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Dieter Zetsche

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BUSINESS
July 29, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Juergen Schrempp, the German auto executive who engineered Daimler-Benz's 1998 takeover of Chrysler Corp., announced his resignation Thursday in what some analysts said was a stunning repudiation of his leadership. Schrempp will step down as DaimlerChrysler's chief executive Dec. 31. His replacement is Dieter Zetsche, 52, a Daimler veteran who has run U.S.-based Chrysler Group since 2000 and is credited with reviving its fortunes.
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BUSINESS
April 5, 2007 | Christian Retzlaff and Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writers
When DaimlerChrysler Chairman Dieter Zetsche arrived at the automaker's annual meeting here Wednesday, he made a point of posing for photographs with a red Chrysler-built Avenger. It was a gesture both obvious and inscrutable. Zetsche created a stir in mid-February when he announced that all options were on the table concerning the future of Chrysler Group, the money-losing American automaker acquired by Daimler for $36 billion in 1998.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 2004 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Dieter Zetsche is Chrysler's comeback kid. Two years ago, DaimlerChrysler dispatched a cadre of former Mercedes-Benz executives to its Chrysler Group, which had been struggling. Zetsche, 51, headed the turnaround team as the U.S. unit's chief executive. He pressed employees to boost productivity and suppliers to slash prices, and told anyone who would listen that exciting vehicles would be the carmaker's salvation.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
DaimlerChrysler, the world's fifth-largest carmaker, plans to eliminate 6,000 administrative jobs as new Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche deepens cost cuts. The maker of Mercedes and Chrysler sedans will save 1.5 billion euros ($1.8 billion) a year with the latest reductions, Zetsche said Tuesday. The move will cost Stuttgart, Germany-based DaimlerChrysler 2 billion euros and comes after Zetsche cut 8,500 manufacturing positions at Mercedes.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just one day after announcing he would eliminate hundreds of millions of dollars in dealership advertising and showroom subsidies, Dieter Zetsche, Chrysler Group's recently named chief executive, faced an angry audience of about 80 Los Angeles-area Chrysler dealers. Many were indignant about the subsidies being taken away from them. "It was extremely hostile," Clay James, owner of Huntington Beach Dodge, recalls of the Jan. 30 meeting at the Renaissance Hotel near the airport.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
The wife of incoming DaimlerChrysler Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche was charged in what police say was a party at which more than 20 underage drinkers were ticketed. Gisela Zetsche, 55, had been scheduled to appear in court Thursday, but that hearing was adjourned until Sept. 13. She faces a $500 fine if convicted of the charge, having an open house party. Dieter Zetsche was not at home during the party, a Chrysler spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with staggering losses and employees' plummeting morale, Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche pledged Tuesday to turn Chrysler back into "a lean and mean" company that makes good money and is brimming with exciting cars and trucks. Zetsche, the first German to head the Chrysler side of DaimlerChrysler's business, said his top priority is to return to profitability by slashing costs and becoming more nimble.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2007 | Christian Retzlaff and Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writers
When DaimlerChrysler Chairman Dieter Zetsche arrived at the automaker's annual meeting here Wednesday, he made a point of posing for photographs with a red Chrysler-built Avenger. It was a gesture both obvious and inscrutable. Zetsche created a stir in mid-February when he announced that all options were on the table concerning the future of Chrysler Group, the money-losing American automaker acquired by Daimler for $36 billion in 1998.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
DaimlerChrysler, the world's fifth-largest carmaker, plans to eliminate 6,000 administrative jobs as new Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche deepens cost cuts. The maker of Mercedes and Chrysler sedans will save 1.5 billion euros ($1.8 billion) a year with the latest reductions, Zetsche said Tuesday. The move will cost Stuttgart, Germany-based DaimlerChrysler 2 billion euros and comes after Zetsche cut 8,500 manufacturing positions at Mercedes.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
DaimlerChrysler Chairman Dieter Zetsche will announce plans to sell its micro Smart two-seater car in the United States next year, a company executive said. Zetsche is scheduled to meet with reporters today to make the announcement at the Detroit Athletic Club, the executive said.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
The wife of incoming DaimlerChrysler Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche was charged in what police say was a party at which more than 20 underage drinkers were ticketed. Gisela Zetsche, 55, had been scheduled to appear in court Thursday, but that hearing was adjourned until Sept. 13. She faces a $500 fine if convicted of the charge, having an open house party. Dieter Zetsche was not at home during the party, a Chrysler spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Juergen Schrempp, the German auto executive who engineered Daimler-Benz's 1998 takeover of Chrysler Corp., announced his resignation Thursday in what some analysts said was a stunning repudiation of his leadership. Schrempp will step down as DaimlerChrysler's chief executive Dec. 31. His replacement is Dieter Zetsche, 52, a Daimler veteran who has run U.S.-based Chrysler Group since 2000 and is credited with reviving its fortunes.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2004 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Dieter Zetsche is Chrysler's comeback kid. Two years ago, DaimlerChrysler dispatched a cadre of former Mercedes-Benz executives to its Chrysler Group, which had been struggling. Zetsche, 51, headed the turnaround team as the U.S. unit's chief executive. He pressed employees to boost productivity and suppliers to slash prices, and told anyone who would listen that exciting vehicles would be the carmaker's salvation.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just one day after announcing he would eliminate hundreds of millions of dollars in dealership advertising and showroom subsidies, Dieter Zetsche, Chrysler Group's recently named chief executive, faced an angry audience of about 80 Los Angeles-area Chrysler dealers. Many were indignant about the subsidies being taken away from them. "It was extremely hostile," Clay James, owner of Huntington Beach Dodge, recalls of the Jan. 30 meeting at the Renaissance Hotel near the airport.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with staggering losses and employees' plummeting morale, Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche pledged Tuesday to turn Chrysler back into "a lean and mean" company that makes good money and is brimming with exciting cars and trucks. Zetsche, the first German to head the Chrysler side of DaimlerChrysler's business, said his top priority is to return to profitability by slashing costs and becoming more nimble.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
DaimlerChrysler is near a decision on whether to launch its ultra-compact Smart car in the United States, the company's chief executive said. "We'll make a decision on the issue in June," Dieter Zetsche said. The German-American automaker has said that it thinks it could sell at least 20,000 of its tiny Smart ForTwo models annually in the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
DaimlerChrysler's incoming chief executive, Dieter Zetsche, said he had "strong indications" that the company would reach a healthcare agreement with its unions similar to a deal that Big Three rival General Motors Corp. had negotiated. The German-U.S. automaker's Chrysler Group has established "first contacts" with the United Auto Workers, which represents 53,235 of the company's employees, Zetsche said. He said Chrysler, the No. 3 U.S.
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