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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
VATICAN CITY -- The Vatican has issued a dictionary of definitions aimed at clearing up ambiguity about Roman Catholic thought on sexuality and bioethics. The Vatican Congregation for the Family began quietly distributing its 867-page, Italian-language "Lexicon" to bookshops this week. It did not follow the usual Vatican procedure of calling a news conference to introduce and explain the work. The book is expected eventually to be translated into English and other languages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
Standing in front of nearly 1,000 Canoga Park students assembled in his honor Tuesday, Bob French admitted he felt a bit like Santa Claus. It wasn't hard to see why. The burly member of Canoga Park's Elks Lodge came to Limerick Avenue Elementary School to donate a set of brand-new dictionaries to the school and said he's letting his beard grow to portray St. Nick next month.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivering the final word in a monthlong trial, a federal court jury Tuesday awarded Merriam-Webster Co. nearly $2.3 million after finding that Random House had damaged Merriam by issuing a volume confusingly similar to Merriam's "Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2005 | Stephen Kiehl, Baltimore Sun
Seeking more "street cred" (n. popularity with or acceptance by the common people), Webster's New World College Dictionary has added almost 80 new words and definitions, an update that reflects the nation's current obsessions, from Al Qaeda and WMD on one hand to Botox and LASIK on the other. The 1,700-page dictionary is updated every year as editors try to keep pace with a constantly evolving language and include what they deem the "breakout" (adj.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The uninitiated may understandably wonder what all the fuss is about. Here's novelist Anthony Burgess calling it "the greatest publishing event of the century." It is to be marked by a half-day seminar and lunch at that bluest of blue-blood London hostelries, Claridge's. The guest list of 250 dignitaries is a literary "Who's Who."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1998 | JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scholar and author of a trilingual dictionary--who would have imagined it? Certainly not Felipe Lopez, a native of Mexico who did not know how to speak Spanish, let alone English, when he illegally crossed the U.S.-Mexican border 20 years ago. On that warm September night, Lopez concentrated only on not getting caught by the Border Patrol.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1996 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In just a few fleeting seconds, they can undercut everything, halting conversations, disrupting workouts and intensifying already hellish commutes. Worse, they can render beats and melodies monotonous and transform "Don't Be Cruel" from a lover's appeal to a fan's plea for leniency. They are sickening song lyrics--and an editor at a Van Nuys publishing house thinks he has found the cure. Identifying flawed rhymes as the source of the trouble, writer and musician Kevin M.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listen up. If you're not a narb (square) or an abb (abnormal), you'll want to speak the King's (oops, Monarch's) English in a politically correct, bias-free, po-mo (postmodern) way. You will not call your pooch a pet but an animal companion. You will not call Whoopi Goldberg an actress; she's an actor. You will not say master bedroom, master key, mastermind or master anything--these are sexist concepts.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
For a dozen years, Elizabeth Girsch visited a world last seen 600 years ago. Knights roamed. The Black Plague felled a third of England's population. Beheadings were common. And surgeries, even for cataracts, were done on liquored-up patients held down by strong assistants. The few literate people of the Middle Ages recorded all that and more in their cryptic writings. But for all the allure of these ancient images, it was the words themselves that held Girsch in thrall.
MAGAZINE
June 5, 1994 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a contributing editor for Health magazine. Her last story for this magazine was "Grunge R Us," a lament for the disappearing counterculture
Patients walk into Peter Breggin's office and lay their diagnoses on the couch: They're depressed. They're anxious. They're sure they have a measurable, palpable illness, with shape, substance, gravity, consistency. "A little boy came in with his parents and I asked him: 'Do you know why you're here?' " Breggin says. " 'Yes. I'm here because you're the doctor who doesn't believe I should take Ritalin for my ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder).'
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