Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDisability Benefits
IN THE NEWS

Disability Benefits

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1985 | BILL FARR, Times Staff Writer
More than 10 months have passed since they interred the ashes of Ronald James Beck in the Los Angeles National Cemetery during a military ceremony. But in court and Congress he is not forgotten. The family of the 37-year-old Vietnam veteran, who committed suicide after his disability benefits were mistakenly cut off, went into federal court here last week to seek $8 million in damages from the Veterans Administration and the Disabled American Veterans, a private group that aids veterans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 5, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Imagine you've lost your job, which doesn't take a lot of imagination in a state with 1.3 million people out of work. Now imagine your unemployment checks have stopped and you can't decipher the explanation from the state Employment Development Department. So you call the phone number on the form and it rings … and rings … and rings…. That's the reality for countless Californians who have turned to the state's unemployment office for help, only to find that the phones go unanswered.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1985
Conrad's analogy of Scrooge's medical examination of Tiny Tim to the Social Security Disability Program (Dec. 10) is apropos. The situation is so analogous I don't think Conrad realizes how close he has come to the truth. The Social Security Administration paid its first disability benefits in 1956. At that time, only people who had disabilities of long, continued and indefinite duration or whose conditions were expected to end in death were paid. These were "America's throwaways" much like the unrepentant Scrooge referred to the work houses and prisons to aid the less fortunate.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will ultimately cost between $4 trillion and $6 trillion, with medical care and disability benefits weighing heavily for decades to come, according to a new analysis. The bill to taxpayers so far has been $2 trillion, plus $260 billion in interest on the resulting debt. By comparison, the current federal budget is $3.8 trillion. The costs of the wars will continue to mount, said the study's author, Linda Bilmes, a public policy expert at Harvard University.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | Associated Press
The government Monday said it will notify more than 500,000 children who were denied Social Security disability benefits over the past 12 years that it is willing to reconsider their claims. The youngsters may be due more than $2 billion in retroactive benefits to be paid out over the next five years, the Social Security Administration said.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Black & Decker Corp. won a U.S. Supreme Court decision Tuesday bolstering employers' authority to deny disability benefits to workers. The justices ruled unanimously that employer-sponsored benefit plans don't have to defer to the opinion of a worker's treating doctor when making a disability decision. The justices set aside a lower court ruling that had sided with a former Black & Decker worker seeking benefits because of back problems.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian signed legislation Tuesday to boost disability benefits for injured workers by 50% while beginning what lawmakers expect to be a years-long job of overhauling California's $8-billion workers' compensation system. The two bills were described as a bipartisan compromise hammered out by legislators mediating among several of the Capitol's most combative special-interest groups: employers, labor, insurers, doctors and lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1985 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
A Costa Mesa psychiatrist who contended that mental illness caused him to have sexual relationships with his female patients and tell them it was part of their therapy was denied disability benefits Monday by an Orange County Superior Court jury.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2011 | By Shan Li
Now there's another reason to be careful about what you post on Facebook: Your insurance company may be watching. Nathalie Blanchard found out the hard way. Struggling with depression, the 30-year-old from Quebec, Canada, took a medical leave in early 2008 from her job as an IBM technician. Soon after, she began receiving monthly disability benefits from her insurer, Manulife Financial Corp. A year later and without warning, the payments stopped. A representative of the Toronto insurance company told Blanchard that Manulife used photos of her on Facebook ?
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Ninety members of a single Georgia family collected more than $1 million in federal disability benefits before the government discovered that they did not qualify. The inspector general for the Social Security Administration put part of the blame on a local doctor, who, he said, may have been approving dubious disability claims, and on the administration for using him.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: When I moved into my apartment building about two years ago, I had a job as a physical therapy assistant. About three months ago, however, I had a bad bicycle accident, and now I can't work. Currently, my main source of income is disability insurance from my employer and state disability benefits. When the apartment manager saw me around the apartment complex during the day, she asked me whether I was still working. I explained to her that I was on disability. She seemed concerned about this and about a week later served me with a 60-day notice terminating my tenancy.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — Hopes for a last-minute agreement to overhaul the state's $11-billion workers' compensation system are growing as the end of the 2012 legislative session approaches. A small group of labor unions and large employers has been meeting quietly since April to craft legislation that would cut administrative, legal and medical costs enough to fund a significant boost in benefits paid to workers who suffer permanent disabilities from job-related injuries or illnesses. And an agreement seems imminent.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2012 | By Jamie Goldberg, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — Ruth Moore described herself as a "vivacious" 18-year-old serving in the Navy when, she says, a superior raped her outside a club in Europe. After that, she attempted suicide and was discharged, diagnosed with borderline personality disorder — an ailment she says she did not have. Moore applied for disability benefits through the Department of Veterans Affairs but was denied multiple times — despite submitting witness testimony that she had been raped and subsequently treated for chlamydia.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2012 | David Zucchino
The war gave him flashbacks and nightmares. He flailed around in his sleep, bruising his arms. Memories of being bombed and rocketed seemed real, and painfully intense. Tech Sgt. Stanley Friedman was ultimately diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, the signature disability from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. A few weeks ago, Friedman received his first 70% disability check for PTSD from the Department of Veterans Affairs. It wasn't for service in Iraq or Afghanistan.
OPINION
April 25, 2012
The Social Security trustees projected this week that funding for retirement benefits will run short in 2033, three years sooner than had been estimated a year ago. After that, the program will be able to pay only about 75% of the amount now promised to retirees and the disabled. That's still a long way off, and lawmakers may not want to meddle with Social Security in an election year. But the longer Congress waits to deal with the problem, the harder it will be to solve. The last time lawmakers made significant changes to Social Security was in 1983, when they raised payroll taxes and gradually increased the retirement age. Those changes were made not just to solve a near-term funding crisis but also to gird the system for the baby boom generation's retirement.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that a California pilot who tried to hide that he was HIV-positive cannot sue for emotional distress after two federal agencies shared the man's medical information. In a 5-3 opinion , the court's conservative majority upheld the federal government's immunity from liability for a person who claims mental anguish or emotional distress, but who suffers no damage, such as loss of income. The decision reverses a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit that had struck down a ruling by a lower court in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1995 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case involving an Orange County man, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether disability benefits for longshore workers can be reduced or canceled if they later find higher-paying work. The court said it will hear a California case in which a longshore company argues that benefits can be reduced in such instances even if there has been no improvement in a worker's physical condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A Pasadena woman who served 12 years in theU.S. Army, including tours of duty in Iraq, filed suit Wednesday against the Department of Veterans Affairs for denying her full disability benefits because she is married to a woman. The lawsuit filed in federal court in Los Angeles by Tracey Cooper-Harris seeks a ruling that the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutionally discriminates against legally married same-sex couples. Cooper-Harris, who earned the rank of sergeant and more than 20 medals during her Army service, was honorably discharged in 2003 and married her spouse, Maggie, during the six-month period in 2008 when same-sex marriage was legal in California.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2011 | By Shan Li
Now there's another reason to be careful about what you post on Facebook: Your insurance company may be watching. Nathalie Blanchard found out the hard way. Struggling with depression, the 30-year-old from Quebec, Canada, took a medical leave in early 2008 from her job as an IBM technician. Soon after, she began receiving monthly disability benefits from her insurer, Manulife Financial Corp. A year later and without warning, the payments stopped. A representative of the Toronto insurance company told Blanchard that Manulife used photos of her on Facebook ?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|