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NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Alexa Vaughn
Talk of a federal government shutdown is escalating as Congress appears unable to resolve a dispute over federal disaster aid, with Republicans insisting that assistance be paid for with spending cuts elsewhere in the budget. Days remain for Congress to end the stalemate or risk shutting down the federal government. The disaster aid is included in a broader bill to fund the government for the first weeks of the 2012 fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1. “Nobody's intending to bring about a government shutdown,” said Republican Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, the House majority leader.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday declared a state of emergency in Riverside County so that victims of the Silver fire can be eligible for federal disaster aid. As of Friday evening, the fire was about 40% contained . It has burned 18,000 acres, destroyed 26 homes and injured six people, including five firefighters in the dry, rugged hills south of Banning. Residents and RV campers have been cleared to return to most of the evacuated areas. California 243 remains closed from Poppet Flats Road to Wesley Street.  The governor's emergency declaration is required for fire victims to receive assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
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NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro
After a stunning defeat, House Republican leaders are considering dropping or changing their requirement that disaster aid be paid for with spending cuts elsewhere. Republican leaders are racing the clock to avoid a government shutdown after their spending bill for the coming fiscal year, which begins Oct.1, was rejected in a surprise setback. They insisted on spending cuts to cover aid for victims of Hurricane Irene and other recent disasters. Democrats soundly rejected that approach.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
As residents in the Oklahoma City area grappled with the aftermath of the massive tornado that wiped out homes and businesses in its 20-mile path of destruction, killing at least 24 people, relief organizations solicited donations to help. By and large, the charities expressed a preference for donations of money rather than goods. Monica Diaz of the Red Cross in Los Angeles said donating money "allows us to get the items that are needed the quickest faster. " PHOTOS: Powerful tornado slams Oklahoma Donations to the Red Cross will be added to the organization's disaster relief fund, a pot used for disaster aid across the country, not just for the Oklahoma tornadoes.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
TAMPA, Fla. -- The small-government ideals that have defined the GOP as the party opens its convention here are running into the big-government needs brought on by Tropical Storm Isaac. One Republican, Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana, called on President Obama on Monday to issue a disaster declaration, unleashing the federal aid that follows, as the hurricane churned toward the Gulf Coast. "State and local governments need every tool and resource available to respond to this rapidly approaching hurricane,” Vitter said in a statement.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- When $50 billion in disaster aid for victims of Superstorm Sandy came before Congress this year, three of Oklahoma's five representatives and both of its senators were among the "no" votes. At the time, some of the Oklahoma lawmakers demanded spending cuts as a condition of aid to the hurricane-ravaged Northeast. Now that a devastating tornado has hit their state, it's not clear whether Oklahoma lawmakers who demanded budget cuts will continue to hold that line when it comes to their state's recovery efforts.  "When we increase spending in one area, we must cut spending in another area," Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.)
OPINION
September 3, 2011
Parks and Coke Re " Coke contest could save beach ," Aug. 29, and "Park won't close for two months," Aug. 31 First of all, one clap to Coca-Cola for spreading its pocket change in a somewhat positive direction with this program. My question is: Why set up a contest that begs to be exploited with "vote as many times as you can"? Oak Park, in Minot, N.D., is leading the contest to win $100,000. Minot's population is about 40,000; the park has almost 3 million votes.
OPINION
September 1, 2011
Redwood fans Re " A tale of grape vs. redwood ," Aug. 25 If you ever wished for a sneak peek into a businessperson's understanding of environmental issues, look no further than these two quotes from the article. (Be warned, some viewers may find the content disturbing.): "This is not a plan to build a mall. They're talking about growing grapes. " And then the real humdinger: "These forests can be cleared and preserved at the same time. " A visit to a dictionary is in order; first up, "ecosystem," followed by "monoculture.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
With federal disaster aid about to run out, the Democratic-led Senate will seek to advance a $6-billion package for victims of Hurricane Irene and other recent disasters, despite GOP opposition to providing emergency assistance unless it is paid for with spending cuts elsewhere. The Senate action would replenish depleted accounts at the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which has begun prioritizing aid. But the move escalates a confrontation with House Republicans, whose leaders have resisted allocating more money for emergency aid without comparable offsets elsewhere in the budget.
NEWS
February 19, 1994 | Reuters
President Clinton announced Friday that seven counties in Mississippi will be eligible for federal disaster relief aid because of a severe ice storm that hit the state last week.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
MOORE, Okla. -- It reminds me of May 3rd , they say. Tornadoes are nature's dark attempt at irony. In Moore, it's the boat foisted on top of the living room, the flattened house with the untouched basketball goal in the driveway; it's the bowling pins still standing upright in the collapsed alley. But where a single twister leaves behind incomprehensible chaos, those who know Moore's history have a double consciousness about such calamities. Because this all happened before, on a date so severe that the year, 1999, never earned mentioning.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- When $50 billion in disaster aid for victims of Superstorm Sandy came before Congress this year, three of Oklahoma's five representatives and both of its senators were among the "no" votes. At the time, some of the Oklahoma lawmakers demanded spending cuts as a condition of aid to the hurricane-ravaged Northeast. Now that a devastating tornado has hit their state, it's not clear whether Oklahoma lawmakers who demanded budget cuts will continue to hold that line when it comes to their state's recovery efforts.  "When we increase spending in one area, we must cut spending in another area," Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2013 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Masako Unoura-Tanaka fears that the world will forget the horror of March 11, 2011, when 100-foot-tall swells barreled into northeastern Japan. The tsunami, triggered by a magnitude 9 quake, killed more than 18,000 people and battered nuclear reactors in Fukushima, setting off the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl. Unoura-Tanaka had been visiting relatives in coastal Kesennuma that day and escaped by abandoning her vehicle and climbing to the top of a four-story building. "When I was on the roof, I was watching these ladies," she said.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Congress sent a a $50.5-billion relief bill to President Obama on Monday help the Northeast recover from Superstorm Sandy, ending a political furor over delays in the disaster aid. The measure cleared the Senate, 62-36. Its approval, after the president earlier this month signed a $9.7-billion flood insurance bill to help pay Sandy damage claims, would bring the relief package to more than $60 billion. "It was three months ago that Superstorm Sandy tore up the East Coast," Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
NATIONAL
January 2, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - House Speaker John A. Boehner on Wednesday set a Jan. 15 vote on a Superstorm Sandy relief bill after enraged Northeast politicians - including Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, a fellow Republican - blasted the speaker for skipping action on disaster aid in the final hours of the current Congress. Boehner scheduled the vote after a parade of officials from storm-ravaged New York, New Jersey and Connecticut criticized the Ohio Republican for refusing to allow a vote on a $60-billion aid package before the end of this congressional session.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Paul West, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - Enraged over Congress' failure to approve disaster relief for victims of Superstorm Sandy, Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey unloaded Wednesday on House Speaker John A. Boehner and Republican lawmakers in Washington for putting "palace intrigue" ahead of their official responsibilities. Washington politicians "will say whatever they have to say to get through the day," Christie said, adding that, as a governor, he had "actual responsibilities" -- "unlike people in Congress.
NEWS
June 3, 1985 | United Press International
President Reagan today declared a major disaster for Pennsylvania as a result of the extensive tornado damage last Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Because of the continuing threat of mudslides, the deadline for people affected by the fire last fall to apply for disaster aid has been extended to April 26. Rain-related problems in Laguna Beach, Malibu and other areas where soil erosion is a concern prompted federal officials to extend the filing period for disaster relief, which was originally scheduled to end last Friday.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The White House on Friday proposed $60 billion in spending to help the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states recover from Superstorm Sandy and shore up defenses against future disasters. Congress is expected to begin consideration of the relief measure as soon as next week, with lawmakers from states still reeling from the October storm eager for action by the end of the year. The White House budget office said in a letter to congressional leaders that its request "ensures urgent and essential needs are being met, while recognizing the need to prevent losses of this magnitude from future disasters.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- They brought photos of the devastation caused by Superstorm Sandy. They brought statistics -- more than 300,000 homes seriously damaged in New York alone, for example. And Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski (D-Md.) brought a newspaper headline: "U.S. Denies Aid to Md. Storm Victims. " Senators from the Northeast and mid-Atlantic made appeals Wednesday for swift congressional action on a disaster aid bill expected to run into tens of billions of dollars. The White House is expected to send a spending bill to Capitol Hill this week.
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