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Dilma Rousseff

WORLD
July 8, 2011 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
Two of President Dilma Rousseff's ministers have resigned recently amid accusations of corruption, complicating her efforts to run Latin America's largest country after taking over from Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in January. Transport Minister Alfredo Nascimento resigned late Wednesday after accusations that officers in his ministry had acted inappropriately, including accepting bribes in awarding government contracts. Last month, Antonio Palocci, Rousseff's chief of staff and most senior minister, resigned after news reports said his personal wealth had risen sharply during his time as a congressman and did not seem to match his apparent sources of income.
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OPINION
April 13, 2011 | By Marc B. Haefele
Last month, one of Latin America's top journalism prizes went to a man whose only known investigative coup was a recent finding that capitalism may have destroyed life on Mars. Yes, none other than Hugo Chavez, president of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, waltzed off with the Rodolfo Walsh Prize, given by Argentina's National University de la Plata and named after one of the 20th century's genuine martyrs to the profession. It was hard not to suppose that the honor was promoted by Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, who has lately chosen to play Tonto to Chavez's neo-socialist Lone Ranger.
WORLD
January 14, 2011 | By Marcelo Soares and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Emergency crews were working feverishly to reach survivors of flash floods and mudslides in Brazil that have killed at least 470 people and left nearly 14,000 homeless after torrential summer rains, authorities said Thursday. Massive mudslides in the heavily damaged mountainous area north of the city of Rio de Janeiro could take until Saturday to clear, increasing fears of a rising death toll as rain remained in the forecast, authorities said. Many residents were without electricity.
WORLD
January 2, 2011 | By Marcelo Soares and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Accepting the green and yellow mantle of power from her immensely popular mentor, former Marxist guerrilla Dilma Rousseff was sworn in Saturday as Brazil's first female president and faced two immediate tasks: keeping the booming economy on track and fleshing out Brazil's developing role on the world stage. Rousseff succeeded Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who left Planalto presidential palace in Brasilia with an 87% approval rating, the highest in recent history for a departing leader of South America's largest and most populous country.
OPINION
November 5, 2010 | By Peter Hakim
Unlike Americans, Brazilians believe their country is headed in the right direction ? and voted to keep it on course. That was the central message of Dilma Rousseff's triumph in Sunday's election in Brazil. Dilma, as she is universally called, was the chief of staff and handpicked successor of current Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who leaves office after two terms with an 80% approval rating. He will be a hard act to follow, even for Dilma, who played a crucial part in his accomplishments.
WORLD
November 1, 2010 | By Marcelo Soares and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Dilma Rousseff, a former rebel and longtime bureaucrat who has never held elective political office, will become Brazil's first female president after her victory Sunday in a runoff election. With 99% of votes counted, Rousseff led Jose Serra of the Social Democratic Party by 55.6% to 44.4%, an insurmountable lead. Analysts agree that it wasn't Workers' Party candidate Rousseff's record, campaign proposals or oratory that provided her with the margin of victory, which was smaller than most voter preference polls had predicted.
WORLD
October 4, 2010 | By Marcelo Soares and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A former leftist rebel who was the handpicked candidate of Brazil's popular President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva came in first Sunday in a three-way race to succeed him, but could not ride the incumbent's coattails to a first-round victory. Dilma Rousseff went into Sunday's balloting with a commanding lead over Social Democrat Jose Serra, but nearly complete returns show she came up short of the majority she needed to win outright and avoid a runoff. With more than 98% of the vote counted, Rousseff had about 47%, Serra 33% and former Environment Minister Marina Silva 20%. A total of nine candidates ran, and about 135 million people across the vast country were eligible to vote.
WORLD
October 2, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
When former shoeshine boy Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva was elected Brazil's president eight years ago, some feared he would lead the country to ruin. Now, having steered a booming economy through the global crisis and outdueled the U.S. to host the 2016 Olympic Games, the onetime union organizer is preparing to leave office praised by world leaders as disparate as President Obama and Venezuela's Hugo Chavez. Brazilians will vote Sunday for a successor to Lula, who will leave a country much more prosperous and more equal than the one he took over in January 2003.
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