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Dignified

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OPINION
July 2, 2006
Re "Homeless in life, nameless in death," June 25 I thought a pauper's grave was a thing of the past until I read about the destinies of L.A.'s homeless people who die on our streets. What's most disturbing is that these people with names but no homes are buried anonymously, all in one plot. This should remind us that the quest to solve homelessness is a communitywide effort, not just the government's responsibility. Maybe if we start by honoring the homeless who have died on our streets with dignified memorial services, we might be more motivated to honor the living with dignified housing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By David Macaray
So Ellen DeGeneres is set to host the 86th Academy Awards next week. Nothing against her or, for that matter, Billy Crystal (who has hosted nine telecasts), Whoopi Goldberg (who has hosted four) or Steve Martin (who has done three), but when was it decided that this most glamorous awards show needed to be funny to sustain an audience? After all, it's not as if comedy so dominates the proceedings that only a professional comedian is worthy of hosting it. In fact, the opposite is true.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1991
I hope that those who love to throw around the term body bags have noticed that our fallen servicemen have come home in dignified, flag-draped coffins, accompanied by honor guards and given a hero's funeral. They will always be remembered for their heroism. JEANNE JENNINGS Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2012 | Sandy Banks
Margit Loudermilk of North Hollywood was walking visitors from Germany through Forest Lawn on Saturday, admiring the view from the Hollywood Hills, when she stopped for water at the cemetery's Liberty Hall. "I knew something big was going on," she said, what with the news vans parked outside, black-clad crowd gathered in the rotunda and guards ringing the hall. She approached a middle-aged woman near the water cooler and asked what was going on. PHOTOS: Rodney King memorial It's a funeral, the woman said.
OPINION
May 3, 1998
The story of James Guthrie Jr. who, in desperation, as an act of mercy, bludgeoned his beloved mother to death to end her suffering is most appalling (April 24). However, had they lived in Oregon, which now has a law permitting physician aid in dying, such a brutal end to his mother's life would not have happened. It could have been peaceful, dignified and humane--and the son would not have to carry the burden of guilt for the rest of his days. Why doesn't California have such a law?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1997
Re the latest example of political correctness run amok, "L.A. School Board Bans Mascots With Indian References," Sept. 9: I always thought schools chose mascots that contributed to a proud, dignified identity. As such, I would happily lend my name to one of the schools in search of a new mascot. They can call themselves "the Bobs." ROBERT J. FRIAS Orcutt University High School was originally named Warren G. Harding, and we know what happened there. As a graduate Warrior, class of Winter '44, I say: Nuts.
SPORTS
April 12, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
The dignified champion had just hit what he thought was a dignified tee shot. But the fairway was longer than last year. And he was older than last year. Looking at the gaping distance required for his second effort on the Masters' renovated 14th hole Thursday, Arnold Palmer gasped, then trudged to the gallery in search of a shoulder. "Why don't we just retire right now?" he said to friend Russ Meyer. "It will get better," Meyer said. "I hope so," Palmer said. They both looked away, because they both knew it wouldn't.
BOOKS
April 11, 1993
Re the recent review of "Power, Privilege and the Post: The Katharine Graham Story" (March 28): I was astonished that Patt Morrison should have failed to realize what Philip Graham's daughter Lally notes in her March 5th article in the Washington Post: "the book consists of a hideous caricature of my father and a slanderous depiction of my entire family." Many of those whose biographies are written today are exposed to shameful and brutal treatment by the authors. Too many writers are willing to cater to what has become an overwhelming greed for sensational and scandalous presentations of what would normally be seen as dignified and useful lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1989
I just returned from a brief business trip to Washington, D.C., and took the opportunity to "drop in" on several congressmen. I think your readers would be pleased to know that, at least in one instance, it appears the taxpayers are finally getting their money's worth. This particular congressman didn't have the luxurious, expensive furnishings like many others. His staff was hard at work, not talking to potential Friday night dates on the telephone, as I saw in another office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was lethal conversation, laced with talk of painkillers and suffocation by plastic bag. But for Derek Humphry, co-founder of the Hemlock Society and best-selling author of a manual on suicide, telling others how to die is a way of life. On Saturday, the 61-year-old Eugene, Ore., author described how, in 1975, he assisted in the suicide of his first wife, Jean, who was suffering from terminal cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Serial wife-killer Jerry Stanley wants to die. Imprisoned on death row for the past 28 years, Stanley insists he deserves execution for the cold-blooded killing of his fourth wife in 1980 and for shooting to death his second wife five years earlier in front of their two children. Despairing of the isolation and monotony of San Quentin's rooftop fortress for the purportedly doomed, Stanley earlier this year stepped up his campaign for a date with the executioner by offering to solve the cold case of his third wife's disappearance 31 years ago — by disclosing where he buried her body.
OPINION
September 23, 2011 | By Max Boot
Our embattled man in Damascus, Ambassador Robert Ford, is threatened not only by the Syrian regime but by Republican senators who are dragging their feet on confirming his appointment. Their opposition, which is founded on the premise that we should not dignify Bashar Assad's regime with an ambassador, is understandable but misguided. Ford has been a profile in courage in opposing Assad. This should be no surprise to anyone who has followed the low-key Arabist's career. A lifelong Foreign Service officer and fluent Arabic speaker, he performed admirably in Iraq in a variety of roles under trying conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2010 | Sandy Banks
The mourners were outnumbered by news crews and clerics at this week's burial service at the Los Angeles County Crematory. I'm not sure what group to count myself in. I took notes, and I prayed. And I mourned for those who had died alone, as I contemplated the freshly dug mass grave that had become their final home. It held the remains of 1,689 people who died in Los Angeles County three years ago and were cremated by the county after no one showed up to claim their bodies. Three years later, their ashes were still unclaimed.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2008 | JAMES RAINEY
At least one figure on the stage for Thursday night's vice presidential debate reached a high standard for reason, fairness and class. Gwen Ifill of PBS demonstrated abundant dignity as referee of the much-anticipated debate between Sarah Palin and Joe Biden. The veteran newswoman lived up, in every sense, to her title: moderator. She directed the candidates to important topics, pushed to keep them on subject and betrayed no favoritism.
OPINION
October 24, 2007
Re "State reaches into grave for funds," column, Oct. 21 Steve Lopez, in this instance, failed to look at the big picture. Lopez states that the value of the Medi-Cal beneficiary's house is excluded in determining his eligibility for assistance. Let us assume that Leonard Ratzman receives $100,000 in benefits from Medi-Cal. At the time of his death, let's say his house is worth $300,000. Medi-Cal can get repaid and the daughter can get the balance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2007 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
There's no "Cowabunga" this time around. That Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles rallying cry and the rapid-fire one-liners have fallen by the wayside as the still-lean, still-green, nunchaku-wielding, pizza-eating terrapins return Friday for their fourth film installment. "We just wanted to present them in a more dignified light and make the movie an homage to the comics that spawned the Turtles," says "TMNT" director Kevin Munroe.
NEWS
January 17, 1996 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Doe, an anonymous AIDS patient who has joined with Jack Kevorkian to challenge California's ban on assisted suicide, wants help in dying "when the time comes." But he doesn't want help from Kevorkian. In his first interview since he agreed to represent the interests of Californians "who seek a peaceful, dignified, physician-assisted death," the 36-year-old film editor says Kevorkian's style is not for him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2000
Much to the surprise of Democrats, the Republicans were very gracious in accepting victory in this presidential election (Dec. 14). George W. Bush was almost as dignified in his acceptance speech as Al Gore was in his concession speech. All Americans should be proud of Gore and Bush. They both rose to the occasion and convincingly asked Americans to come together, and we will. But the Democratic victory is yet to come. We need to secure for all Americans a more accurate and fair election process.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2006 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
HOLLYWOOD is always being accused of having a pernicious influence on our personal values, of preferring to promote sex, violence, moral equivalency and other horrible perversities. Yet two of the fall's best films -- "Flags of Our Fathers" and "The Queen" -- honor an especially timely traditional value: people who choose reticence over shameless exhibitionism. The heroes of "Flags of Our Fathers" are the five Marines and a Navy corpsman who raised the Stars and Stripes atop Mt.
OPINION
July 2, 2006
Re "Homeless in life, nameless in death," June 25 I thought a pauper's grave was a thing of the past until I read about the destinies of L.A.'s homeless people who die on our streets. What's most disturbing is that these people with names but no homes are buried anonymously, all in one plot. This should remind us that the quest to solve homelessness is a communitywide effort, not just the government's responsibility. Maybe if we start by honoring the homeless who have died on our streets with dignified memorial services, we might be more motivated to honor the living with dignified housing.
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