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Diminished Capacity

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NEWS
December 13, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to allow defendants to evade a charge of murder on grounds they were drunk or mentally impaired when the killing occurred. The court unanimously rejected what prosecutors called an attempt to resurrect the controversial "diminished capacity" defense. The legal defense had been abolished by the Legislature and the voters under Proposition 8, a 1982 anti-crime initiative.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 4, 2009
Re "The harsh realities of mental illness," Opinion, Dec. 29 Robert David Jaffee's Op-Ed article depicts a story of hope -- one that is especially encouraging because we often hear only of the tragic consequences that befall individuals with severe mental illness, their families and society at large. The failure to provide treatment to people suffering from mental illness is an often-overlooked cause of not only homelessness but of victimization, incarceration and death. For every 20 public psychiatric beds that existed in the U.S. in 1955, only one such bed existed in 2005.
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NEWS
November 6, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court was asked by defense attorneys Tuesday to apply a disputed legal doctrine that would permit killers to escape murder charges if they were intoxicated or mentally impaired at the time of the crime. The justices heard argument in a pivotal case among several that have arisen following the abolition of the controversial "diminished capacity" mental defense by the Legislature in 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Jan Stuart, Special to The Times
In "Diminished Capacity," Alan Alda plays a former tavern owner in rural Missouri who is succumbing to dementia with style. To pass the time, he rigs the keyboard of an old manual typewriter to a baited fish hook, then waits for the fish to pull on the line and snap a letter onto a sheet of paper. After a small eternity (and only after judicious editing), poems happen.
OPINION
January 4, 2009
Re "The harsh realities of mental illness," Opinion, Dec. 29 Robert David Jaffee's Op-Ed article depicts a story of hope -- one that is especially encouraging because we often hear only of the tragic consequences that befall individuals with severe mental illness, their families and society at large. The failure to provide treatment to people suffering from mental illness is an often-overlooked cause of not only homelessness but of victimization, incarceration and death. For every 20 public psychiatric beds that existed in the U.S. in 1955, only one such bed existed in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Jan Stuart, Special to The Times
In "Diminished Capacity," Alan Alda plays a former tavern owner in rural Missouri who is succumbing to dementia with style. To pass the time, he rigs the keyboard of an old manual typewriter to a baited fish hook, then waits for the fish to pull on the line and snap a letter onto a sheet of paper. After a small eternity (and only after judicious editing), poems happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1986 | GARY JARLSON, Times Staff Writer
When Richard L. Smith was first arrested in connection with the 1984 murder of his girlfriend's ex-husband, few of his friends, colleagues and students believed the popular and respected Cal State Fullerton professor could have killed someone. They believed in his innocence to the extent that more than 75 of them banded together to pay $75,000 in attorney fees and to post $200,000 bail. Some even put up equity in houses to get him out of jail.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaczynski's mental problems may be the focus in the defense against charges that he built the homemade bombs that killed two people and maimed two others, court papers show. Defense attorneys filed documents Wednesday saying they intend to seek testimony from expert witnesses about Kaczynski's mental condition.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He must be nuts, right? Who but a crazy man would live alone for 25 years in a shack no bigger than a movie star's closet? Who but a crazy man would forgo electricity, a phone, running water and haircuts while dining on squirrel and porcupine roasted over a fire in the woods? Who but a crazy man would pedal a rickety bicycle through Montana snowdrifts, fetching supplies from a town five miles away? To his defense attorneys, Theodore John Kaczynski most definitely is sick.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He must be nuts, right? Who but a crazy man would live alone for 25 years in a shack no bigger than a movie star's closet? Who but a crazy man would forgo electricity, a phone, running water and haircuts while dining on squirrel and porcupine roasted over a fire in the woods? Who but a crazy man would pedal a rickety bicycle through Montana snowdrifts, fetching supplies from a town five miles away? To his defense attorneys, Theodore John Kaczynski most definitely is sick.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaczynski's mental problems may be the focus in the defense against charges that he built the homemade bombs that killed two people and maimed two others, court papers show. Defense attorneys filed documents Wednesday saying they intend to seek testimony from expert witnesses about Kaczynski's mental condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contending that he suffered from a mental impairment called "dementia" for four years before his bad investments pushed Orange County into bankruptcy, former Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron demanded access Monday to any evidence gathered by county prosecutors that might persuade a judge to sentence him to probation.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to allow defendants to evade a charge of murder on grounds they were drunk or mentally impaired when the killing occurred. The court unanimously rejected what prosecutors called an attempt to resurrect the controversial "diminished capacity" defense. The legal defense had been abolished by the Legislature and the voters under Proposition 8, a 1982 anti-crime initiative.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court was asked by defense attorneys Tuesday to apply a disputed legal doctrine that would permit killers to escape murder charges if they were intoxicated or mentally impaired at the time of the crime. The justices heard argument in a pivotal case among several that have arisen following the abolition of the controversial "diminished capacity" mental defense by the Legislature in 1981.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contending that he suffered from a mental impairment called "dementia" for four years before his bad investments pushed Orange County into bankruptcy, former Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron demanded access Monday to any evidence gathered by county prosecutors that might persuade a judge to sentence him to probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1986 | GARY JARLSON, Times Staff Writer
When Richard L. Smith was first arrested in connection with the 1984 murder of his girlfriend's ex-husband, few of his friends, colleagues and students believed the popular and respected Cal State Fullerton professor could have killed someone. They believed in his innocence to the extent that more than 75 of them banded together to pay $75,000 in attorney fees and to post $200,000 bail. Some even put up equity in houses to get him out of jail.
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