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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The actors, finished with the run-through, pause. The director, not pausing, jumps up from his chair. He crosses over the bright red tape that marks the edge of the imaginary stage in the rehearsal room and huddles with his cast. "You don't have to move so quickly . It's not like I'm asking you to behave like marionettes," he says gently. "Rather, it's a case of discovering, moment to moment, how you get from this line to that line, this move to that move. That takes time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN
There's nothing better for the theater's intellectual health than a scandal--of the proper sort. Not the sleazy kind where Miss Z is arrested for using controlled substances, or where Mr. Y has to explain what he did with the grant money. I mean an old-fashioned artistic cause celebre , where the onlooker is forced to do some hard thinking about the principles at issue.
NEWS
March 28, 1987
Fred Kahan, retired Los Angeles-area director of the Jewish National Fund of America, the support organization that has turned millions of desert acres into the nation of Israel, died Tuesday. He was 77 and died in his Studio City home of an apparent aneurysm, a spokesman for the fund said. Born in Jerusalem as the descendant of 11 generations of rabbis, Kahan came to the United States after World War I and attended a seminary in New Jersey.
NEWS
August 18, 1987
Clarence Brown, one of Hollywood's most prolific directors, who enhanced the careers of such diverse stars as Greta Garbo, Clark Gable, Norma Shearer and Elizabeth Taylor, has died at age 97, it was learned today. Brown died late Monday night at St. John's Medical Center of kidney failure. He had been retired since the early 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "Look Back in Anger," playwright John Osborne's brutal 1956 drama, the working-class antihero Jimmy Porter attacks his wife Alison, by accusing her of being "pusillanimous. " In their garbage-strewn Midlands flat, the disaffected young man cruelly barks out its meaning: "Wanting of firmness of mind, of small courage … cowardly. " "Pusillanimous" is a word one would hardly associate with Sam Gold, the ambitious 33-year-old director of the Roundabout Theater's revival of the British classic, which stars Matthew Rhys, most recently of the TV drama "Brothers & Sisters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Costa Mesa preschool where two students were killed and five others injured after a man intentionally drove his Cadillac into a crowded playground in 1999 has quietly closed its doors. The Southcoast Early Childhood Learning Center, which survived that tragedy as well as a bruising battle with neighbors opposed to a security fence installed in the wake of the killings, closed Sept. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
When screenwriter Don Roos ("Boys on the Side," "Single White Female") cast "Friends" star Lisa Kudrow in a key role for his 1998 filmmaking debut, "The Opposite of Sex," an exciting new director-actress collaboration emerged. Roos' bitingly funny take on love, sex and responsibility took flight when Kudrow's Lucia -- a tart-tongued, opinionated, spinsterish teacher with unexpected reserves of pained optimism -- was on screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I have so many questions after seeing "After Earth," the new sci-fi action-adventure starring Will Smith and his 14-year-old son, Jaden. First, just how much blinding power is in that famous smile of his? On the day Will Smith floated the idea - "sci-fi flick, father-son friction, me and the kid will star" - did its sheer warmth and radiance make everyone in the room believe that anything, including "After Earth" as an actual, viable movie, was possible? Someone wrote the checks.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
In the long, photo-decorated hallway that leads to the terrace garden dining area at Soho House, producer Michael Barnathan paused to point out a black-and-white snapshot of him and his wife grinning broadly as they celebrated their three Critics' Choice Awards for "The Help. " Barnathan and co-producer Chris Columbus are unabashedly, pinch-me-to-be-sure-this-is-real giddy about the gathering awards momentum behind the film, which focuses on the lives of black maids in Mississippi at the start of the civil rights movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2013 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
For years, the top director of Los Angeles County's child protective services agency sat in an office hidden behind an unmarked, locked door. When current director Philip Browning arrived, he made an early decision to use a doorstop to prop it open. And he publicly posted his own name and picture as well as those of his managers, prompting protests by some who feared for their safety. "The goal is to change the culture," Browning said, acknowledging the embarrassment that some feel at an agency shamed by repeated failures that have allowed at-risk children to die. "What I would like to see is for the worker to be so proud of what he's doing that he tells his next-door neighbor where he works, which is not the case right now. " Browning, 66, who rises at 4:15 a.m. to run five miles before work, is attempting to revive one of the most troubled public agencies in Southern California.
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