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Dirty Tricks

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OPINION
January 11, 2014
Re "Emails link Christie aide to scandal," Jan. 8 New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie denies direct responsibility for the retaliatory traffic jam in Fort Lee, whose mayor refused to endorse the governor for reelection. Christie may say the traffic tie-up was the action of rogue staff, but he must accept responsibility for presiding over a moral swamp in which such a vicious scheme would even be considered. The GOP's dirty tricks go back to Richard Nixon. The catalog of uncivil Republican actions demonstrates a lack of consideration for the interests of the American people: holding up important nominations, shutting down the government, threatening to default on the debt and doing everything possible to undermine healthcare reform (and having the chutzpah to complain about its implementation)
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 11, 2014
Re "Emails link Christie aide to scandal," Jan. 8 New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie denies direct responsibility for the retaliatory traffic jam in Fort Lee, whose mayor refused to endorse the governor for reelection. Christie may say the traffic tie-up was the action of rogue staff, but he must accept responsibility for presiding over a moral swamp in which such a vicious scheme would even be considered. The GOP's dirty tricks go back to Richard Nixon. The catalog of uncivil Republican actions demonstrates a lack of consideration for the interests of the American people: holding up important nominations, shutting down the government, threatening to default on the debt and doing everything possible to undermine healthcare reform (and having the chutzpah to complain about its implementation)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993
Terrible! The Republicans have another dirty trickster at work, and his name is Bill Clinton. JOHN K. LOGAN Rancho Palos Verdes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A political action committee that apparently formed last year to hurt the San Diego mayoral bid of Carl DeMaio by reminding voters that he is gay has been fined $7,500 for violating campaign disclosure laws. The group, called Conservatives for Gay Rights Supporting Carl DeMaio for Mayor 2012, did not provide the names of its principals or a valid street address, according to the city Ethics Commission, which announced the fine Friday. It also did not keep records explaining its expenditures, the commission said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
If Perot expects the American people to believe him and vote for him, he had better release the names of the people who told him that the Republicans were plotting dirty tricks. To fail to do so would be an incredible obstruction of justice. If crimes were committed and he knows the facts, the American people deserve to know. It seems truly preposterous at this point to make those sorts of allegations without the basis of any one credible shred of evidence. GARY TIGHE Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1987
As any serious student of Soviet affairs will tell you, the jury is still out on Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's much-ballyhooed policy of glasnost , or openness, in discussing problems facing the Soviet Union. There is a promising, though still limited, new willingness to allow open discussion of internal problems. But Soviet propagandists have plainly not abandoned their dirty tricks in dealing with the outside world. Charles Z. Wick, director of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2001
Los Angeles voters go to the polls today with still a few unanswered questions about who the best candidates are. There are many candidates and a few close races that make for tough decisions. But there are some ugly questions that linger, questions that should not have had to be raised: Who was behind the deceptive and divisive attack phone calls aimed at mayoral candidates Steve Soboroff and Antonio Villaraigosa? Who was directing those last-minute dirty tricks?
WORLD
April 23, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto on Tuesday faced the most serious political crisis of his young government, an explosive dispute with rival parties over electoral dirty tricks that could imperil his ambitious reform plans. Peña Nieto's highly touted Pact for Mexico, a kind of blueprint for his administration's agenda that had seemed to have won consensus from most major political groups, was on the verge of collapse after fresh reports of vote-buying by the president's Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. The government was forced to cancel a series of public events under the auspices of the Pact for Mexico to avoid the embarrassment of a boycott by the main opposition factions.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
You have only days until you start your New Year's resolutions, and we're going to bet a lot of you have resolved to slim down in 2012. Speaking of betting...that's become a popular way to diet, with diet betting sites popping up on the Internet promising to help you lose a reasonable amount of weight by betting among your friends who will get there first in a set amount of time, and the winner gets the pot. Some sites allow you to bet against yourself....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
After dodging resistance from Richard Nixon loyalists and Watergate-era operatives, the cold-war historian who oversaw the dramatic metamorphosis of the former president's library from roadside attraction to respected federal institution is stepping aside. Timothy Naftali, 49, who presided over the transfer of the long-ridiculed private library to federal hands in 2007, will leave Nov. 19 and said he plans to turn his focus to finishing a book he's been researching on the 37th president's great rival: John F. Kennedy.
OPINION
December 7, 2009
Norway's environment minister called the United Nations climate negotiations starting today in Copenhagen "the most difficult talks ever embarked upon by humanity." They are also probably the most important; at stake in this gathering of 190 nations intended to draft a successor to the Kyoto Protocol are the future of human civilization and the survival of countless plant and animal species threatened by climate change. Yet even at a time when unity of purpose is crucial, global warming deniers have stepped up their dirty tricks campaign and scored their biggest victory to date.
WORLD
February 25, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Call it urban warfare for the rich and richer. Mexico City's elite is up in arms over plans to build roadway tunnels and overpasses through lovely suburban neighborhoods, a project that critics say would push the city's destructive sprawl into forests and a vital aquifer when fresh air and water are already scarce. Potential beneficiaries of the project are inhabitants of an even wealthier suburb, not to mention the politician who would get a boost from the high-profile works.
OPINION
November 9, 2008
Re "Election day -- at last," Opinion, Nov. 4 Political scientist Larry Sabato rhetorically asks, "Shouldn't we be laboring to construct a legislated code of ethics to end dirty tricks once and for all?" In a word, no. There is, after all, that pesky 1st Amendment. One man's dirty trick is another man's right to speak, castigate, smear or condemn. That's what it means to live in a free society. The first to agree with that proposition would have been that known "atheistic coward," Thomas Jefferson, and his 1800 electoral opponent, the "hideous hermaphroditical character," John Adams.
OPINION
February 9, 2008
Re "My dirty tricks," Opinion, Feb. 3 Allen Raymond's screed on the inevitability of nasty tactics reeks of a jaded cynicism that would as easily excuse a date rape by saying "she asked for it." This dirty-trickster-turned-confessor also manages to glide through the revelation of the crime for which he was jailed -- jamming the phone bank of a Democrat running against his candidate -- without saying whether that maneuver swung the election in his candidate's favor. That Raymond was jailed is somewhat moot if his blunt-force methods had their intended effect and were allowed to stand -- but he wouldn't tell us. If his bottom-line advice is to play dirty because it works, we're in for one hell of a race to the bottom when all sides start shooting -- I mean, swinging.
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