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BUSINESS
November 13, 2011 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I live alone in an upper-level apartment. I was recently diagnosed with cancer and began chemotherapy treatments. The side effects of the treatment include dizziness and exhaustion. My physician has suggested that I try to minimize my exposure to situations that may result in injury from the side effects. He also suggested that I move to a ground-floor unit to make things easier. One the same size as mine is available, so I asked my manager if I could transfer. The manager told me she would not allow me to transfer since my lease has three more months to go. I thought because of my disability status and condition, I could request this type of transfer.
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NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Here's a bit of good news for people who like bad news: A German study suggests that people who are overly optimistic about their future actually faced greater risk of disability or death within 10 years than did those pessimists who expected their future to be worse. The paper, which appears in the March edition of Psychology and Aging, examined health and welfare surveys from roughly 40,000 Germans between ages 18 and 96. The surveys were conducted every year from 1993 to 2003.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | Maria Shriver, Maria Shriver is the first lady of California.
This has been a year filled with teachable political moments. Racism, sexism, ageism and "change" have been debated at kitchen tables and water coolers across America. But this last week, those gathered around my kitchen table have been consumed with another discussion, one that is not Democratic or Republican -- it's the "R-word" debate. The "R-word" stands for "retard." For the 6 million to 8 million Americans with intellectual disabilities and their families, this word and its hurtful use is equal to the impact of the "N-word" on an African American.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1989
Two women Long Beach police officers have sued the department, contending that the stress of persistent sexual harassment forced them to take disability leaves. Lindsey Allison of Garden Grove, the first female officer in Long Beach's police dog detail, and Melissa Clerkin of Long Beach, who was assigned to the patrol division, seek unspecified damages in their federal lawsuit against the city, Police Chief Lawrence Binkley and 18 other police officials. Binkley declined to discuss the lawsuit, which was filed Friday, and lawyers in the Long Beach city attorney's office could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1988
A former Los Angeles police officer received three years' probation and a $5,000 fine Monday, after pleading no contest to a charge of illegally applying for a disability pension. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert Altman also ordered former Sgt. John Petrosky, 37, to perform 200 hours of community service after entering his plea to one felony count of attempted grand theft, said Al Albergate, spokesman for the district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1991
Cockburn justifies clinging to his thoroughly discredited communist wish-fantasies (such as nostalgic yearning for the workers' paradise of the brutal Vietnamese and Cuban revolution) by informing us that he was "born into a communist family." So was Boris Yeltsin. One of these two gentlemen, however, has managed to overcome his congenital disability. DAFYDD AB HUGH Los Angeles
SPORTS
April 21, 1990
Perhaps Jim Murray's own struggle against visual disability has given him insight beyond the ordinary. Before and since that problem, he has seen more truth than a hundred others in the transient arena of reporting--sports or otherwise. DAVID L. ROSEN, Los Angeles
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
It's not enough for people to get regular moderate exercise as they age. Researchers say it's also important not to spend the rest your time sitting too much. In fact, for every hour of sedentary behavior, the odds were 46% greater that people older than 60 would have some disability in ordinary skills such as getting around the house and feeding themselves, according to the study published Wednesday in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health. Being sedentary will lead to problems “independent of time spent in moderate or vigorous activity,” concluded the researchers, from Northwestern's Feinberg Medical School, Rush University Medical Center, Harvard School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
We've never met the man, so we're willing to stipulate that Sen. Tom Coburn (R- Okla.), a physician who recently announced his early retirement from the Senate, is a sweetheart to have at a dinner party. That's the bottom line on Coburn offered by Bloomberg columnist Margaret Carlson, who seems genuinely bereft at the thought of his leaving Washington. " He was the most ego-free, funny and sensible person you could meet," she wrote a few days ago.  Coburn is evidently considered an engaging fellow in Washington facing serious medical problems, so you can count Carlson's piece as the harbinger of a flood of similar insider encomiums.  Curiously, however, there's very little in Carlson's column about the reason that any of us outside Washington might care one whit about Coburn -- his positions on a host of important issues, or his tactics for making his positions stick.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Thursday refused to pass a bill by Sen. Ed Davis (R-Valencia), a former Los Angeles police chief, that would allow investigators of the Employment Development Department to arm themselves. "These people don't need firearms," argued Sen. Milton Marks (D-San Francisco) of the 86 agents whose duties include investigating suspected fraud in the payment of payroll taxes, such as unemployment and disability insurance premiums. Sen.
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