Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDigestive Tract
IN THE NEWS

Digestive Tract

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2007 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
A Colorado wine merchant was sentenced Monday to two years' house arrest and five years' probation after pleading guilty to federal fraud charges for bilking clients out of millions of dollars for wine futures that he never delivered. Prosecutors asked for a sentence of seven to nine years in federal prison. But attorneys for Ronald Wallace, 49, who has Crohn's disease, argued that he was too sick to be treated in prison. U.S. District Judge Consuelo Marshall agreed. She ordered him to pay $11.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
A condor recently released after treatment for lead poisoning was winging her way north Friday toward her old foraging ground, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said. The huge endangered bird, known as AC8, is at least 30 years old, which makes her one of the last known condors to be raised in the wild, said Greg Austin, a scientist with the service's condor recovery project.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | United Press International
After two delays because of stomach problems, William S. Sessions, the West Texas judge hailed for his tough but fair stance against crime, was sworn in today as the fourth director of the FBI. At a ceremony at FBI headquarters, Sessions, flanked by President Reagan and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, was saluted as he took over the helm of the law enforcement agency, replacing William H. Webster, who now heads the CIA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001
A type of immune system cell that treats certain foods as germs rather than nourishment is the culprit behind many food allergies, Ohio researchers reported in the April issue of Nature Immunology. The finding could lead to better treatment for millions of people. Researchers used mice to pin the blame on white blood cells called eosinophils, which are packed with powerful proteins that, when released, destroy surrounding tissues and help rally other immune cells to infection sites.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | SUSAN CARPENTER
We all scream for ice cream, but Eric Spitznagel would do almost anything for cookies, candy, cereal, coffee, cola, doughnuts and gum, or so it would seem from reading his new book, "The Junk Food Companion" (Dutton). A few fun facts from his guide to eating badly: 1. Name of the first commercial chocolate bar sold in the United States. 2. Number of licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll. 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997
Injections of an antibody that targets a natural human protein are showing promise in hard-to-treat cases of Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive illness. The treatment involves injections of an antibody called cA2. It neutralizes a protein known as tumor necrosis factor that is believed to play a role in causing Crohn's disease. The study is published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The treatment, which has not been approved for routine use, was developed by Centocor Inc.
HEALTH
March 25, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL
We recently learned that the inventor of Life Savers candies was inspired, in the early 20th century, to make his candy after witnessing a pharmacist make pills with an old-fashioned pill machine. All very fine and creative. But who, we'd like to know, invented pills? Someone way, way back when, says George Griffenhagen, a retired pharmacist with a penchant for history who resides in Vienna, Va. (Griffenhagen has made quite a study of the pill question. He's even written about pill history.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Bits and pieces of "biological dirt" from inside people's colons are being left on three in 20 of the instruments inserted in people's rectums to examine their lower digestive tract, according to a study at five hospitals nationwide. "Three out of 20 is an unexpectedly high number of endoscopes failing a cleanliness criterion," said Marco Bommarito, an investigator with 3M's infection prevention division, which conducted the study. "Clearly, we'd like no endoscopes to fail a cleanliness rating.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Michelle O'Malley knows good horse poop when she sees it. While at MIT, the chemical engineer scooped up some manure from Finn, a grass-fed horse at a sustainable farm in Concord, Mass. That offal has led to a potential breakthrough in turning grasses and nonfood crops into an alternative fuel in attempts to wean motorists from fossil fuels and stem man-made climate change. O'Malley, a chemical engineer at UC Santa Barbara, has isolated a fungus that could more easily unlock the sugars used to ferment ethanol.
HEALTH
November 30, 2009 | By Chris Woolston
Whether you're still plowing through Thanksgiving leftovers or easing back to your normal fare, billions of bacteria in your digestive tract are eagerly awaiting their next meal. And if you feed them well enough, they'll thank you by producing gas. Lots of products claim to help deflate that familiar gassy feeling and all that goes with it. And then there's Beano, a supplement from GlaxoSmithKline that supposedly "stops gas before it starts." Once available only in droppers, Beano is now sold in tablet form.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|