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Disaster Victims

NEWS
November 20, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buck Alvin Helm, the gritty longshoreman who had become the symbol of survival from the massive Oct. 17 Bay Area earthquake, died unexpectedly Saturday without being able to publicly tell his amazing story. A funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon in his home of Weaverville. Helm, 58, died at 7:30 p.m. Saturday of "respiratory failure" after his condition abruptly worsened, a spokesman for Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland said Sunday.
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NEWS
April 24, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan approved federal disaster assistance Wednesday for the tornado-stricken area of Sweetwater, Tex., where one person was killed, 92 were injured and more than 500 homes were left uninhabitable last Saturday. The Federal Emergency Management Agency was directed to provide eligible disaster victims with temporary housing and disaster relief grants.
NEWS
December 20, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most comprehensive study yet to appear on casualties in the Northridge earthquake has concluded that both deaths and injuries were more numerous than the official tallies by the state Office of Emergency Services and coroners in Los Angeles and Ventura counties indicate. An article on the study, appearing in a lengthy publication on the quake released last week by the state Division of Mines and Geology, found that 72 deaths were attributable to the magnitude 6.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two months after Hurricane Andrew twisted this city and much of the surrounding area into the ruins of what is called the worst natural disaster ever to strike the United States, the patient is on the mend. Electrical power has been almost completely restored, about 30% of businesses are open and, with the tents and field kitchens gone, the park across from City Hall could soon see a baseball game again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1992
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday announced a relaxation of eligibility rules to give more food stamp aid to Los Angeles riot victims. The move came three days after the ACLU Foundation of Southern California and two other public interest attorney groups filed a class-action lawsuit in U.S. District Court, claiming the federal government was illegally denying the assistance.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush handed out hugs to people in Alabama and Georgia who survived killer tornadoes, and he mourned the 20, including eight high school students, who died. "Out of this rubble will emerge a better tomorrow," Bush said. He climbed over piles of concrete, insulation, broken glass and textbooks at the shattered high school in Enterprise, Ala. Be strong and set an example for the other 1,200 students, he told the student government president and three others.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
While the federal government was taking heat over its handling of the Hurricane Andrew relief effort, Taco Bell was working in the kitchen. The Irvine-based unit of Pepsico Inc. rushed a self-contained mobile kitchen to southern Florida, along with several food carts. From them, the company is handing out free bean and beef burritos and soft drinks to hungry hurricane victims at Red Cross shelters.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
A powerful typhoon battered densely populated Bangladesh for more than eight hours Tuesday, killing at least 1,000 people and leaving millions homeless. About 5,000 fishermen were reported missing. State-run television said at least 800 people were killed in the coastal districts of Cox's Bazar, Noakhali and Bhola when 20-foot waves whipped up by 145-m.p.h. winds swept ashore.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN and ANN CONWAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like many other communities, Emerald Bay was beloved for its small-town feel, a place where children could roam free, doors remain unlocked and family values reigned. But in this pristine patch of Southern California coastline, children play on six private tennis courts, or splash around an exclusive cove where the sand is white and the ocean color matches the jewel for which the community was named. The nest of 500 homes is usually secure behind a locked gate.
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