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Digital Technology

ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
What has Michael Moore - and digital technology - wrought? Now anyone with a political agenda and low-cost digital camera can make a movie and call it a documentary. Even enterprises that at best are vanity projects and at worst badly disguised and overly long attack ads are taken seriously by audiences - and box-office observers. That is precisely the shape of things in "2016: Obama's America," which promises to demystify the president - "Love him, hate him, now you know him" is one of its tag lines - but does more to illuminate its filmmaker, Dinesh D'Souza, and his ego instead.
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NEWS
January 27, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the week before the biggest TV-viewing day of the year, DirecTV launched an unprecedented electronic attack on an estimated 100,000 consumers who had been bootlegging its satellite TV service. The El Segundo-based company killed--via satellite--pirated pieces of hardware that had enabled viewers in the U.S. and abroad to see a broad range of programming, including premium channels and pay-per-view events that they had not paid for.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2004 | From Reuters
Britain took aim at the ubiquitous Hollywood blockbuster Monday by enlisting the latest digital technology to broaden the reach of independent films that often struggle to win wide distribution. The UK Film Council, a government-funded body, said it planned to equip 150 theaters across the country with digital projectors in exchange for a guarantee that the equipment will be used to show smaller-budget, foreign and classic films. Only nine have that capacity now.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
The nation's 1,600 TV stations each got a new channel assignment from federal regulators for the digital broadcasts some will begin airing by next Christmas. Broadcasters were studying the inches-thick chart to ensure that the licenses they're getting--which will replace the ones they use today by 2006--replicate the broadcast area their current licenses cover.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could lead to changes in the way Americans watch television, five major Hollywood studios have agreed on an anti-piracy technology designed to protect digital movies and other forms of video entertainment from theft. The move could speed the replacement of old analog TVs and cable set-top boxes and bring VCRs with new devices that can unscramble, record and store encrypted digital programming.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1997 | (Karen Kaplan)
After months of preparation, Pacific Telesis Group's Pacific Bell Mobile Services expects to launch its PCS wireless phone service in Southern California on Thursday. PCS--personal communications service--is an all-digital offering that works on special phones and is designed to compete with traditional analog cellular service. Both PCS and advanced digital cellular networks can send pages and short messages to phones in addition to voice calls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Lucy Hood, a well-regarded entertainment industry veteran and president and chief operating officer of the Television Academy, died Wednesday of cancer. She was 56. Prior to joining the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, Hood was the executive director of the Institute for Communication Technology Management at USC. Hood spent much of her professional career at Fox, where she specialized in digital technology and rose to become president of Fox Mobile Entertainment. While there, she oversaw the creation of the mobile video version of the hit Fox series "24. " PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2014 | 2013 Hood was tapped to run the Television Academy, which oversees the annual Primetime Emmy Awards, less than a year ago. Her mandate was to bring the academy into the 21st century and make it more relevant to both the industry and the general public.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By David Pagel
Matthias Düwel packs loads of visual information into “Eden,” his L.A. solo debut at Martha Otero, which is itself packed with 24 oils, watercolors and drawings. Despite the sinuous ribbons of bright color writhing around in Düwel's modestly scaled paintings, none feels crowded. The same goes for his works on paper. In black-and-white or super-saturated color, they, too, leave viewers plenty of room to maneuver, sometimes swooping smoothly through open spaces and at others zipping every which way with stop-and-start suddenness, like a fly navigating a picnic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By David Pagel
Kathy Butterly does for sculpture what digital technology does for information: pack so much into such small spaces that it's impossible to reconcile an object's literal dimensions with the kicks it delivers. Size matters, but not like it used to. Think of what Butterly does as the microscopic sublime. Intimately and gently, she blows your mind, time after time, and never the same way.  At Shoshana Wayne Gallery, “Lots of Little Love Affairs” consists of 15 tabletop sculptures the New York artist has made over the last 18 months.
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