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Dilma Rousseff

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OPINION
November 5, 2010 | By Peter Hakim
Unlike Americans, Brazilians believe their country is headed in the right direction ? and voted to keep it on course. That was the central message of Dilma Rousseff's triumph in Sunday's election in Brazil. Dilma, as she is universally called, was the chief of staff and handpicked successor of current Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who leaves office after two terms with an 80% approval rating. He will be a hard act to follow, even for Dilma, who played a crucial part in his accomplishments.
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WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
MESQUITA, Brazil - As Dilma Rousseff neared the end of her successful 2010 campaign to become Brazil's president, Jeferson Monteiro set up a parody Twitter account and began having fun at her expense. When Rousseff took office and abandoned her own account on the microblogging service, Monteiro began sending tweets as the president, adopting the manic and self-obsessed vernacular common to the teenagers dominating the social media networks. He gently lampooned a president often seen as serious and tough.
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WORLD
October 4, 2010 | By Marcelo Soares and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A former leftist rebel who was the handpicked candidate of Brazil's popular President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva came in first Sunday in a three-way race to succeed him, but could not ride the incumbent's coattails to a first-round victory. Dilma Rousseff went into Sunday's balloting with a commanding lead over Social Democrat Jose Serra, but nearly complete returns show she came up short of the majority she needed to win outright and avoid a runoff. With more than 98% of the vote counted, Rousseff had about 47%, Serra 33% and former Environment Minister Marina Silva 20%. A total of nine candidates ran, and about 135 million people across the vast country were eligible to vote.
WORLD
September 17, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Vincent Bevins
WASHINGTON - In the latest fallout from the Edward Snowden affair, the president of Brazil canceled a state visit to Washington out of anger that the National Security Agency had spied on her and other Brazilian officials, deepening a rift with the Obama administration. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff on Tuesday called off the high-profile visit that both governments had planned for Oct. 23. A White House spokesman sought to downplay the diplomatic snub by a key ally and trading partner, and described the decision to indefinitely postpone the visit as mutual.
WORLD
October 16, 2011 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
When Dilma Rousseff took over as president of Brazil in January, she had rather big shoes to fill. Her predecessor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, finished his two terms as one of the most popular leaders in the world, with his country riding a wave of economic progress and optimism. Rousseff, known as Dilma in Brazil, had little executive experience or public profile until Lula handpicked her to carry the torch for his center-left Workers' Party. The former guerrilla waged a successful campaign and gained a reputation as a tough and pragmatic technocrat, but many were unsure whether she'd have the skill, or luck, needed to follow in Lula's seemingly blessed footsteps.
WORLD
March 28, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
BRASILIA, Brazil - Francisco Everardo Oliveira Silva never expected to actually be elected to Brazil's Congress. When he ran for a seat in 2010, he used his clown name, Tiririca, and wore a tiny orange hat and a blond wig in his campaign TV spots. Between singing and dancing, he made some very odd campaign promises. "What does a federal deputy do? I don't really know. But vote for me, and I'll tell you!" "I promise to help those in need," he said, in a nod to political corruption.
WORLD
October 2, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
When former shoeshine boy Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva was elected Brazil's president eight years ago, some feared he would lead the country to ruin. Now, having steered a booming economy through the global crisis and outdueled the U.S. to host the 2016 Olympic Games, the onetime union organizer is preparing to leave office praised by world leaders as disparate as President Obama and Venezuela's Hugo Chavez. Brazilians will vote Sunday for a successor to Lula, who will leave a country much more prosperous and more equal than the one he took over in January 2003.
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
MESQUITA, Brazil - As Dilma Rousseff neared the end of her successful 2010 campaign to become Brazil's president, Jeferson Monteiro set up a parody Twitter account and began having fun at her expense. When Rousseff took office and abandoned her own account on the microblogging service, Monteiro began sending tweets as the president, adopting the manic and self-obsessed vernacular common to the teenagers dominating the social media networks. He gently lampooned a president often seen as serious and tough.
WORLD
March 3, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When left-leaning President Joao Goulart was deposed by the Brazilian military in 1964, the nation's major news media, controlled by a few wealthy families, celebrated. But during the 21-year dictatorship that followed, the government censored the newspapers and television stations the families operated. Things are different now. Since 2003, Brazil has been run by the popular left-of-center Workers' Party, known as PT, which has left the news media alone. But the publications and TV stations, still controlled by the same families, have been critical of the party, despite a public approval rating for President Dilma Rousseff as high as 78%. Not a single major news outlet supports her, with some newspapers and magazines particularly harsh in their criticism.
WORLD
July 8, 2011 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
Two of President Dilma Rousseff's ministers have resigned recently amid accusations of corruption, complicating her efforts to run Latin America's largest country after taking over from Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in January. Transport Minister Alfredo Nascimento resigned late Wednesday after accusations that officers in his ministry had acted inappropriately, including accepting bribes in awarding government contracts. Last month, Antonio Palocci, Rousseff's chief of staff and most senior minister, resigned after news reports said his personal wealth had risen sharply during his time as a congressman and did not seem to match his apparent sources of income.
WORLD
June 21, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - A day after 1 million Brazilians took to the streets in protests that left two dead, President Dilma Rousseff again sought to reach out to demonstrators, praising the unexpected movement and presenting a program that would respond to some of its diverse demands. Yet even as she delivered her televised speech in Brasilia, the capital, smaller demonstrations continued throughout the country and protesters blocked access to the nation's largest airport. Friday was the ninth straight day of marches that have rocked the country as it hosts the FIFA Confederations Cup, an international soccer tournament seen as a test run for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics, both to be held in Brazil.
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - Shortly before Venezuela's presidential election, former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva recorded a video supporting Nicolas Maduro, saying he had "stood out brilliantly in the struggle" for a more democratic Latin America. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, who was endorsed by Lula in 2010, kept silent on the ultimately victorious candidacy of Maduro, the hand-chosen heir of the late leftist Venezuelan president, Hugo Chavez. The difference in demeanor between the two Brazilian presidents was not surprising to Rousseff watchers.
WORLD
March 28, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
BRASILIA, Brazil - Francisco Everardo Oliveira Silva never expected to actually be elected to Brazil's Congress. When he ran for a seat in 2010, he used his clown name, Tiririca, and wore a tiny orange hat and a blond wig in his campaign TV spots. Between singing and dancing, he made some very odd campaign promises. "What does a federal deputy do? I don't really know. But vote for me, and I'll tell you!" "I promise to help those in need," he said, in a nod to political corruption.
WORLD
March 3, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When left-leaning President Joao Goulart was deposed by the Brazilian military in 1964, the nation's major news media, controlled by a few wealthy families, celebrated. But during the 21-year dictatorship that followed, the government censored the newspapers and television stations the families operated. Things are different now. Since 2003, Brazil has been run by the popular left-of-center Workers' Party, known as PT, which has left the news media alone. But the publications and TV stations, still controlled by the same families, have been critical of the party, despite a public approval rating for President Dilma Rousseff as high as 78%. Not a single major news outlet supports her, with some newspapers and magazines particularly harsh in their criticism.
WORLD
October 29, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - Brazil's governing Workers' Party won control of South America's largest city as Fernando Haddad was elected mayor of Sao Paulo in Sunday's runoff municipal elections. The big election day prize was won after popular former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and President Dilma Rousseff threw their support behind Haddad, a former education minister. "I thank President [Lula] for the guidance and support. Without it, it wouldn't have been possible to achieve this victory," Haddad said in his victory speech.
OPINION
April 9, 2012 | By Peter Hakim
Brazil'srising stature and influence will be on display when President Dilma Rousseff arrives in Washington this week - as it was when President Obama visited Brazil one year ago, accompanied by his top economic advisors, including several Cabinet members, and about 50 chief executives from the largest U.S. companies. The conundrum that faces the two governments is how to turn what both agree is a critical relationship into a productive and cooperative one. Brazilians and Americans talk a great deal about the desirability of a "strategic" relationship between their countries, but neither does much to achieve it. The economic benefits should be obvious.
OPINION
April 13, 2011 | By Marc B. Haefele
Last month, one of Latin America's top journalism prizes went to a man whose only known investigative coup was a recent finding that capitalism may have destroyed life on Mars. Yes, none other than Hugo Chavez, president of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, waltzed off with the Rodolfo Walsh Prize, given by Argentina's National University de la Plata and named after one of the 20th century's genuine martyrs to the profession. It was hard not to suppose that the honor was promoted by Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, who has lately chosen to play Tonto to Chavez's neo-socialist Lone Ranger.
WORLD
June 21, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - A day after 1 million Brazilians took to the streets in protests that left two dead, President Dilma Rousseff again sought to reach out to demonstrators, praising the unexpected movement and presenting a program that would respond to some of its diverse demands. Yet even as she delivered her televised speech in Brasilia, the capital, smaller demonstrations continued throughout the country and protesters blocked access to the nation's largest airport. Friday was the ninth straight day of marches that have rocked the country as it hosts the FIFA Confederations Cup, an international soccer tournament seen as a test run for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics, both to be held in Brazil.
WORLD
April 7, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - If you plan to fly somewhere in Brazil on a busy weekend, you'd better be prepared to wait. At some airports, up to a third of the flights can be canceled or delayed. If you choose to drive, you'll sit in traffic. The 50-mile trip from Sao Paulo to nearby beaches for the Carnaval holiday this year took as long as five hours. If you're counting on the planned bullet train between Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, good luck with that. It won't be ready when Brazil hosts soccer's 2014 World Cup. In fact, the transportation minister said recently that it won't be operating until 2022, at the earliest.
WORLD
October 16, 2011 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
When Dilma Rousseff took over as president of Brazil in January, she had rather big shoes to fill. Her predecessor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, finished his two terms as one of the most popular leaders in the world, with his country riding a wave of economic progress and optimism. Rousseff, known as Dilma in Brazil, had little executive experience or public profile until Lula handpicked her to carry the torch for his center-left Workers' Party. The former guerrilla waged a successful campaign and gained a reputation as a tough and pragmatic technocrat, but many were unsure whether she'd have the skill, or luck, needed to follow in Lula's seemingly blessed footsteps.
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