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Disaster Victims Federal Aid

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NEWS
March 4, 1995 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Condominium owners now starting to repair buildings damaged in the Northridge earthquake should brace themselves for an unexpected aftershock: They probably aren't eligible for federal disaster aid to pay for temporary housing while their homes are being fixed. Officials of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which has already paid quake victims nearly $1.
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NEWS
June 19, 1999 | Reuters
Homeowners hit by Oklahoma's deadly tornadoes in May will be offered federal money to build safe rooms that could have saved many of the 44 people killed in the storm, officials said Friday. In a $10-million pilot safety program that could be extended to other parts of the U.S., the Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would reimburse homeowners up to $2,000 for the cost of installing a shelter, which can run from $2,000 to $8,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected reversal, federal officials announced Monday that they will pay $3 million to 2,000 homeowners whose requests to be reimbursed for retrofitting their homes after the Northridge earthquake had been rejected. Under a Federal Emergency Management Agency program, the federal government had offered to reimburse homeowners who bolted their homes to foundations to prevent future damage.
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Phyllis and Gary LaCombe survived the mudslide that destroyed their Russian River home last winter. But they have yet to emerge from the bureaucratic maze they entered the night a wall of mud knocked their house from its foundations and sent the LaCombes fleeing. Even as this winter's rains begin, the LaCombes and more than 150 other California families still are waiting to see whether local officials accept a federal offer to buy slide damaged or destroyed homes across the state.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the Northridge earthquake caused $35,000 worth of damage to her North Hills home, Gloria Van Gieson decided she was going to protect herself from such exorbitant damage in the future by seismically retrofitting her home. She paid a contractor $1,800 to bolt her home to its foundation after being assured by the Federal Emergency Management Agency that it would pick up the tab under a special funding program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County residents and business owners who sustained damage in El Nino-related storms have until 6 p.m. today to file an application for federal disaster assistance, officials said Thursday. Applicants may qualify for assistance under several federal and state relief programs, said Michael Lowder, a federal coordinating officer with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996
Theft charges were filed against a couple Tuesday who authorities allege tried to bilk the government by claiming to be homeless after the Northridge earthquake. Abdol Air Vahedi, 34, and his wife, Lidia Walden Vahedi, 36, were charged with one count each of grand theft and theft through false pretenses. The Vahedis are accused of falsely applying for financial assistance from the city's housing authority after the Jan. 17, 1994, temblor.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal disaster funds granted in the days immediately following the Northridge Earthquake that officials now say must be either justified or paid back. * Los Angeles Unified School District: $60,401,250 * City of Los Angeles: $29,704,434 * City of Santa Monica: $29,108,535 * California State University Northridge: $24,359,377 * Metropolitan Transportation Authority: $15,970,840 * City of Santa Clarita: $4,998,208 * City of Fillmore: $1,015,895
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials are demanding that seven Southern California municipalities and institutions prove they properly spent nearly $166 million in federal funds earmarked for emergency earthquake repairs--or pay the money back. The state Office of Emergency Services has also frozen tens of millions of dollars in federal grants to those recipients--which include the city of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Unified School District--pending repayment of the money the state says is owed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN
Nineteen months after the Northridge earthquake, the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to establish a quake service center in hard-hit Sherman Oaks to help quake victims take advantage of governmental assistance programs. The center will begin operating next month out of the Ventura Boulevard office of Councilman Mike Feuer and be staffed for two years by two full-time workers. The salaries and expenses, totaling about $110,000, will be paid through a federal grant.
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS and ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Diana and Lawrence Muzio knew they would have to move when they woke up one morning in February to see their Laguna Niguel house splitting at the seams. They had no way of knowing that they would still be on a maddening bureaucratic treadmill nearly a year later. Even as this winter's rains begin, the Muzios and more than 150 other California families still are waiting to see whether local officials accept a federal offer to buy out damaged or destroyed homes across the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1998 | SUE FOX
Five years after a mudslide destroyed one home and badly damaged another in Agoura Hills, city officials recently learned they would be reimbursed about $1.5 million by the Federal Emergency Management Agency for repairs the city made in the Via Amistosa neighborhood. The city had been initially approved for a $500,000 grant from FEMA but the city was prevented from beginning hillside and road repairs along Calle Montecillo by a lawsuit brought by several homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of ruin and desperation brought on by the rains of El Nino, the sun may be about to shine on Louis and Reata Vaughn. The Vaughns' nightmare began when the heavy rains carved away their backyard last winter, leaving their house jutting over a newly cut ravine, wrapped in plastic and uninhabitable. Their insurance policy, like most, didn't cover landslides. Their neighbors prepared to sue them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County residents and business owners who sustained damage in El Nino-related storms have until 6 p.m. today to file an application for federal disaster assistance, officials said Thursday. Applicants may qualify for assistance under several federal and state relief programs, said Michael Lowder, a federal coordinating officer with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | From Associated Press
Standing amid the rubble and ruin of central Alabama's deadliest tornadoes, President Clinton offered the victims words of encouragement and $3.2 million in new federal aid. "We have to give people a way to look forward to tomorrow--a project, work to do, something that can be done to make a difference," Clinton said Wednesday after touring a flattened neighborhood in McDonald Chapel, a subdivision of Birmingham.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | TINI TRAN and ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The inhabitants of funky, iconoclastic Canyon Acres, one of the most storm-vulnerable neighborhoods in Southern California, are scurrying to prepare for what some fear is another date with disaster. Two people were killed, nine were injured and dozens were driven from their homes last week when heavy rains unleashed a wall of mud on Canyon Acres and a nearby enclave of artists, writers and other devotees of rural canyon life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1995 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Edward Randolph wanted was a piece of green grass. "I want a house with a yard," said Randolph, 33, after buying his first home. "I want to watch my kids play in the yard. I want a patch of grass, something I can run a lawn mower over. "I'm gonna buy a lawn mower. I can't wait." Turning tragedy into opportunity, Randolph's family is one of more than 60 in the San Fernando Valley that own their first home, thanks to an unusual earthquake assistance program.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton asked Congress on Monday to spend another $4.9 billion in emergency funds to repair the destruction that remains from the Northridge earthquake, warning that the federal government will have to shut off further relief if the money is not approved by May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
Orange County storm victims may apply for federal assistance to cover at least part of their financial losses from the recent downpours. The Federal Emergency Management Agency can provide limited funds for property damage, temporary rental payments, medical assistance, transportation costs, unemployment and a variety of other areas. Even if a person has private insurance, "you should apply anyway," said Roger Allen, a FEMA spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996
Theft charges were filed against a couple Tuesday who authorities allege tried to bilk the government by claiming to be homeless after the Northridge earthquake. Abdol Air Vahedi, 34, and his wife, Lidia Walden Vahedi, 36, were charged with one count each of grand theft and theft through false pretenses. The Vahedis are accused of falsely applying for financial assistance from the city's housing authority after the Jan. 17, 1994, temblor.
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