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Disaster Victims

BUSINESS
January 12, 1995 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what has become a post-disaster ritual for California businesses, numerous lenders and retailers have offered assistance to the victims of this month's storms, with low-interest loans and deferrals on home mortgage and credit card payments. "Knowing that these things are lurking, we have (disaster assistance programs) pretty much ready to go," said Wells Fargo spokeswoman Kathleen Shilkret. "Unfortunately, we have had too much call for this."
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NATIONAL
January 22, 2004 | Jon Marino, Times Staff Writer
The Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday established a partnership with Operation Hope Inc., a Los Angeles nonprofit organization, to provide economic counseling and loans for victims of natural disasters and national emergencies. Under the partnership, the Federal Emergency Management Agency will refer cases from as many as 12 natural disasters annually to the nonprofit's Hope Coalition, which provides free economic counseling to catastrophe victims.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nightmares continued for weeks after Judith Tuohey returned home to Lake Forest from Oklahoma City. During the day, the smallest things can bring on a rush of emotion: when someone walks by her who's just eaten a Lifesaver, it triggers her memory of the rescue workers and the masks they had to wear--soaked in wintergreen to conceal odors at the site.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
The threat of a government shutdown intensified as the House surprised its Republican leadership and rejected a bill to fund the government that required cuts in programs to pay for aid for victims of Hurricane Irene and other disasters. The legislation was narrowly defeated Wednesday after a tense afternoon of vote counting. Conservatives voted against the bill because they thought its spending level was too high, and Democrats rejected it because of the requirement for cuts. The spending bill is needed to keep the government running through Nov. 18; current spending authority stops at the end of September.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Hortense lashed Puerto Rico with punishing winds and torrents of rain Tuesday, killing eight people as it snapped trees and power lines, swelled rivers and collapsed hillsides. Half the dead were children, including an 8-year-old girl swept from her father's arms as her 13-year-old sister drowned.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first thought that passed through Robin Midkiff's mind as she entered her flood-ravaged home was, she admits, a ludicrous one. "I just thought: My God, I can't let anyone see my house this way," said Midkiff, 33. "This is not the way I keep my house. It looked like a giant washing machine had just churned everything up." The Midkiffs were visibly shaken Tuesday as they picked through the rubble of their belongings, looking for something salvageable.
NEWS
January 3, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After that nightmare voyage 33 years ago, Ivan Kolokov stopped shaving. The skin on his face kept peeling off with the razor. Nikolai Zateyev, his shipmate, lay in bed 18 months while doctors replaced his bone marrow and blood. Both sailors consider themselves lucky when they remember Boris Korchilov. Korchilov was a blue-eyed, 20-year-old ladies' man. Before the voyage he was playing volleyball and flirting.
OPINION
April 16, 2013 | By David R. Conrad and Edward A. Thomas
If the highest goal of fiscal reform is to reduce spending and better the lives of Americans, here's an idea that fits the bill: Improve the way the federal government responds to the growing number of natural disasters. Natural disasters have become increasingly costly to the United States, both in terms of the toll they take on American communities and in the direct costs of mounting a federal response. The federal government spent about $150 billion on relief efforts after Hurricane Katrina, and has so far committed about $60 billion for Superstorm Sandy.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the village of Debanaag, no rain fell for three long, hot years. The livestock--250 cows, goats and donkeys--died one by one, and the herdsmen and their families for whom the animals were the main sustenance faced hunger, then starvation. With her only child weak and sick, Ardo Sulub, 30, set off on foot on a 100-mile trek across the arid range land of southern Ethiopia in search of food and medical assistance. For 15 days, the ethnic Somali woman says, she walked in withering, dusty heat.
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