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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Streaming music pioneer Rhapsody, one of the first digital music companies to offer access to songs through monthly subscriptions, has cut its staff by 15%. Also, its president, Jon Irwin, is stepping down and will continue as a strategic advisor.  Rhapsody International, the service's parent, said Monday that the layoffs were concurrent with New York investment firm Columbus Nova Technology Partners' taking a large share in the company....
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BUSINESS
January 8, 2008 | Alex Veiga, The Associated Press
When you're not inclined to give away your product for free, make your customers believe that they're getting something for nothing. That's the thinking behind some of the offerings music fans may see this year as the recording industry scrambles to offset losses from plunging CD sales and find new sources of revenue when many people simply download music for free.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IBM is expected today to unveil what is being billed as a pirate-proof music delivery system that will enable consumers to download recordings at home through high-speed cable lines. IBM will demonstrate the technology this morning at a news conference in New York and launch a six-month test involving a sample of cable subscribers in San Diego, sources said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
When is 13 a lucky number? When it's the number of years it's taken for the music industry to post its first yearly increase in global recorded music sales, which is what happened in 2012, according to new figures from the International Federation for the Phonographic Industry . The group's annual Digital Music Report , issued Feb. 26 in London, noted that overall music sales rose from $16.2 billion to $16.5 billion, or 0.3%, from 2011...
BUSINESS
March 20, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Consumers might have the option to pay a higher price for iPods and iPhones in the future and get unlimited access to a music library, according to record industry executives who say they have had preliminary conversations with Apple Inc., the manufacturer of those devices. That would mark a change in strategy for Apple. A year ago, Chief Executive Steve Jobs said he didn't believe most consumers wanted to rent their music and that Apple had no plans to offer a music subscription service.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. faces major challenges as it readies a portable music player and service to take on Apple Computer Inc.'s popular iPod, analysts said Sunday. The device, the first of a family of hardware and software products under the new Zune brand, is expected to ship by year's end and represents a fundamental shift for the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2007 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
Digital music, Bluetooth-enabled cellphone, text messages you can hear -- all in one integrated package. The latest pricey gadget from Apple? Nope, it's the latest car from Ford Motor Co. The automaker, in partnership with Microsoft Corp., is rolling out what it hopes will be a game changer in the world of mobile connectivity.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2008 | Michelle Quinn
A sigh of relief could be heard in digital music land Thursday as the federal Copyright Royalty Board left unchanged the rate for royalties paid to songwriters and publishers for CDs and digital downloads. The ruling is the first time that the board formally set the digital download rate. Previously, because there was no formal rate for downloads, companies such as Apple Inc. had used the CD rate -- a 9.1-cent payment to the songwriter and/or publisher for every track sold through iTunes and other download stores.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2008 | Michelle Quinn and Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writers
Going to the mall to buy music may no longer be a rite of passage for adolescents. For the first time last year, nearly half of all teenagers bought no compact discs, a dramatic increase from 2006, when 38% of teens shunned such purchases, according to a new report released Tuesday. The illegal sharing of music online continued to soar in 2007, but there was one sign of hope that legal downloading was picking up steam. In the last year, Apple Inc.'
BUSINESS
October 29, 2009 | Alex Pham
Google Inc. started out 13 years ago as a simple search engine, but it has grown into a behemoth that has shaken up dozens of industries, including computers and cellphones. On Wednesday, it jumped into the music industry. The Mountain View, Calif., Internet giant unveiled a music search feature that lets users play millions of songs for free with an option to buy or rent them from several online music stores. Although not a direct threat to Apple Inc.'s hugely popular iTunes store, the new feature is expected to bolster the music services that compete with iTunes.
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