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Digestive Tract

November 2, 1987 | United Press International
After two delays because of stomach problems, William S. Sessions, the West Texas judge hailed for his tough but fair stance against crime, was sworn in today as the fourth director of the FBI. At a ceremony at FBI headquarters, Sessions, flanked by President Reagan and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, was saluted as he took over the helm of the law enforcement agency, replacing William H. Webster, who now heads the CIA.
October 9, 1997
Injections of an antibody that targets a natural human protein are showing promise in hard-to-treat cases of Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive illness. The treatment involves injections of an antibody called cA2. It neutralizes a protein known as tumor necrosis factor that is believed to play a role in causing Crohn's disease. The study is published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The treatment, which has not been approved for routine use, was developed by Centocor Inc.
March 29, 2001
A type of immune system cell that treats certain foods as germs rather than nourishment is the culprit behind many food allergies, Ohio researchers reported in the April issue of Nature Immunology. The finding could lead to better treatment for millions of people. Researchers used mice to pin the blame on white blood cells called eosinophils, which are packed with powerful proteins that, when released, destroy surrounding tissues and help rally other immune cells to infection sites.
June 6, 1999 | SUSAN CARPENTER
We all scream for ice cream, but Eric Spitznagel would do almost anything for cookies, candy, cereal, coffee, cola, doughnuts and gum, or so it would seem from reading his new book, "The Junk Food Companion" (Dutton). A few fun facts from his guide to eating badly: 1. Name of the first commercial chocolate bar sold in the United States. 2. Number of licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll. 3.
November 16, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
"Top Chef" host Padma Lakshmi is in the December issue of Playboy (on newsstands Nov. 20) wearing a lot of lace and not much else. In an interview, the 42-year-old single mom said she doesn't watch the Bravo cooking reality show that she has starred in for six years, and that she gains and loses the same 10 to 15 pounds every season. "I usually gain between 10 and 15 pounds over six weeks each season," Lakshmi said. "Then I spend 12 weeks working it off. But it's worth it. When the timer goes off and the food is ready, I'm really excited to eat. "I'm lucky.
May 18, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
A bee stung me and caused excruciating pain. My hand started inflating. A cut onion on the sting worked in 20 minutes to stop the swelling and ease the pain. We first heard about using a cut onion on a sting about 20 years ago. We checked with world-renowned onion chemist Dr. Eric Block of the State University of New York at Albany.
April 26, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I have been taking Benicar for hypertension for about three years. Now I have developed muscle and back pain. When I stop the Benicar, I don't have the pain. My other medications include estradiol, Celebrex and Nexium. My recent lab tests were normal, and Benicar controls my blood pressure well without any other side effects. What can you suggest? Benicar (olmesartan) is a type of blood pressure medicine called an ARB (angiotensin receptor blocker). Other drugs in this class include Atacand, Avapro, Cozaar, Diovan, Hyzaar, Micardis and Teveten.
August 7, 2013 | By David Ng
James Conlon, music director of Los Angeles Opera, will have surgery to have part of his colon removed. The 63-year-old conductor is suffering from an inflamed portion of his colon as a result of diverticulitis, the company said. The surgery, which will take place in New York, will force Conlon to miss scheduled performances at the Ravinia Festival on Aug. 17 and the La Jolla Music Society on Aug. 23. The conductor is scheduled to rest for three to four weeks following the procedure, according to his representative.
April 11, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Michelle O'Malley knows good horse poop when she sees it. While at MIT, the chemical engineer scooped up some manure from Finn, a grass-fed horse at a sustainable farm in Concord, Mass. That offal has led to a potential breakthrough in turning grasses and nonfood crops into an alternative fuel in attempts to wean motorists from fossil fuels and stem man-made climate change. O'Malley, a chemical engineer at UC Santa Barbara, has isolated a fungus that could more easily unlock the sugars used to ferment ethanol.
The stocky Colombian man of about 30 did not look much different from the other air crash victims at North Shore University Hospital as Dr. Robert J. Ward prepared to operate on him early Friday morning. Like other passengers of Avianca Flight 52, the man had suffered severe internal bleeding and numerous broken bones. But as the surgeon prepared to treat the intestinal wounds, he discovered round shadows shaped like suppositories on X-rays of the man's digestive system.
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