Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDigital Videodiscs
IN THE NEWS

Digital Videodiscs

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matsushita, MCA to Form Videodisc Unit: Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. and MCA Inc. will form a Los Angeles company to produce films for videodisc systems, according to the Japanese newspaper Nihon Keisai Shimbun. The company, Digital Video Compression Corp., will be owned by Matsushita and staffed by employees from Matsushita and MCA, the newspaper said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Netflix Inc., the mail-order movie-rental company, said it would start offering high-definition DVDs exclusively in Sony Corp.'s Blu-ray format. Netflix would phase out Toshiba Corp.'s HD-DVD format by the end of the year after a decision by four Hollywood movie studios to opt for the Blu-ray format over Toshiba's for high-definition films and videos, the Los Gatos, Calif.-based company said. Best Buy Co. also plans to recommend Blu-ray technology.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 9, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co., the second-largest U.S. media company, adopted Sony Corp.'s Blu-ray format for digital videodiscs, supporting its new standard for the home movie market. Disney's Buena Vista Home Entertainment will start releasing movies in the format when Blu-ray DVD players are available in North America and Japan, the Burbank-based company said. Disney said it might still release movies in the competing format by Toshiba Corp. Toshiba's HD DVD format has been backed by Time Warner Inc.'
BUSINESS
January 24, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Hewlett-Packard Co. plans to announce today that it has signed an agreement with Sony Pictures Home Entertainment to create made-to-order DVDs of some of the studio's movies and TV shows. The agreement, whose terms were not disclosed, boosts Palo Alto-based HP's ambition to play the middleman in the future of how entertainment is distributed.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2003 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Are VHS tapes about to join vinyl albums in the dustbin? In the latest sign of the rise of digital media, weekly DVD rentals exceeded videocassettes last week for the first time, according to the Video Software Dealers Assn. The trade organization said an estimated 28.2 million digital videodiscs were rented for the week ended June 15, outpacing 27.3 million VHS rentals.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dramatizing a rapid shift in consumer electronics, Blockbuster Inc. announced Monday that its stores will dump one-fourth of their VHS tapes to make room for more profitable digital videodiscs. Blockbuster will take a $450-million charge against earnings to cover the inventory overhaul. The announcement was the latest in a series of moves and countermoves by Hollywood studios, which rely heavily on video rental revenue, and Blockbuster, the dominant source of those rentals.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1999 | From Reuters
A DVD industry group said Tuesday it has filed suit against dozens of Web site operators for allegedly posting a DVD copying program that the group says is illegal and could destroy the fast-growing new format. At the heart of the complaint is a program written by a Norwegian programmer that foils the encryption that prevents DVDs, or digital videodiscs, from being copied.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2000 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood's hopes that the DVD format would prove harder to pirate than videos and CDs are being badly dashed in China and other parts of Asia, where DVD piracy has emerged on a major scale. China's experience shows that DVD piracy, once seen in the West as largely a hypothetical threat, is both possible and profitable.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2007 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
DVDs featuring new movies are coming out faster than ever. The average time between the premiere of a movie at the multiplex and its appearance on DVD shrank an additional 10 days last year, further unnerving theater owners who believe that the tightening window threatens their business. The revelation from a new study is likely to further shake exhibitors when it is formally unveiled this week by the National Assn. of Theatre Owners at the industry's annual ShoWest convention in Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | SAM KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California has emerged as an international hub of a multibillion-dollar business that didn't even exist five years ago: the production of digital videodiscs, or DVDs. With a handful of major manufacturers clustered around Hollywood studios, the region has more production capacity than anywhere in the United States, if not the world. One in five of the 730 million DVDs sold last year were made in California, according to London consulting firm Understanding & Solutions.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
American video stores have new-release sections. Chinese video stores have not-yet-released sections. On a recent weeknight here, four people entered a neighborhood shop, where a clerk escorted them through a back door to a closet-sized room. Floor-to-ceiling shelves brimmed with some of the latest Hollywood movies, including "Ratatouille," which had just reached Chinese theaters a week earlier and wasn't due out on DVD until January.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- It's not your typical "Sesame Street" episode. There are no lessons in letters or numbers, but there are plenty of hugs and lots of talk about feelings. Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization that produces the hit kids' show, is working on a DVD that will be distributed to military families. It's designed to help injured veterans talk about their disabilities with their children. Gary E.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
A long-anticipated technology that will let consumers burn downloaded movies to DVDs is expected to be announced today, representing a potential milestone in the development of online movie services. Sonic Solutions Inc. of Novato, Calif., said it had won approval for its technology, which makes it possible for people to record homemade DVDs containing the same copy protection found on professionally made DVDs. The approval came after protracted negotiations with the DVD Copy Control Assn.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The organization that licenses DVD security software cleared the way Thursday for movies bought over the Internet to be burned onto a DVD that can play on any machine -- a move that could dramatically change the way movies are sold. Industry executives hailed the decision by the DVD Copy Control Assn. to license software designed to allow content to be burned to one disc but not copied to others. "This is great news," said Curt Marvis, chief executive of movie download service CinemaNow.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
On April 9, the Los Angeles Philharmonic announced the appointment of Gustavo Dudamel as the orchestra's next music director, beginning in 2009. The news was a bombshell, and the global media went into astonishing high gear. India called. Al Jazeera requested an interview. "60 Minutes" insisted upon its 20 minutes with the fastest-rising star in classical music. But after a Philharmonic news conference, the fastest-rising star in classical music was nowhere to be found.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Much-anticipated contract negotiations between Hollywood's writers and their employers got off to a predictably contentious start Monday, with each side publicly lambasting the other's proposals. Writers Guild of America negotiators are seeking to double the rate of compensation writers receive from DVD sales, want union pay and benefits for writers working in reality television and on basic cable shows and are proposing a much higher rate of pay when shows are downloaded from the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The highlight of the two-disc set of "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" (Paramount, $35) is the clever, tongue-in-cheek audio track between director Brad Silberling and the "real" Mr. Snicket -- author Daniel Handler. The other extras -- covering every aspect of the production -- are entertaining and informative.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | James Bates
The trade association representing the booming DVD business is revamping and has been renamed the Digital Entertainment Group. The Los Angeles-based organization, formerly called the DVD Entertainment Group, named Amy Jo Donner its full-time executive director. Buena Vista Home Entertainment President Bob Chapek will serve as president, with Sony Electronics executive Joe Stinziano serving as vice president. Philips executive Emiel N.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The European Commission said Tuesday that it had asked several Hollywood studios to explain why they chose either the Blue-ray disc or HD DVD format for movie discs to see whether they were breaking European Union rules that bar companies from shutting out rivals. The Sony Corp.-backed Blu-ray format has won strong support from Hollywood. Walt Disney Co., News Corp.'
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
A high-spirited adaptation of a classic in children's literature and a biography of one of the genre's most popular authors are set for release today on DVD. "Bridge to Terabithia" (Disney, $30), based on Katherine Paterson's award-winning novel, revolves around an artistic boy (Josh Hutcherson) who is bullied at school but becomes friends with his bright, imaginative new neighbor and classmate (Annasophia Robb).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|