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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Lucy Hood, a well-regarded entertainment industry veteran and president and chief operating officer of the Television Academy, died Wednesday of cancer. She was 56. Prior to joining the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, Hood was the executive director of the Institute for Communication Technology Management at USC. Hood spent much of her professional career at Fox, where she specialized in digital technology and rose to become president of Fox Mobile Entertainment. While there, she oversaw the creation of the mobile video version of the hit Fox series "24. " PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2014 | 2013 Hood was tapped to run the Television Academy, which oversees the annual Primetime Emmy Awards, less than a year ago. Her mandate was to bring the academy into the 21st century and make it more relevant to both the industry and the general public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"Sunset Boulevard" is ready for its close-up. Billy Wilder's 1950 award-winning darkly satiric tale of Hollywood starring William Holden, Gloria Swanson, Erich Von Stroheim and Nancy Olson is making its Blu-ray debut Tuesday in a new digital restoration. This isn't the first digital restoration for "Sunset Boulevard," which earned 11 Oscar nominations and won three Academy Awards. "Sunset Boulevard" was restored a decade ago for its DVD release. "It was the first time that an entire film was scanned for restoration," noted Andrea Kalas, vice president of archives at Paramount Pictures.
OPINION
January 8, 2012
Every revolution has elements of tragedy as well as triumphs — even the bloodless revolutions in the way people earn a living. Economist Joseph Schumpeter called it "creative destruction," the entrepreneurial-driven process that "incessantly revolutionizes the economic structure from within, incessantly destroying the old one, incessantly creating a new one. " Such a process was set in motion by digital technology, which released information from...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By David Ng
Artist Kathy Butterly, whose abstract ceramic sculptures are noted for their colorful and playful aspects, has won the Smithsonian's Contemporary Arts Award for 2012. The biennial honor comes with a $25,000 prize and is intended to recognize artists younger than 50 who have produced a significant body of work. Butterly typically creates small-scale ceramic sculptures that are brightly colored and abstract in shape. Her work is often compared to the sculptures of Ron Nagle and Ken Price. The five-member jury that chose this year's winner wrote that Butterly's "small, nuanced, labor-intensive sculptures are richly communicative and wildly imaginative.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the week before the biggest TV-viewing day of the year, DirecTV launched an unprecedented electronic attack on an estimated 100,000 consumers who had been bootlegging its satellite TV service. The El Segundo-based company killed--via satellite--pirated pieces of hardware that had enabled viewers in the U.S. and abroad to see a broad range of programming, including premium channels and pay-per-view events that they had not paid for.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2004 | From Reuters
Britain took aim at the ubiquitous Hollywood blockbuster Monday by enlisting the latest digital technology to broaden the reach of independent films that often struggle to win wide distribution. The UK Film Council, a government-funded body, said it planned to equip 150 theaters across the country with digital projectors in exchange for a guarantee that the equipment will be used to show smaller-budget, foreign and classic films. Only nine have that capacity now.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
The nation's 1,600 TV stations each got a new channel assignment from federal regulators for the digital broadcasts some will begin airing by next Christmas. Broadcasters were studying the inches-thick chart to ensure that the licenses they're getting--which will replace the ones they use today by 2006--replicate the broadcast area their current licenses cover.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could lead to changes in the way Americans watch television, five major Hollywood studios have agreed on an anti-piracy technology designed to protect digital movies and other forms of video entertainment from theft. The move could speed the replacement of old analog TVs and cable set-top boxes and bring VCRs with new devices that can unscramble, record and store encrypted digital programming.
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