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Dirty Water

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
By the hundreds of thousands each year, they sail to Avalon by ferry and cruise ship for diving trips, glass-bottom boat tours and to lounge on the beach in the Catalina Island town 26 miles off the Southern California coast. Yet the same crystal-clear water that draws tourists also harbors an embarrassing hazard. For most of the last decade, Avalon Harbor Beach has ranked among the most polluted in the state, tainted with human sewage that puts swimmers at risk. Even though the city of 4,000 has spent $3.5 million testing and rehabilitating sewer lines, the water is no cleaner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Judi Dash
Whether you've tracked in snow, mud, dirt or sand, there's no reason you should trouble yourself with scrubbing the floors of your weekend getaway or vacation rental. Just let loose the new Scooba 450 , a little robot floor mopper from the same folks who created the popular do-it-itself iRobot Roomba carpet vacuum. The Scooba 450 is a 14 1/2 -inch-diameter rechargeable disk that automatically propels its 9-pound self across wood, tile (or any uncarpeted floor), spinning and spiraling around the room, its sensors gauging the size of the floor, and redirecting its efforts when it bumps into a wall or other obstruction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2006 | Andrew Ryan, The Associated Press
The song "Dirty Water" blares at Fenway Park after every Red Sox victory and has become part of the winning soundtrack of baseball-crazy Massachusetts. But the band that wrote the 1966 hit says it is also used in Budweiser commercials, and for that the rock 'n' rollers are none too happy. The Standells filed a federal lawsuit last week claiming that Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. used "Dirty Water" without permission in commercials to try to tap into the song's connection with the team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
When Echo Park Lake reopened earlier this year after a $45-million makeover, locals flocked to see the newly installed lotus plants, which were making their return to the lake after a mutiyear absence.   So this winter, some passersby have looked at the lake and become alarmed. For weeks now, the bright green lotus leaves that once shot into the air have become brown and wilted. The bed of flowers now droop onto the water like a sea of broken miniature umbrellas. The scene has left some residents and visitors wondering: Did the plants die again?
SCIENCE
April 12, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Harvard chemist Daniel Nocera recently developed the world's first practical artificial leaf - a silicon-based device that could use sunlight to split water and create clean fuel. Now, the scientist says he's improved the leaf - making it able to self-heal and to work even in dirty water. Nocera discussed the advances this week at the American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans. The artificial leaf has been called a holy grail for decades, and scientists had been working on designing an efficient device that, like plants, can use sunlight to create energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992
Mobile car washers pollute residential areas not only by dumping dirty water into storm drains ("Polishing Off the Competition," Oct. 28), thus violating the federal Water Quality Act, but they also pollute air and ear by running diesel-powered generators for high pressure water hoses, emitting high decibels with industrial vacuum cleaners, and I have even observed the use of gasoline-powered leaf blowers to dry cars. If you have neighbors who have their several cars "detailed" once a week, it can be quite a nuisance.
NEWS
May 18, 2003
Re " 'Polio Pond' Cure Is Due," April 14: San Juan Creek is described as an urban-fed channel that deposits dirty water in Dana Point. In fact, it is an equestrian sewer, with San Juan Capistrano's 1,200 horses living along its banks. Our horse stables are an industry, and they need to process their runoff like all other industries. Dave Solt San Juan Capistrano
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | From Reuters
Rivers in the Philippine capital are biologically dead because of industrial pollution and environmental decay, the Department of Natural Resources said on Tuesday. Department spokesman Amando Dayrit said industrial waste and garbage have killed marine life in metropolitan Manila's 40 rivers, and the dirty water poses a health hazard to thousands of people living on squatter colonies lining river banks. "There are no more fish or any other living organisms in these rivers," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will flush accumulated sediment from underground water mains in the southwest section of Van Nuys now through May 9, City Councilman Marvin Braude said. Water service will not be interrupted in the area being flushed--which is bordered by Oxnard Street, Hazeltine Avenue, Magnolia Boulevard and the San Diego Freeway--however, water pressure will be reduced, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Nancy Smith and her family were strolling around Echo Park Lake on Thursday when they noticed an odd, brown patch in the water. Smith visited the lake as recently as August and recalled that back then, its bright green lotus plants shot into the air. But on the day after Christmas, the wilted bed of bronze flowers before her drooped onto the water like a sea of broken miniature umbrellas. "I've walked around this park in the winter and I don't remember it ever quite looking like this," said Smith, 56, a lawyer from La Crescenta.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
One of the world's great rodeos will go on “come hell or high water.” Calgary Stampede officials announced Monday that Canada's ultimate rodeo will run  as scheduled July 5-14, despite extensive flooding to the grounds and the city itself. "We have pumped millions of gallons of water from our facilities, scraped the mud from our tarmac, commenced the cleanup of our park, all to welcome guests from around the world," Stampede president Bob Thompson said. "We will be hosting the greatest outdoor show on Earth, come hell or high water," he said.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Harvard chemist Daniel Nocera recently developed the world's first practical artificial leaf - a silicon-based device that could use sunlight to split water and create clean fuel. Now, the scientist says he's improved the leaf - making it able to self-heal and to work even in dirty water. Nocera discussed the advances this week at the American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans. The artificial leaf has been called a holy grail for decades, and scientists had been working on designing an efficient device that, like plants, can use sunlight to create energy.
OPINION
December 26, 2012 | By Matthew King
I told myself I had only come to look at the surf, but who was I kidding? Powerful head-high waves reeled off the rock jetty that marks the northern end of Manhattan Beach's El Porto surf break. A light but steady drizzle had fallen hours earlier; now an offshore breeze groomed the sea like corduroy. In my car, perched along the bluff, I gazed longingly at the half a dozen surfers circling in the lineup, all jockeying to latch onto a feathering wave. Wave riders in L.A. welcome winter storms, which open a narrow window of good surf created by strong swells, favorable winds and new sandbars.
OPINION
May 20, 2012
Re "Firm wants to tap liquid gold in the Mojave Desert," May 16 The Cadiz Inc.project will drain an aquifer in the eastern Mojave Desert and pipe it to the lawns of Orange County, reaping billions for the company. Conspicuously absent from the debate is the government of San Bernardino County, which was required to produce an environmental review but punted it to a water district nearly 200 miles away. Now it has moved to exempt the Cadiz project from the local groundwater law, signing away its enforcement authority for the laughably weak provisions of the exemption agreement, which, among other things, waits an entire decade before even calculating harm to the aquifer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
By the hundreds of thousands each year, they sail to Avalon by ferry and cruise ship for diving trips, glass-bottom boat tours and to lounge on the beach in the Catalina Island town 26 miles off the Southern California coast. Yet the same crystal-clear water that draws tourists also harbors an embarrassing hazard. For most of the last decade, Avalon Harbor Beach has ranked among the most polluted in the state, tainted with human sewage that puts swimmers at risk. Even though the city of 4,000 has spent $3.5 million testing and rehabilitating sewer lines, the water is no cleaner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994
Thank you, Los Angeles Times and, in particular, our Times carrier. On that awful Monday morning of Jan. 17, frightened beyond any fright we have ever felt, afraid to go back into our house and with dirty water, mud and rocks two feet deep rushing down our street, we were sitting in our car trying to decide what to do--and who came riding by but our Times carrier? What a welcome, normal sight. We later found out that a water tank, holding 500,000 gallons, had ruptured, causing the flood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Nancy Smith and her family were strolling around Echo Park Lake on Thursday when they noticed an odd, brown patch in the water. Smith visited the lake as recently as August and recalled that back then, its bright green lotus plants shot into the air. But on the day after Christmas, the wilted bed of bronze flowers before her drooped onto the water like a sea of broken miniature umbrellas. "I've walked around this park in the winter and I don't remember it ever quite looking like this," said Smith, 56, a lawyer from La Crescenta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2011 | Michael Finnegan and Gale Holland
The opening of a new health and science center at Los Angeles Valley College should have been cause for celebration. The complex included the first new classroom building on the campus in more than three decades. There were chemistry and biology labs, a greenhouse, an aviary, even mock hospital rooms for nurse training. But when students and professors poured through the doors, excitement quickly turned to dismay. Ceiling panels and floor tiles were askew. Crooked cabinet doors would not shut.
OPINION
February 8, 2011 | Jim Newton
The Los Angeles City Council's 14th District takes in Eagle Rock, Highland Park, Mount Washington, El Sereno and a chunk of central Los Angeles, and it historically has featured some of the city's most fervid politics. It's where Richard Alatorre once held office, where Antonio Villaraigosa knocked off Nick Pacheco in 2003 and where Jose Huizar thwarted Pacheco's attempted comeback when Villaraigosa went on to be mayor. This year, for the second time in recent memory, it is supplying that great rarity: a credible challenge to a council incumbent.
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