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Digital Technology

OPINION
January 8, 2012
Every revolution has elements of tragedy as well as triumphs — even the bloodless revolutions in the way people earn a living. Economist Joseph Schumpeter called it "creative destruction," the entrepreneurial-driven process that "incessantly revolutionizes the economic structure from within, incessantly destroying the old one, incessantly creating a new one. " Such a process was set in motion by digital technology, which released information from...
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
What has Michael Moore - and digital technology - wrought? Now anyone with a political agenda and low-cost digital camera can make a movie and call it a documentary. Even enterprises that at best are vanity projects and at worst badly disguised and overly long attack ads are taken seriously by audiences - and box-office observers. That is precisely the shape of things in "2016: Obama's America," which promises to demystify the president - "Love him, hate him, now you know him" is one of its tag lines - but does more to illuminate its filmmaker, Dinesh D'Souza, and his ego instead.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the week before the biggest TV-viewing day of the year, DirecTV launched an unprecedented electronic attack on an estimated 100,000 consumers who had been bootlegging its satellite TV service. The El Segundo-based company killed--via satellite--pirated pieces of hardware that had enabled viewers in the U.S. and abroad to see a broad range of programming, including premium channels and pay-per-view events that they had not paid for.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2004 | From Reuters
Britain took aim at the ubiquitous Hollywood blockbuster Monday by enlisting the latest digital technology to broaden the reach of independent films that often struggle to win wide distribution. The UK Film Council, a government-funded body, said it planned to equip 150 theaters across the country with digital projectors in exchange for a guarantee that the equipment will be used to show smaller-budget, foreign and classic films. Only nine have that capacity now.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
The nation's 1,600 TV stations each got a new channel assignment from federal regulators for the digital broadcasts some will begin airing by next Christmas. Broadcasters were studying the inches-thick chart to ensure that the licenses they're getting--which will replace the ones they use today by 2006--replicate the broadcast area their current licenses cover.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could lead to changes in the way Americans watch television, five major Hollywood studios have agreed on an anti-piracy technology designed to protect digital movies and other forms of video entertainment from theft. The move could speed the replacement of old analog TVs and cable set-top boxes and bring VCRs with new devices that can unscramble, record and store encrypted digital programming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000
The city will get a $3-million federal grant to train entertainment industry union workers for high-tech jobs and skills, the U.S. Department of Labor announced this week. The grant will train approximately 1,500 members of 20 entertainment industry unions that belong to the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts (IATSE).
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to steal a march on the incursion of digital technology into its core businesses, Time Warner Inc. said Wednesday that it will set up a $500-million fund to invest in new media and other emerging high-tech companies. Half of that sum will represent advertising and promotional time on Time Warner cable and print media, which include Cable News Network, Home Box Office and the Cartoon Network, and Time, Sports Illustrated, Fortune and People magazines. The rest will be in cash.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1997 | (Karen Kaplan)
After months of preparation, Pacific Telesis Group's Pacific Bell Mobile Services expects to launch its PCS wireless phone service in Southern California on Thursday. PCS--personal communications service--is an all-digital offering that works on special phones and is designed to compete with traditional analog cellular service. Both PCS and advanced digital cellular networks can send pages and short messages to phones in addition to voice calls.
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