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Digital Age

ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Zachary Pincus-Roth
Some people take care of orchids. Others take care of guinea pigs. Barbara takes care of tropes. Most of the day she's a 51-year-old seamstress in Illinois and a caregiver for her husband. But in her spare time, Barbara tends to four tropes: "Cool Bike," "Badass Longcoat," "You Fail Logic Forever" and "Silly Reason for War." "They were a mess, they needed to be cleaned up, and nobody else was doing it, so I adopted them," she says. "It's equivalent of wiping down the sink every morning after I brush my teeth."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2005 | Randy Lewis
John Lennon's solo recordings will become available for digital downloading for the first time in early December. His music's entry into the Digital Age started Monday with "Working Class Hero," a new compilation of 38 solo hits and album tracks. "New technology is something he always embraced, and this is something he would have loved," Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, said in a statement released Monday.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Directors Guild of America said its members overwhelmingly endorsed a new three-year contract. The agreement, negotiated last month, replaces one that expires June 30 and secures gains for directors in the digital age, including doubling residuals for films and TV shows sold online and establishing payments for shows streamed free on the Web. The contract paved the way for a similar pact between studios and writers that ended a nearly 100-day...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Dianne de Guzman
While the word "dig" in music terms refers more to when DJs would search through bins of old records for music to sample, in today's digital age that could just as well refer to CDs. While music can easily be downloaded without leaving the couch, a trip to the music store, searching for music and holding physical vinyl records or CDs still has a certain je ne sais quois that doesn't fade. Cyrena Hillyard was browsing through Amoeba Records on Sunset and took this photo with an iPhone 4S. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Washington Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr. announced his retirement after 17 years in that role, making way for a new editor to lead the newspaper's transition into the digital age. Downie, 66, worked up the ranks as an investigative reporter and editor, London correspondent and national editor. He said that after his Sept. 8 departure he would stay on as a vice president at large at Washington Post Co., the same title held by his predecessor, Ben Bradlee. The Washington Post won many accolades during Downie's tenure, including 25 Pulitzer Prizes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In my inbox this week: Matthew Sharpe announces “a little experiment in self-publishing on the Internet”: a series of 12 weekly micro-fictions, under the name “Very short stories r us,” that showcase his idiosyncratic blend of the acutely observed and the fantastic. Sharpe is the author of a collection of stories and four novels, including the brilliant “Jamestown,” which reimagines the early 17th century Virginia settlement through the filter of contemporary dystopia, blurring the lines between history, fantasy, science fiction and satire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008 | David Greenwald, Special to The Times
Artists including Neil Young and Bob Dylan have made no secret of their distaste for digital sound. But Grammy-winning producer T Bone Burnett believes he's found a way to affordably give listeners an experience akin to hearing studio master tapes. Since last fall, Burnett, the mastermind behind such roots-oriented releases as the "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, has been working with a team of engineers on a high-fidelity audio system called Code. He's invested his own money -- he won't say how much -- to develop the new technology and has recruited industry veterans, including John Mellencamp and , to his cause.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
This season "Terra Nova" has exhumed the Cretaceous period, but can it also help resurrect another block of time that would seem equally challenging to revive — the family viewing hour? The heavily promoted prime-time show, dubbed internally at Fox as "Little House on the Prairie with Dinosaurs," is an eco-action-adventure series built around a family of five that travels back 85 million years to give humans a second chance at caring for Earth. The ratings have been solid for the show, which counts Steven Spielberg and former News Corp.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | From Reuters
He talks about computer bits replacing human atoms in communications and world trade, but multimedia guru Nicholas Negroponte believes the dawning digital age will make workers more creative. "The change from atoms to bits is irrevocable and unstoppable," says Negroponte, head of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's futuristic Media Lab and author of a new book, "Being Digital" (Alfred Knopf). In an interview at the Media Lab--a white modernist cube designed by I.M.
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