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Digital Videodiscs

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BUSINESS
April 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matsushita, MCA to Form Videodisc Unit: Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. and MCA Inc. will form a Los Angeles company to produce films for videodisc systems, according to the Japanese newspaper Nihon Keisai Shimbun. The company, Digital Video Compression Corp., will be owned by Matsushita and staffed by employees from Matsushita and MCA, the newspaper said.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 2009 | Claudia Eller and Ben Fritz
Sony Pictures desperately wanted to release the DVD of the Michael Jackson concert movie "This Is It" for the holiday shopping season but backed down after movie theater owners complained that it would be too soon after the film's theatrical premiere. That thwarted the latest attempt by a Hollywood studio to shorten the "window" between when movies appear in theaters and when they come out on DVD as the industry grapples with a downturn in DVD sales, which have traditionally propped up the movie business.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Walt Disney Co., the second-largest U.S. media company, adopted Sony Corp.'s Blu-ray format for digital videodiscs, supporting its new standard for the home movie market. Disney's Buena Vista Home Entertainment will start releasing movies in the format when Blu-ray DVD players are available in North America and Japan, the Burbank-based company said. Disney said it might still release movies in the competing format by Toshiba Corp. Toshiba's HD DVD format has been backed by Time Warner Inc.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
As Yogi Berra would say: Yikes, it's déjà vu all over again. In recent days, my newspaper has been chock-full of stories about the latest round of legal battles between the Hollywood studios and Redbox, the upstart $1-per-night DVD rental kiosk company. My colleague Ben Fritz has done a wonderful job of chronicling all the fussing and fighting, having reported on how three of Hollywood's biggest studios -- 20th Century Fox, Warner Bros. and Universal -- are refusing to provide DVDs to Redbox until at least 28 days after they go on sale.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2003 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Are VHS tapes about to join vinyl albums in the dustbin? In the latest sign of the rise of digital media, weekly DVD rentals exceeded videocassettes last week for the first time, according to the Video Software Dealers Assn. The trade organization said an estimated 28.2 million digital videodiscs were rented for the week ended June 15, outpacing 27.3 million VHS rentals.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dramatizing a rapid shift in consumer electronics, Blockbuster Inc. announced Monday that its stores will dump one-fourth of their VHS tapes to make room for more profitable digital videodiscs. Blockbuster will take a $450-million charge against earnings to cover the inventory overhaul. The announcement was the latest in a series of moves and countermoves by Hollywood studios, which rely heavily on video rental revenue, and Blockbuster, the dominant source of those rentals.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1999 | From Reuters
A DVD industry group said Tuesday it has filed suit against dozens of Web site operators for allegedly posting a DVD copying program that the group says is illegal and could destroy the fast-growing new format. At the heart of the complaint is a program written by a Norwegian programmer that foils the encryption that prevents DVDs, or digital videodiscs, from being copied.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2000 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood's hopes that the DVD format would prove harder to pirate than videos and CDs are being badly dashed in China and other parts of Asia, where DVD piracy has emerged on a major scale. China's experience shows that DVD piracy, once seen in the West as largely a hypothetical threat, is both possible and profitable.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2007 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
DVDs featuring new movies are coming out faster than ever. The average time between the premiere of a movie at the multiplex and its appearance on DVD shrank an additional 10 days last year, further unnerving theater owners who believe that the tightening window threatens their business. The revelation from a new study is likely to further shake exhibitors when it is formally unveiled this week by the National Assn. of Theatre Owners at the industry's annual ShoWest convention in Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | SAM KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California has emerged as an international hub of a multibillion-dollar business that didn't even exist five years ago: the production of digital videodiscs, or DVDs. With a handful of major manufacturers clustered around Hollywood studios, the region has more production capacity than anywhere in the United States, if not the world. One in five of the 730 million DVDs sold last year were made in California, according to London consulting firm Understanding & Solutions.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2009 | Ben Fritz and Dawn C. Chmielewski
Recession-fueled penny-pinching is driving consumers to rent more movies and buy fewer. New data released Thursday by the Digital Entertainment Group, an industry trade organization, showed that movie rental revenue rose 8% in the first half of the year -- a remarkable uptick for a business that many in Hollywood had thought peaked. At the same time, sales of DVDs have taken a shellacking, falling 13.5% for the period.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Netflix Inc., the mail-order movie-rental company, said it would start offering high-definition DVDs exclusively in Sony Corp.'s Blu-ray format. Netflix would phase out Toshiba Corp.'s HD-DVD format by the end of the year after a decision by four Hollywood movie studios to opt for the Blu-ray format over Toshiba's for high-definition films and videos, the Los Gatos, Calif.-based company said. Best Buy Co. also plans to recommend Blu-ray technology.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Hewlett-Packard Co. plans to announce today that it has signed an agreement with Sony Pictures Home Entertainment to create made-to-order DVDs of some of the studio's movies and TV shows. The agreement, whose terms were not disclosed, boosts Palo Alto-based HP's ambition to play the middleman in the future of how entertainment is distributed.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2007 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
Larry Kay has won awards and endorsements for his DVD that aims to teach preschoolers values through pet care. His investors include a co-founder of the successful stamps.com and the head of the Red Mango USA yogurt chain. His resume includes stints at children's entertainment giants Walt Disney Co., Activision Inc. and MGM. So why can't Kay, head of Animal Wow Entertainment Inc. in Sherman Oaks, sell enough of his whimsical "Dogs Wow Dogs" DVDs and music CDs to get out of the red?
BUSINESS
November 12, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
American video stores have new-release sections. Chinese video stores have not-yet-released sections. On a recent weeknight here, four people entered a neighborhood shop, where a clerk escorted them through a back door to a closet-sized room. Floor-to-ceiling shelves brimmed with some of the latest Hollywood movies, including "Ratatouille," which had just reached Chinese theaters a week earlier and wasn't due out on DVD until January.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- It's not your typical "Sesame Street" episode. There are no lessons in letters or numbers, but there are plenty of hugs and lots of talk about feelings. Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization that produces the hit kids' show, is working on a DVD that will be distributed to military families. It's designed to help injured veterans talk about their disabilities with their children. Gary E.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The highlight of the two-disc set of "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" (Paramount, $35) is the clever, tongue-in-cheek audio track between director Brad Silberling and the "real" Mr. Snicket -- author Daniel Handler. The other extras -- covering every aspect of the production -- are entertaining and informative.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | James Bates
The trade association representing the booming DVD business is revamping and has been renamed the Digital Entertainment Group. The Los Angeles-based organization, formerly called the DVD Entertainment Group, named Amy Jo Donner its full-time executive director. Buena Vista Home Entertainment President Bob Chapek will serve as president, with Sony Electronics executive Joe Stinziano serving as vice president. Philips executive Emiel N.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
A long-anticipated technology that will let consumers burn downloaded movies to DVDs is expected to be announced today, representing a potential milestone in the development of online movie services. Sonic Solutions Inc. of Novato, Calif., said it had won approval for its technology, which makes it possible for people to record homemade DVDs containing the same copy protection found on professionally made DVDs. The approval came after protracted negotiations with the DVD Copy Control Assn.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The organization that licenses DVD security software cleared the way Thursday for movies bought over the Internet to be burned onto a DVD that can play on any machine -- a move that could dramatically change the way movies are sold. Industry executives hailed the decision by the DVD Copy Control Assn. to license software designed to allow content to be burned to one disc but not copied to others. "This is great news," said Curt Marvis, chief executive of movie download service CinemaNow.
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