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Digestive Tract

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2007 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
A Colorado wine merchant was sentenced Monday to two years' house arrest and five years' probation after pleading guilty to federal fraud charges for bilking clients out of millions of dollars for wine futures that he never delivered. Prosecutors asked for a sentence of seven to nine years in federal prison. But attorneys for Ronald Wallace, 49, who has Crohn's disease, argued that he was too sick to be treated in prison. U.S. District Judge Consuelo Marshall agreed. She ordered him to pay $11.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
A condor recently released after treatment for lead poisoning was winging her way north Friday toward her old foraging ground, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said. The huge endangered bird, known as AC8, is at least 30 years old, which makes her one of the last known condors to be raised in the wild, said Greg Austin, a scientist with the service's condor recovery project.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | United Press International
After two delays because of stomach problems, William S. Sessions, the West Texas judge hailed for his tough but fair stance against crime, was sworn in today as the fourth director of the FBI. At a ceremony at FBI headquarters, Sessions, flanked by President Reagan and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, was saluted as he took over the helm of the law enforcement agency, replacing William H. Webster, who now heads the CIA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001
A type of immune system cell that treats certain foods as germs rather than nourishment is the culprit behind many food allergies, Ohio researchers reported in the April issue of Nature Immunology. The finding could lead to better treatment for millions of people. Researchers used mice to pin the blame on white blood cells called eosinophils, which are packed with powerful proteins that, when released, destroy surrounding tissues and help rally other immune cells to infection sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997
Injections of an antibody that targets a natural human protein are showing promise in hard-to-treat cases of Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive illness. The treatment involves injections of an antibody called cA2. It neutralizes a protein known as tumor necrosis factor that is believed to play a role in causing Crohn's disease. The study is published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The treatment, which has not been approved for routine use, was developed by Centocor Inc.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
"Top Chef" host Padma Lakshmi is in the December issue of Playboy (on newsstands Nov. 20) wearing a lot of lace and not much else. In an interview, the 42-year-old single mom said she doesn't watch the Bravo cooking reality show that she has starred in for six years, and that she gains and loses the same 10 to 15 pounds every season. "I usually gain between 10 and 15 pounds over six weeks each season," Lakshmi said. "Then I spend 12 weeks working it off. But it's worth it. When the timer goes off and the food is ready, I'm really excited to eat. "I'm lucky.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | SUSAN CARPENTER
We all scream for ice cream, but Eric Spitznagel would do almost anything for cookies, candy, cereal, coffee, cola, doughnuts and gum, or so it would seem from reading his new book, "The Junk Food Companion" (Dutton). A few fun facts from his guide to eating badly: 1. Name of the first commercial chocolate bar sold in the United States. 2. Number of licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll. 3.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Never one to mince words, investment poobah Warren Buffett described the U.S. healthcare system as a tapeworm in the digestive tract of the economy. This apt but disgusting metaphor does a good job of illustrating how our maddeningly dysfunctional healthcare system puts American businesses as a disadvantage compared with their overseas cousins. "The healthcare problem is the No. 1 problem of America and of American business," Buffett said in an interview with Bloomberg Television . "It's the tapeworm, essentially, of the American economy, and we have not dealt with that yet. Obamacare is a step in the right direction in many ways.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Bits and pieces of "biological dirt" from inside people's colons are being left on three in 20 of the instruments inserted in people's rectums to examine their lower digestive tract, according to a study at five hospitals nationwide. "Three out of 20 is an unexpectedly high number of endoscopes failing a cleanliness criterion," said Marco Bommarito, an investigator with 3M's infection prevention division, which conducted the study. "Clearly, we'd like no endoscopes to fail a cleanliness rating.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
As more people in Europe fall ill from an especially dangerous strain of E. coli, the germ’s worst-case complication, hemolytic uremic syndrome, is grabbing headlines. The condition , which can shut down the kidneys, is potentially fatal—as evidenced by the mounting death toll. Though most strains of E. coli are harmless, this particular outbreak appears to be caused by a virulent strain known as enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome in about 8% of those infected , often children.
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