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NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Kathleen Sebelius, who helped guide the rocky and controversial rollout of President Obama's landmark healthcare law, is stepping down as Health and Human Services secretary after about five years, according to a senior administration official. In her place, the president plans to nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget. Sebelius was not pressured to resign, according to the administration official. But she leaves after presiding over the disastrous launch of the health law's new online insurance marketplaces last fall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The documentary "Peter Brook: The Tightrope" illuminates the two-time Tony-winning theater director's method of working with actors - but little else. The acting exercise of the film's title involves thespians toeing diagonally across a Persian rug, as if on a tightrope, swaying their bodies and stretching out their arms as if to gain balance. The difficulty escalates with the introduction of imaginary obstacles such as fires and cascades of water. So instructional is the film, directed by Brook's son, Simon, that it feels like one of those P90X or Insanity home fitness programs: Try this at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Dreadfully earnest about its politics in the manner of John Sayles at his preachiest, the indie historical thriller "No God, No Master" draws a line from the civil unrest of 1920s anti-immigrant America to today's terror-besotted society that's so obvious, a freshman napping in social studies class couldn't miss it. Writer-director Terry Green packs his tale of exploding bombs, striking workers, anarchist cells and overreacting U.S. authorities with...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By David Ng and Mike Boehm
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has plucked an established figure from the art museum world who has extensive knowledge of cinema to lead its highly anticipated $300-million movie museum. Kerry Brougher, a veteran art curator who worked at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art for 14 years, has been named the director of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, said a spokeswoman for the academy on Tuesday. It is unclear when Brougher will start his new job. The museum isn't scheduled to open until 2017 and the spokeswoman said academy officials were unable to comment further on Brougher's appointment at this time.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
NFL Players Assn. Executive Director DeMaurice Smith has spoken out in support of the ruling allowing Northwestern football players to unionize, saying it has nothing to do with college athletes looking for a paycheck. "In the more than 100 years since the NCAA was founded, it has not allowed athletes to have a seat at the table to discuss serious issues and therefore has done little to address full medical coverage for injuries sustained, limitations on practice time, scholarship shortfalls and rules to make promised education a reality," Smith wrote in an op-ed piece published Tuesday night by The Huffington Post.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Northwestern assailed the decision of a National Labor Relations Board regional director that the school's scholarship football players are employees and can unionize in an appeal filed Wednesday with the full board. "In this unprecedented decision, the regional director set out to alter the underlying premise upon which college varsity sports is based," Northwestern lawyers wrote. The 50-page request for review repeatedly jabbed Peter Sung Ohr, the NLRB's regional director in Chicago who ruled in favor of former Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter and the College Athletes Players Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Through nearly 70 years of acclaim as a theater, film and television director - most particularly as a theater director - Peter Brook has been called a magician many times. In 1962, the British critic Kenneth Tynan extolled him not for pulling a rabbit out of his hat but for an unprecedented approach to "King Lear" that for the first time made the character a palpably human, "edgy, capricious old man" instead of "the booming, righteously indignant titan of old. " Brook, who recently celebrated his 89th birthday, clearly absorbed a fundamental lesson of "King Lear": considering its pitfalls, perhaps retirement is best put off as long as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The Academy Award-nominated writer and director Lisa Cholodenko ("The Kids Are All Right," "High Art") will serve as guest director of the Los Angeles Film Festival, organizers announced Tuesday. The festival takes place June 11-19 in downtown L.A. Festival director Stephanie Allain said in a statement that Cholodenko's work "exemplifies our mission of supporting artists who are diverse, innovative, and have a unique point of view. " Cholodenko is currently in post-production on "Olive Kitteridge," a four-part HBO miniseries based on Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By David Ng
Kerry Brougher, a veteran art museum curator who has worked at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, has been named the director of the new Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences confirmed on Tuesday. Brougher is currently the chief curator of the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Before that, he worked as a curator at MOCA. Construction of the $300-million museum on the campus of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is expected to begin later this year.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- New draft rules limiting greenhouse gases from existing power plants will give states the tools to curtail emissions that drive climate change without shuttering lots of facilities and threatening electric reliability, said Gina McCarthy, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, at a panel discussion in Washington on Monday. “Nothing we do can threaten reliability,” McCarthy said at a conference hosted by the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington think tank, especially because “in a changing climate, it will be increasingly challenging to maintain a reliable energy supply.” In a sweeping speech on climate change in June, President Obama directedthe EPA to develop rules to cut greenhouse gases from power plants, the single largest domestic source of heat-trapping emissions.
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