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NEWS
June 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
As soldiers dug hundreds of bodies from flattened homes in remote northern Afghanistan on Sunday, rescue workers flew in supplies for an emergency medical clinic to help survivors of an earthquake that killed at least 2,500 people and injured 2,000. Saturday's magnitude 6.9 quake erased entire villages, sliced into mountains and triggered landslides. Some local officials said the death toll had reached 5,000. Among those killed were 140 schoolchildren in Rostaq. "We need help desperately.
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NEWS
June 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
Aid agencies ferried the most badly wounded from devastated villages in northern Afghanistan on Tuesday and appealed for more aircraft and fuel to rescue uncounted others. In the village of Kol, hundreds of people swarmed a U.N. helicopter that touched down three days after the massive earthquake that killed as many as 2,300. They had carried their injured through the winding hillside streets, past crumbled packed-mud houses, on stretchers made of sticks and old clothes.
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NEWS
February 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
New tremors split mountain roads and crumbled villages in remote northeastern Afghanistan on Saturday, worsening the lot of survivors of a devastating quake and the aid workers trying to reach them. An additional 150 deaths were reported in Saturday's shaking. Aid agencies say between 2,150 and 4,450 people died in Wednesday's magnitude 6.1 quake, which set off landslides that buried many in their rugged hillside villages. Saturday's jolts failed to register at the U.S.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Helicopters loaded with emergency aid reached northern Afghanistan on Monday, and soldiers searched remote villages devastated by a killer earthquake in search of buried victims. The quake, which hit Saturday with a magnitude of 6.9, flattened villages and triggered landslides. Aid workers and local officials believe that the death toll will reach 5,000. Thousands more are homeless. Officials estimated that as many as 80 villages were heavily damaged and a dozen villages were wiped out.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Helicopters loaded with emergency aid reached northern Afghanistan on Monday, and soldiers searched remote villages devastated by a killer earthquake in search of buried victims. The quake, which hit Saturday with a magnitude of 6.9, flattened villages and triggered landslides. Aid workers and local officials believe that the death toll will reach 5,000. Thousands more are homeless. Officials estimated that as many as 80 villages were heavily damaged and a dozen villages were wiped out.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
Snow, fog and civil war slowed relief workers struggling Sunday to reach quake-stricken northeast Afghanistan, where new tremors killed up to 250 people, according to the military alliance that controls the remote mountain region. Between 2,000 and 5,000 people are believed to have been killed in Wednesday's 6.1-magnitude earthquake and its aftershocks, and thousands left homeless by the tremors and landslides are suffering amid subfreezing temperatures.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Thousands of people huddling against the cold overwhelmed aid workers reaching earthquake-racked northeastern Afghanistan on Wednesday with supplies too meager to ease the enormous suffering. Shivering survivors cowered beneath plastic sheets, their only protection against the cold and snow. Women clinging to infants wrapped in ice-caked blankets begged relief workers for help.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
A strong aftershock rattled earthquake-stricken northeastern Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing at least 11 more people, leveling more villages and isolating victims from relief workers struggling to reach the snowbound region. Snow blanketed the only nearby airstrip, canceling relief flights and slowing relief convoys after a magnitude 6.1 quake on Feb. 4. U.N. trucks carrying thousands of pounds of blankets, plastic sheeting and biscuits struggled to navigate damaged roads.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
An avalanche crashed down on the Salang Highway in northern Afghanistan, burying at least 100 people, none of whom are believed to have survived, witnesses said Thursday. The victims were walking Wednesday toward the Salang Tunnel to catch a bus to Mazar-i-Sharif when a rumbling began and the snow roared down on the highway, said Jan Abdul, a traveler who reached Kabul, the capital, nearly 100 miles from the accident site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | JOHN DART
Responding to the plight of earthquake victims in Afghanistan, mosques in the San Fernando Valley area passed the collection plates after weekly community prayers Friday in a relief effort coordinated by the U.S. headquarters in Burbank of Islamic Relief Worldwide, an international agency. "We in the Valley know the destruction that an earthquake can cause," said Mudafar Al-Tawash, development manager at Islamic Relief. Nearly 5,000 people perished and thousands more are missing in the 6.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
As soldiers dug hundreds of bodies from flattened homes in remote northern Afghanistan on Sunday, rescue workers flew in supplies for an emergency medical clinic to help survivors of an earthquake that killed at least 2,500 people and injured 2,000. Saturday's magnitude 6.9 quake erased entire villages, sliced into mountains and triggered landslides. Some local officials said the death toll had reached 5,000. Among those killed were 140 schoolchildren in Rostaq. "We need help desperately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days after a deadly earthquake rumbled through northern Afghanistan, many in Orange County's Afghan community turned to Radio Payam-E-Afghan for news. Station operator Omar Khatab did not fail. He began broadcasting a live report of disaster conditions from an Afghan correspondent in the area. Afterward, "people were calling in and weeping on the phone," Khatab said. "We have a very close community as a whole. We were all devastated by the news."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | JOHN DART
Responding to the plight of earthquake victims in Afghanistan, mosques in the San Fernando Valley area passed the collection plates after weekly community prayers Friday in a relief effort coordinated by the U.S. headquarters in Burbank of Islamic Relief Worldwide, an international agency. "We in the Valley know the destruction that an earthquake can cause," said Mudafar Al-Tawash, development manager at Islamic Relief. Nearly 5,000 people perished and thousands more are missing in the 6.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Thousands of people huddling against the cold overwhelmed aid workers reaching earthquake-racked northeastern Afghanistan on Wednesday with supplies too meager to ease the enormous suffering. Shivering survivors cowered beneath plastic sheets, their only protection against the cold and snow. Women clinging to infants wrapped in ice-caked blankets begged relief workers for help.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
A strong aftershock rattled earthquake-stricken northeastern Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing at least 11 more people, leveling more villages and isolating victims from relief workers struggling to reach the snowbound region. Snow blanketed the only nearby airstrip, canceling relief flights and slowing relief convoys after a magnitude 6.1 quake on Feb. 4. U.N. trucks carrying thousands of pounds of blankets, plastic sheeting and biscuits struggled to navigate damaged roads.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
Snow, fog and civil war slowed relief workers struggling Sunday to reach quake-stricken northeast Afghanistan, where new tremors killed up to 250 people, according to the military alliance that controls the remote mountain region. Between 2,000 and 5,000 people are believed to have been killed in Wednesday's 6.1-magnitude earthquake and its aftershocks, and thousands left homeless by the tremors and landslides are suffering amid subfreezing temperatures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days after a deadly earthquake rumbled through northern Afghanistan, many in Orange County's Afghan community turned to Radio Payam-E-Afghan for news. Station operator Omar Khatab did not fail. He began broadcasting a live report of disaster conditions from an Afghan correspondent in the area. Afterward, "people were calling in and weeping on the phone," Khatab said. "We have a very close community as a whole. We were all devastated by the news."
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
Aid agencies ferried the most badly wounded from devastated villages in northern Afghanistan on Tuesday and appealed for more aircraft and fuel to rescue uncounted others. In the village of Kol, hundreds of people swarmed a U.N. helicopter that touched down three days after the massive earthquake that killed as many as 2,300. They had carried their injured through the winding hillside streets, past crumbled packed-mud houses, on stretchers made of sticks and old clothes.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
New tremors split mountain roads and crumbled villages in remote northeastern Afghanistan on Saturday, worsening the lot of survivors of a devastating quake and the aid workers trying to reach them. An additional 150 deaths were reported in Saturday's shaking. Aid agencies say between 2,150 and 4,450 people died in Wednesday's magnitude 6.1 quake, which set off landslides that buried many in their rugged hillside villages. Saturday's jolts failed to register at the U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
An avalanche crashed down on the Salang Highway in northern Afghanistan, burying at least 100 people, none of whom are believed to have survived, witnesses said Thursday. The victims were walking Wednesday toward the Salang Tunnel to catch a bus to Mazar-i-Sharif when a rumbling began and the snow roared down on the highway, said Jan Abdul, a traveler who reached Kabul, the capital, nearly 100 miles from the accident site.
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