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OPINION
September 7, 2013
Editing a letters page provides some insight into the random topics that push hot buttons you didn't know existed. While most of the commentary sent to letters@latimes.com focuses on the big-item issues of the day (a possible military strike on Syria drew the most letters for the second week in a row), occasionally a less weighty subject will prompt impassioned responses. For example, cursive. Reacting to The Times' editorial Wednesday warning that the "handwriting may be on the wall" for cursive instruction in schools, nearly a dozen readers rose to script's defense.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Ann Friedman
With every click, every tweet, every share, am I being exploited or am I taking advantage of the digital revolution? This is the question I kept asking myself as I read Astra Taylor's "The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. " Taylor makes a thorough case that the technological advances we've been told constitute progress - that anyone can start a blog, that we can easily keep up with our friends (and frenemies)...
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
Are you an ultra-modern new parent who wants to raise kids the tried-and-tested midcentury way? "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care," the bestselling child-rearing bible, will be available as an ebook starting next week, Skyhorse Publishing has announced. Dr. Spock's manual has sold more than 50 million copies and gone through nine editions since its initial publication in 1946; now parents can read it on Kindle, Nook or iPad. Three other Dr. Spock books have already made the ebook leap: "Dr. Spock's The School Years," "Dr. Spock's The First Two Years" and "Dr. Spock's Pregnancy Guide.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Lucian Grainge has a vision for the future of the music business that bears scant resemblance to the traditional record company playbook. He is putting songs on smartphones in Africa, reviving moribund American record labels and making Lorde into a Grammy-winning global sensation. Above all, he wants to forge new partnerships with his industry's erstwhile adversaries - the technology firms that have upended the way people get their music. Skeptics question whether anyone can reverse the decline of an industry that has seen global sales plummet from $28 billion in 1999 to $16.5 billion in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Ann Friedman
With every click, every tweet, every share, am I being exploited or am I taking advantage of the digital revolution? This is the question I kept asking myself as I read Astra Taylor's "The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. " Taylor makes a thorough case that the technological advances we've been told constitute progress - that anyone can start a blog, that we can easily keep up with our friends (and frenemies)...
OPINION
March 15, 2012
Two months after Eastman Kodak Co.declared bankruptcy, another household name is succumbing to the relentless march of technology. Encyclopaedia Britannica announced Tuesday that it is discontinuing its best-known product, the 32-volume collection of reference material on everything from aardvarks to zygotes. The company is shifting its focus to the Internet, where it offers a virtual version of its books and a slate of fee-based educational services. The company's ability to sell pricey bound volumes for 244 years is a testament not just to the power of its brand, but also to the demand for a convenient, reliable source of information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2011 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Newsstand owner Robert Kelly is well aware that he's not in the most profitable of businesses these days. But, at 58, he says it's too late to get out of the print business. Plus, he enjoys having a front-row seat to the comings and goings in Los Feliz. Kelly has become a fixture at the corner of Vermont and Melbourne avenues, where he has operated his newsstand for 11 years, greeting neighbors and regulars by name and instinctively reaching for their favorite magazine or newspaper when they approach.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
TULSA, Okla. - Jim Thavisay is secretly stalking one of his classmates. And one of them is spying on him. "I have an idea who it is, but I'm not 100% sure yet," said Thavisay, a 25-year-old former casino blackjack dealer. Stalking is part of the curriculum in the Cyber Corps, an unusual two-year program at the University of Tulsa that teaches students how to spy in cyberspace, the latest frontier in espionage. Students learn not only how to rifle through trash, sneak a tracking device on cars and plant false information on Facebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Playwright Sarah Ruhl is a proven practitioner whose buoyantly surreal plays are moored by cosmically serious themes. Pulitzer-nominated in 2005, Ruhl's “The Clean House” exploited a comical situation -- a Latina domestic worker's quest for the perfect joke -- to explore larger issues of death and loss. And in “Eurydice,” recently seen in a stellar production at A Noise Within, Ruhl slanted the Greek myth of Eurydice and Orpheus into a moving story of undying paternal love -- Ruhl's moving valedictory to her own dead father.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Dianne de Guzman
While the word "dig" in music terms refers more to when DJs would search through bins of old records for music to sample, in today's digital age that could just as well refer to CDs. While music can easily be downloaded without leaving the couch, a trip to the music store, searching for music and holding physical vinyl records or CDs still has a certain je ne sais quois that doesn't fade. Cyrena Hillyard was browsing through Amoeba Records on Sunset and took this photo with an iPhone 4S. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
It's Valentine's Day, and I'm not celebrating. A few weeks ago my fiancee and I broke up. It was a difficult breakup, so I immediately stopped following her on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and deleted her name from my iPhone address book. I thought that would be enough to disconnect her from my digital life. But I'm finding out - as many others have in the age of smartphones and social networks - that connecting is easy, but severing ties online is nearly impossible. Take even the basic task of doing an Internet search.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
A stage, a sound system, musicians and a crowd. That's all you really need to put on a concert. Everything else - $12 beer, nachos, jumbo video screens, light show, 3-D glasses, VIP meet-and-greets, merch, vapor pen for your "medical marijuana" - is gravy. Even the $75-million renovation of the Los Angeles Forum isn't going to guarantee a good show. As a rule in watching musicians at work, a smaller space is usually preferable. This is creative expression, and at its best it's the most intimate nonsexual exchange you can have with a stranger.
OPINION
December 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Six months after Edward Snowden revealed that the National Security Agency was indiscriminately collecting the phone records of Americans and holding on to them for years for possible use in terrorism investigations, a federal judge has rightly ruled that the program probably violates the 4th Amendment's ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. In a powerful opinion released Monday in Washington, U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon castigated what he called an "almost-Orwellian technology that enables the government to store and analyze the phone metadata of every telephone user in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Stan Sheldon places his blowtorch between two spinning glass tubes. He blows into a mouthpiece that looks like a cigarette perched on his bottom lip. Air enters one end of a tube and puffs up through smoldering, wilting glass. As the tubes appear near collapse, they fuse and bursts of light explode inside - tiny fireworks of blue, red and orange trying to escape. Sheldon is the last remaining glass blower at UC Riverside, where he designs and creates glassware strictly for scientific research on campus.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Leap Motion has announced a new app that allows users to digitally sculpt 3-D models using the company's innovative motion-sensor control. The San Francisco start-up said Free Form lets users shape digital figures on their computers by moving their hands and fingers above the Leap Motion Controller, which went on sale earlier this year. With Free Form, users can create models of all sorts of shapes, and when finished, they can save their figures and print them if they have access to a 3-D printer.
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