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BUSINESS
May 24, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
TiVo Inc., which created the market for digital video recorders, has asked a judge to shut down a competing service offered by EchoStar Communications Corp. because it's infringing a patent. A jury found in April that EchoStar was violating TiVo's patent for products that let a viewer record one TV program while watching another. U.S. District Judge David Folsom, who presided over the case in Texarkana, Texas, is to oversee a trial next month on whether the patent can be enforced.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
As expected, ratings for the second episode of the season for Fox's "The Following" were significantly lower in its move to its regular time slot, while most broadcast shows rose week-to-week and CBS' lineup surged to win Monday night. The second-season premiere of the Kevin Bacon crime drama last Sunday benefited from a huge lead-in: the NFC championship game. The NFL-boosted premiere scored a 4.4 rating in the advertiser-coveted age group. Monday's telecast at 9 p.m., after a "Following" rerun, drew 6 million viewers and a rating of 2.0 in the key 18-49 demographic.  Still, the network is expecting a substantial lift from viewers catching up via digital video recorders, video-on-demand and online streaming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2006 | Frank Ahrens, Washington Post
Prime-time television and its mighty 30-second commercial were supposed to be in trouble when a cutting-edge technology arrived on the scene several years ago, giving viewers a tool to zip past the traditional on-screen ads. Digital video recorders were like VCRs with super powers: able to pause live television, effortlessly record a season's worth of shows and even pick programs they think you will like.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Fox Broadcasting struck out again in its efforts to secure a preliminary injunction to stop satellite broadcaster Dish Network from offering its commercial-skipping feature known as the AutoHop. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed the decision by U.S. District Court Judge Dolly Gee for the Central District of California last November to reject Fox's preliminary injunction request. PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings Fox and other broadcasters have charged that Dish's AutoHop violates their copyright.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
One of the most popular new shows of the fall television season is NBC's "Revolution," a drama about post-apocalyptic America. But the real revolution is how people are watching it. About 9.2 million viewers tuned in to a recent episode, a so-so performance. But that number jumped by nearly 5 million when the Nielsen ratings service added in the people who recorded the show and watched it later or saw it through video on demand or online. Full coverage: Television reviews "Revolution" isn't the only show whose popularity can no longer be measured solely by traditional TV ratings.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2010 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
TiVo Inc. has struck a deal with Cox Communications to integrate the cable company's video-on-demand service into TiVo's digital video recorders. For consumers, the deal lets viewers take advantage of both TiVo and Cox on-demand services without having to juggle two devices. Before this deal, most consumers needed a cable set-top box to get on-demand programs and a TiVo for any number of Internet services such as streaming movies from Netflix Inc., Rhapsody Inc.'s music streaming and Amazon.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Cisco Systems Inc. of San Jose agreed to buy Kiss Technology for $61 million, setting up a battle with TiVo Inc. in the market for digital video recorders. Kiss, based in Denmark, sells digital video disc players and recorders and digital TVs.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Verizon Communications Inc. said it was working with Gemstar-TV Guide International Inc. on a way to schedule programs for recording by using the Web. Customers of Verizon's TV service, called FiOS, will be able to remotely set their digital video recorders using TV Guide listings, Hollywood-based Gemstar said. New York-based Verizon signed a patent agreement with Gemstar to use programming guides and related technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Meg James and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Not so long ago, the broadcast networks trumpeted their 10 p.m. shows as "appointment viewing," an hour so named for its slate of sophisticated and stylish dramas that commanded a rapt audience who watched in real time. Today, audiences are still watching at 10 p.m., but often not what the networks programmed for that time slot. Instead, people are increasingly playing back recorded shows from their digital video recorders. "Essentially the DVR has been like adding a whole new competitor to the time period," said David Poltrack, CBS' chief research officer.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Dish Network Corp. said first-quarter earnings climbed to 70 cents a share, topping the 56-cent average of estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Sales advanced 2.1% to $2.91 billion, in line with estimates. Average monthly bills rose 3.1% as Chief Executive Charlie Ergen charged more for programming and equipment such as digital video recorders. That helped Dish make up for subscriber losses, which reached 94,000 last quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2013 | By Meg James
Nearly two years after being canceled by the ABC network, soap operas "All My Children" and "One Life to Live" have been brought back to life on the Web. The two daytime dramas made their online debut Monday on the video site Hulu and Apple's iTunes store. In a sign of the shows' persistent appeal among fans, the soaps quickly bubbled up in the rankings of most popular TV shows offered by the two services. ABC canceled the programs in 2011 because they were becoming too expensive to produce, particularly as the median age of the audience marched past the 55-year mark, and advertisers became less interested in the format.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before figuring out whether I need a fashion makeover. The Skinny: I'm bummed HBO canceled "Enlightened" after two seasons. I really was starting to get into the show but I also understand the decision given how small the audience was. Even though HBO says they don't care about ratings, it's not in the charity business either. Wednesday's headlines include how the hit movie "The Call" ended up being shot in Los Angeles instead of Canada and why the broadcast networks are struggling to develop new reality hits.  Daily Dose: New CNN chief Jeff Zucker recently dubbed Jake Tapper the new face of CNN. Unfortunately for CNN, the face didn't give the network a ratings lift.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before prepping my bid for the Batmobile. The Skinny: I saw documentary "Central Park Five" over the weekend and strongly recommend it, especially to anyone who was living in New York City at the time of the Central Park rape. It's a great look at the failures of law enforcement, the justice system and the media. Monday's headlines include the weekend box-office recap, News Corp.'s new look and how sports rights are driving up cable bills. Daily Dose: NBC is bringing back Howard Stern as a judge on "America's Got Talent" next summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Never mind those declines in viewers and key demographics this season, broadcast television is entering a "new golden era," according to David Poltrack, chief research officer of CBS Corp. Poltrack, who has been crunching numbers for CBS for decades, said new platforms such as digital streaming and video on demand are allowing the networks to increase their reach beyond the traditional television screen. The trick is getting accurate ratings for non-traditional viewers. "The reason that younger adults view less TV than older adults is because they spend less time in the home and Nielsen measures viewing in the home," Poltrack said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Integrating products into plots of television shows is nothing new, but some series are taking it to levels that aren't always pretty and could alienate viewers. That was the case with last week's "New Girl" on Fox. In the episode, Jess (Zooey Deschanel) agrees to fill in for her model friend Cece (Hannah Simone), who is too hung over to properly ogle a new Ford. Jess, who is more of an earthy girl, gets made up and puts on some sky-high heels to prance around in.  She struggles with that, of course, and hilarity is supposed to ensue.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
One of the most popular new shows of the fall television season is NBC's "Revolution," a drama about post-apocalyptic America. But the real revolution is how people are watching it. About 9.2 million viewers tuned in to a recent episode, a so-so performance. But that number jumped by nearly 5 million when the Nielsen ratings service added in the people who recorded the show and watched it later or saw it through video on demand or online. Full coverage: Television reviews "Revolution" isn't the only show whose popularity can no longer be measured solely by traditional TV ratings.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The government will investigate a stealthy form of advertising in which products are featured on television shows as props and at times even woven into story lines. The Federal Communications Commission said it would consider rules to make it clear to viewers when brand-name products appear in shows in exchange for money. Spending on so-called "embedded advertising" has grown as advertisers look for new ways to reach viewers who flip channels during commercials or use digital video recorders such as TiVo to fast-forward past them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Integrating products into plots of television shows is nothing new, but some series are taking it to levels that aren't always pretty and could alienate viewers. That was the case with last week's "New Girl" on Fox. In the episode, Jess (Zooey Deschanel) agrees to fill in for her model friend Cece (Hannah Simone), who is too hung over to properly ogle a new Ford. Jess, who is more of an earthy girl, gets made up and puts on some sky-high heels to prance around in.  She struggles with that, of course, and hilarity is supposed to ensue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Wall Street is not thrilled with the new fall television season. On Thursday, two prominent media analysts issued reports expressing concern about the new season. So far, few new shows have taken off and ratings have tumbled at ABC, CBS and Fox in the adults 18-49 demographic that advertisers covet. Both CBS and Fox are off by more than 20% while ABC is down 13%. NBC, which has struggled for years, is the only network to improve in that key demographic, thanks to its move of "The Voice" to the fall, the early success of the drama "Revolution" and new comedies "Go On" and "The New Normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before finding out why I didn't get asked to host the Oscars. The Skinny: I went to the launch party for Time Warner Cable's new Los Angeles sports channels Monday night. Appropriately enough, the song I heard while walking down the red carpet into the event was Aloe Blacc's "I Need a Dollar. " Actually, the subscription fee is almost $4. Tuesday's headlines include reaction to the choice of Seth MacFarlane to host the Oscars and Tyler Perry and Oprah Winfrey's new partnership.
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