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Dieting

HEALTH
November 29, 2013 | By James S. Fell
Fitness comes in all shapes, sizes and ages. Lou Dobbs, 68, is the host of Fox Business Network's "Lou Dobbs Tonight," and he has sometimes struggled with his weight during a busy broadcasting career that has spanned more than four decades. Before hitting the airwaves, Dobbs was a football-playing farm boy who never had to worry about his weight because he was always on the move. But later, career demands derailed both his exercise regimen and his diet. With the help of his wife, he took control again.
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HEALTH
October 26, 2013 | By Vincent Boucher
In the last 35 years, Harry Hamlin has been in and out of the spotlight; the heartthrob, toga-clad Perseus in "Clash of the Titans" in the early 1980s reigned over prime time as hunky lead attorney Michael Kuzak on "L.A. Law" in the mid-'80s. (Equally hunky off-screen, he was People magazine's "Sexiest Man Alive" in 1987.) Returning to TV in recent years, Hamlin at 61 was the Emmy-nominated devious ad boss Jim Cutler on "Mad Men. " Have you heard that someone online said you're Hollywood's most persevering actor?
HEALTH
October 26, 2013 | By Chris Woolston
In cookbooks, health food stores and alternative health clinics, the word is getting out: Acid is the latest dietary villain. It's not necessarily the acid in foods like tomatoes and lemons that supposedly cause the trouble. Instead, a growing number of people claim that meats, wheat, soda, coffee, alcohol and processed foods of all sorts produce acid in the body after they've been digested. The acid, in turn, is said to fuel health problems including arthritis, obesity and cancer.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
While diet and exercise are available to all, bariatric surgery is likely to remain a solution available to just a small fraction of the 90 million Americans who are obese. But when it comes to inducing weight loss and improving obesity-related health conditions, a new study has found that there really is no contest between the two: Procedures such as gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding beat diet and exercise. By a long shot. A new study published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal finds that among subjects followed for at least six months and as long as two years, those who got weight-loss surgery lost on average 57 more pounds than those in nonsurgical weight programs.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Carla Hall
Motor Avenue in Los Angeles went on a “road diet.” I certainly didn't think it needed to slim down. Twice a week I zipped from Palms Boulevard to Venice Boulevard, using either of the two southbound lanes on Motor to pass cars and get to my Pilates studio faster. When you're slogging through early evening rush-hour traffic trying to arrive on time at an exercise session you've already paid dearly for, speed is of the essence. So I was surprised one night to discover that Motor had lost a lane of traffic.
SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | Chris Dufresne
Unbuckling the mailbag: Question: I hope you and the media start a campaign to stop the NCAA scheduling these massacre football games. It is a scam, a sham and a shame. . . . Urban Meyer has the guts leading, 55-0, to go for it on fourth and six? He should be suspended for a game for that humiliation. Bobby Herbeck Answer: I'll start the campaign about these silly "paycheck" games, but first things first: You owe the Ohio State coach a big apology. Meyer did not - I repeat, did NOT - allow his team to "go for it" on fourth and six with the Buckeyes leading, 55-0, last week against Florida A&M. Ohio State was up only 48-0 at the time, and it was fourth and five.
HEALTH
September 14, 2013 | Emily Dwass
Is what we eat eating away at us? Millions of Americans have reflux disease, with symptoms ranging from annoying to dangerous, and experts believe our diet is a major factor. Reflux is partly a matter of stomach acid moving upward to where it doesn't belong. But a leading researcher, Dr. Jamie Koufman, says an even bigger threat is the digestive enzyme pepsin, which lingers in the esophagus and throat where it is activated by acidic foods and beverages. She preaches that we need to change what, how and when we eat. Koufman, the director of the Voice Institute of New York, says many people have no idea that reflux is behind their health problems.
HEALTH
August 2, 2013 | By Judy Mandell
Joseph J. Colella has performed more than 4,000 weight-loss surgeries. But the bariatric surgeon at St. Margaret's Hospital at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center would like to keep people from needing the OR by finding practical strategies to keep obesity at bay. We talked with him about fiber. Is a high-fiber diet important for weight loss? The conventional wisdom is that a diet high in fiber is important for weight loss and overall weight management. While there is some general truth to this, the reality is that the priority of a high-fiber diet in the weight loss solution is far from the top of the list.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
The Tyrannosaurus rex of "Jurassic Park" fame chases any prey that moves, then devours it with a bone-crushing gnash of its enormous jaws and serrated teeth. But paleontologists don't necessarily back Steven Spielberg's portrayal of T. rex , with some saying it may have simply scavenged the remains of dead animals it happened to find. Now scientists have unearthed what they say is the first direct evidence that the dinosaur king hunted its prey, further supporting its reign at the top of the Cretaceous food chain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
Bryan Piperno was just 9 years old when he began keeping his secret. The Simi Valley youngster tossed out lunches or claimed he ate elsewhere. As he grew older, he started purging after eating. Even after his vomiting landed him in the emergency room during college, he lied to hide the truth. Piperno, now 25, slowly fended off his eating disorder with time and care, including a stay in a residential treatment facility. But surveys show a rising number of teenage boys in Los Angeles now struggle with similar problems.
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