the future of computer maker Dell Inc., Carl Icahn said in a sharply worded letter Monday that he was giving up.  That appears to clear the way for Chief Executive Michael Dell to take the company he founded private during a shareholder vote set for Thursday. But Icahn didn't go quietly. He directed some final jabs at Michael Dell, reiterating that he still thought the founder's buyout offer was too low, and compared the company's board -- which postponed the shareholder vote numerous times and changed the voting rules to better Michael Dell's takeover chances -- to a dictatorship.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and the U.S. Congress, while seeming to disagree on China policy, are actually united in an attempt to bring about the collapse of Chinese communism, asserts an internal party analysis leaked to reporters here Tuesday. To hold on to power in the face of such Western pressure, the document says, the Communist Party must enforce its dictatorship and fight internal supporters of democratic socialism.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese Communist Party, in a major policy statement released Monday, said it will gradually free most prices and institute other market-oriented reforms but will not tolerate any transformation to capitalism or challenge to communist rule. The document, approved last month at a closed meeting of the party's Central Committee, broadly endorses the two basic policies of market-oriented economic reform and strict political dictatorship followed since 1979 under senior leader Deng Xiaoping.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a country where the Parliament is packed with gangsters and avowed fascists, it came as little surprise when an opposition legislator was knocked out cold by a fellow deputy after speaking irreverently of the Belgrade regime. The blow that flattened federal deputy Mihajlo Markovic was the first provocative punch in what many opposition leaders expect to be a deadly civil war to rid Serbia of an entrenched, ruinous ruler.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN and NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ultimate rumor blew through Jordan on Sunday with the force of credibility: Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was dead. His voice had not been heard over Baghdad Radio since last Tuesday, the third day of the ground war, nor had he been seen in public. His army in the south was crushed. Retreating columns had brought chaos to the streets of Basra, the southern Iraqi city where scenes of revolt were reported.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | DAN FISHER and HARRY TRIMBORN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He basked as sycophants proclaimed him the "Genius of the Carpathians," but Nicolae Ceausescu will be remembered instead as the doddering tyrant whose incomprehensible belief that he could stay the same while all around him changed finally cost him his life. Even as he carefully crafted an image of independence from his neighbors in what used to be called the Soviet Bloc, the longtime Romanian leader built a family dynasty and ruthlessly insisted on unquestioning obedience from his own subjects.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Spanish Judge Baltasar Garzon wants to question former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger about crimes committed during the military dictatorships in South American countries in the 1970s and '80s. Garzon, who has been investigating rights abuses during Chilean Gen. Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship, has filed a request with British authorities to allow him to question Kissinger when he arrives for a convention, said Juan Garces, a lawyer in the Pinochet probe.
WORLD
April 10, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Anila Rubiku grew up in a country that no longer exists, at least not the isolated, repressed and paranoid state that was Albania before Eastern Europe's anti-Communist revolutions. The Balkan country that broke away from its iron-fisted mentors in Moscow, Beijing and Belgrade to pursue an even more Stalinist path has changed dramatically in the two decades since democracy began making inroads. But the scars of despotism remain visible on the landscape and in the mentality of Albanians, tens of thousands of them having endured unimaginable brutality in “re-education camps” during the long post-World War II dictatorship of Enver Hoxha . Hoxha sowed fear among the 3 million inhabitants of his remote Adriatic Sea enclave with constant warnings of imminent invasion by Albania's real and imagined enemies.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Andres D'Alessandro and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BUENOS AIRES - The man who is now Pope Francis was a young Jesuit leader, not long out of seminary, when Argentina's military junta unleashed a reign of terror that became known as the "dirty war. " That was more than 30 years ago, but the reaction to the naming of the first Argentine pope shows that the wounds have not yet healed. Many Argentines were still stunned Thursday that Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires, had become the first pope from the Americas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The sex lives of modern cities - Berlin in the 1920s, New York or San Francisco in the 1970s - tend to be characterized in terms of underground cabarets and over-the-top discos, of fast times fueled by carefree hedonism. But the sex life of the Belarusian capital of Minsk, as conceived by the Belarus Free Theatre, is about something less flashy and more fundamental. Human identity and freedom, as seen through the prism of sexuality, are the central concerns of "Minsk, 2011: A Reply to Kathy Acker," which will play Thursday through Saturday as part of the Off Center Festival of the Segerstrom Center for the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Many films are adapted from popular books, but few actually capture the tactile, emotional activities of writing and reading. In "Bonsái," the second feature from Chilean writer-director Cristián Jiménez, love, literature, memory and a bit of botany intertwine to form a tender, bittersweet romance based on the novel by Alejandro Zambra. "Bonsái," which recently opened in limited release in Los Angeles, begins as a young literature student named Julio (Diego Noguera) embarks on a romance with Emilia (Natalia Galgani)
WORLD
January 5, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
Vera Paiva has spent four decades trying to find out what happened to her father after he was arrested in 1971 during Brazil's military dictatorship. Rubens Paiva, a former congressman, is one of the country's most famous desaparecidos, or "disappeared ones," whose cases finally will be investigated by the government. "The last time we heard of anyone seeing him, he was inside the jail and had been barbarically tortured," Vera Paiva said, sitting in her house in Sao Paulo and going through details she has told journalists and officials hundreds of times.
WORLD
September 13, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A struggle between secular politicians and Islamists seeking to define the character of the new Libya burst into the open Tuesday, highlighting the challenge authorities face with reconciling demands repressed for decades by Moammar Kadafi that are now suddenly coming to the surface. Even as the Transitional National Council tries to establish itself in the capital, restore Libya's oil industry and public order, and crush remaining pockets of support for Kadafi, Islamists have focused their ire on Mahmoud Jibril, a U.S.-educated political scientist who is serving as de facto prime minister.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the infamous "Case of the Engineers," the crime of Enrik Veizi and three other oil exploration experts was having the cheek to tell the government that it was drilling for oil in an area where it was known there was none. For challenging the leadership's wisdom, they were tortured into confessing to sabotage and spying. A court condemned them to 25 years in prison, extolling the leniency that let them escape with their lives.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston, who recently announced his candidacy for reelection by urging the United States to oppose dictatorships of the anti-Communist right as well as the pro-Soviet left, said Saturday that he was pleased to see President Reagan now switch to his point of view. "I like what the President had to say," Cranston said, referring to a shift of emphasis regarding dictatorships announced by Reagan on Friday.
WORLD
April 16, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The unassuming whitewashed building is crammed full of explosive material potentially more damaging, or vital, to Tunisia's democratic experiment than any incendiary device. The structure is not an armory packed with weapons. It houses the long-secret archives of the country's once-dreaded Interior Ministry. "Stop, right there!" a plainclothes security officer, seemingly appearing out of nowhere, said to a pair of journalists approaching the entrance in a rundown section of old Tunis.
OPINION
February 20, 2011
INTRO: In 1993, an American political scientist named Gene Sharp wrote an 88-page guide to nonviolent revolution, " From Dictatorship to Democracy: A Conceptual Framework for Liberation . " Now translated into more than 30 languages (by Sharp's count), and available for download at his website , the plainspoken book found its way from Burma Myanmar to the Balkans and beyond. A retired U.S. Army colonel, who encountered the text while a fellow at Harvard University, introduced it to activists in Serbia, some of whom went on to spark the overthrow of Slobodan Milosevic in 2000.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|