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Disability Rights

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2003 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of disability rights advocates filed a class-action suit Thursday seeking to stop Los Angeles County from closing the renowned Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court, says the closure would violate the federal Americans With Disabilities Act and other legislation prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disabilities, because many patients would have nowhere else to turn for treatment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
UC Berkeley is making its vast library collections and course textbooks more readily available to students with visual and other impairments under an agreement reached Tuesday that could set a precedent for universities nationwide. The settlement with the nonprofit legal group Disability Rights Advocates was reached after more than a year of negotiations and will provide students with physical, developmental, learning and visual disabilities more timely access to printed materials in alternative formats such as Braille, large print and audio.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Bay Area advocacy group filed a federal lawsuit charging the Robinsons-May department-store chain with violating the Americans With Disabilities Act, citing aisles too narrow and counters too tall for wheelchairs, among other things. The suit, filed by Disability Rights Advocates, comes seven months after the group won a judgment against Macy's West, owned by Federated Department Stores Inc., forcing the company to make a variety of changes at its flagship San Francisco store.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A jury has awarded $240 million to 32 mentally disabled former workers at a turkey processing plant in Iowa, in what officials on Wednesday said was the largest such judgment in a federal abuse and discrimination case. After a week-long trial, the jury in Davenport, Iowa, deliberated for about eight hours before deciding that Henry's Turkey Service, of Goldthwaite, Texas, violated the Americans With Disabilities Act in a lawsuit brought by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting with rare bipartisan accord, the House gave its final approval Thursday to legislation that would guarantee an estimated 43 million disabled persons the same job rights and access to public facilities enjoyed by other Americans. The Senate is expected to approve the bill today and send it to President Bush, who has said he will sign it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2010
Paul Steven Miller Lawyer was disability rights expert Paul Steven Miller, 49, a lawyer who was born with a genetic condition that made him a dwarf and who later became an expert on disability rights, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in the Seattle suburb of Mercer Island. Miller taught at the University of Washington School of Law from 2004 to 2009 and had directed the university's disability studies program since 2006. He was born in Queens, N.Y., in 1961 with achondroplasia, a bone-growth disorder that causes dwarfism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1989 | BILL BOLTE, Bill Bolte is a Los Angeles writer and an activist for the civil rights of the disabled. and
On Nov. 15, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge David M. Schacter threw out a jury's award to a physically and mentally disabled woman. She'd become pregnant after having been raped, given an abortion and then sterilized--all while at Laurelwood Convalescent Hospital, owned by Western Medical Enterprises, in North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2007 | James Ricci, Times Staff Writer
Five times in the last dozen years, bills on medically assisted suicide have risen in the California Assembly, and five times they have failed. In every instance, a great deal of the credit for their demise goes to a constituency associated with advancing personal choice and civil rights -- namely, the disability rights movement. The latest attempt, Assembly Bill 374, which its backers called the California Compassionate Choices Act, failed to make it out of committee in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
SHAWN CASEY O'BRIEN is executive director of the Unique People's Voting Project, a nonprofit, nonpartisan voter registration and education project in Los Angeles by and for disabled citizens. He spoke with JIM BLAIR. * The Unique People's Voting Project, which we call UP, began in 1993 following a frustrating dispute over blocked handicapped parking spots on private commercial property in Venice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Harold H. Wilke, an armless United Church of Christ minister whose early advocacy for people with disabilities helped set the stage for a movement that ultimately won basic protections for them in areas ranging from employment to transportation, has died. He was 88. A resident of Claremont, Wilke died of heart failure Tuesday at Pomona Valley Hospital after a period of declining health.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Following a boycott against several hotel chains, leaders of disability-rights groups and representatives of the nation's hotel industry plan to meet Tuesday to discuss requirements that hotels make their pools accessible to handicapped guests. A federal requirement under the Americans with Disability Act says that the owners of pools accessible to the public must install permanent lifts for use by guests with disabilities. Such lifts cost up to $6,500 per pool. The requirement was set to take effect this year but has been postponed by the Obama administration until January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- California's precariously balanced state budget, already teetering in the continuing economic upheaval, came under further siege Tuesday as two groups announced lawsuits challenging the spending plan. School officials, including those at the L.A. Unified School District, said they would file suit Wednesday alleging that Gov. Jerry Brown and state legislators illegally manipulated California's voter-approved education funding formula to shortchange them by $2 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2010
Paul Steven Miller Lawyer was disability rights expert Paul Steven Miller, 49, a lawyer who was born with a genetic condition that made him a dwarf and who later became an expert on disability rights, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in the Seattle suburb of Mercer Island. Miller taught at the University of Washington School of Law from 2004 to 2009 and had directed the university's disability studies program since 2006. He was born in Queens, N.Y., in 1961 with achondroplasia, a bone-growth disorder that causes dwarfism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson and Elizabeth Mehren, Mehren is a former Times staff writer.
Eunice Kennedy Shriver, whose advocacy for the mentally disabled helped bring people with special needs into the mainstream of American life, has died. She was 88. Shriver, the sister of President Kennedy and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and the mother of California First Lady Maria Shriver, died early today at Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, Mass., her family said in a statement. In a speech last year at the Women's Conference in Long Beach, Maria Shriver said her mother had had several strokes.
WORLD
July 31, 2009 | Associated Press
The United States on Thursday signed a U.N. treaty enshrining the rights of the world's 650 million disabled people, saying it symbolized President Obama's commitment to upholding human rights through international agreements. The signing by U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice marked a dramatic shift from the Bush administration, which refused to take part in negotiations on the treaty, arguing that it would dilute protections for U.S. citizens under the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act.
OPINION
January 9, 2009
Re "Legal hell on wheels," Column One, Jan. 5 I have a respiratory disability, and in the past I had other serious injuries that required accommodation. I remain dismayed by the number of people, including police officers, willing to ignore nonsmoking ordinances and other accommodations. The Americans With Disabilities Act is a necessary law that should be enforced. That said, it strains credulity to describe Thomas Mundy, and those like him, as "disability rights activists."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2003 | Irwin Speizer, Special to The Times
Mary Marques-Caramico moved to this peaceful town of turn-of-the-century homes and bed-and-breakfasts less than two years ago and has quickly become one of its most recognized residents -- much to her chagrin. Tooling around town in her motorized wheelchair, she said she has been yelled at, spit at and nearly run down by a car. She regularly gets nasty phone calls and e-mails. "I used to be a very outgoing and receptive person to people on the street.
OPINION
January 9, 2009
Re "Legal hell on wheels," Column One, Jan. 5 I have a respiratory disability, and in the past I had other serious injuries that required accommodation. I remain dismayed by the number of people, including police officers, willing to ignore nonsmoking ordinances and other accommodations. The Americans With Disabilities Act is a necessary law that should be enforced. That said, it strains credulity to describe Thomas Mundy, and those like him, as "disability rights activists."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2008 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
For several hours, as he waited to get booked for petty theft at the Los Angeles County Jail in October, Peter Johnson told deputies he needed to go to the restroom. Although other inmates were free to use the facilities, Johnson -- a paraplegic -- was told there were none in the area equipped to accommodate the physically disabled. Guards, he said, seemed indifferent to his plight, telling him he simply had to wait.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Salvador Chavez is a matchmaker. He helps people with disabilities find in-home attendants to help with bathing, dressing, shopping, cooking, cleaning and other personal and household chores. He screens providers to make sure they respect the dignity of the disabled and reminds customers that workers have rights too.
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