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BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Could the real estate market be heading for a new financial storm? Maybe. Some mortgage and credit experts worry that billions of dollars of home equity credit lines that were extended a decade ago during the housing boom could be heading for big trouble soon, creating a new wave of defaults for banks and homeowners. That's because these credit lines, which are second mortgages with floating rates and flexible withdrawal terms, carry mandatory "resets" requiring borrowers to begin paying both principal and interest on their balances after 10 years.
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OPINION
November 4, 2013 | By Mark Gold and Cara Horowitz
You've probably seen the images of dolphins caught in abandoned monofilament fishing nets, or of vast areas of plastic trash floating in remote waters of the Pacific, or of sea turtles consuming plastic bags that look remarkably like one of their favorite foods: jellyfish. Or perhaps, after a rainstorm, you've walked on a beach that resembled a landfill. Some 20 million tons of plastic pollution enters the oceans each year, and it's devastating the marine environment. Plastic litter is also costly.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
With dire reports of the Obamacare website's dysfunction rising by the hour--and the deadlines for signing up for insurance moving nearer by the day--the question on everyone's lips is: Has the time come to delay the individual mandate? Health economists Nicholas Bagley and Austin Frakt say no. But they do have a workable plan for saving Obamacare from the website's meltdown. Here's the best news: It doesn't require action by Congress. The proposal is not to delay the mandate but to waive the penalty for going without coverage, which hits people who don't have insurance by next April 1. The law sets the penalty for 2014 at $95 per person or 1% of household income, whichever is greater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A malfunctioning firework caused a dramatic Fourth of July pyrotechnic disaster in Simi Valley that injured dozens of people, fire officials concluded in a report released Thursday. A five-inch-wide firework shell failed to leave its mortar tube and exploded inside, sparking a chain reaction that knocked down the display and sent debris and firework projectiles flying toward about 10,000 spectators watching hundreds of feet away. DRAMATIC VIDEOS OF ACCIDENT The incident was investigated by Cal/OSHA, CalFire and the Ventura County Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Joe Serna
A malfunctioning firework caused a dramatic Fourth of July pyrotechnic disaster in Simi Valley that injured dozens of people, fire officials concluded in a report released Thursday. A 5-inch-wide firework shell failed to leave its mortar tube and exploded inside, sparking a chain reaction that knocked down the display and sent debris and firework projectiles flying toward about 10,000 spectators watching hundreds of feet away. The incident was investigated by Cal/OSHA, CalFire and the Ventura County Fire Department.
WORLD
October 13, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - India breathed a sigh of relief Sunday as assessment teams fanned out across the eastern part of the country in the wake of the biggest storm in 14 years and found extensive property damage but relatively little loss of life. The state news service, Press Trust of India, reported that 23 people died as a result of Cyclone Phailin, most from falling trees or flying debris. Many had predicted a far higher death toll from the storm in this country of 1.2 billion people, where crisis management, regulation, planning and execution are often inadequate and thousands lose their lives each year to natural disasters, building collapses, train accidents and poor crowd control.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Jim Ruland
Many movies have been awarded the dubious honor of worst film of all time. There's Ed Wood's gloriously slapdash "Plan 9 from Outer Space" or the audaciously cheesetacular "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. " But Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell make a strong case in their new book "The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made. " "The Room," released in 2003, never received widespread distribution, and its limited screenings were privately financed by the executive producer, Tommy Wiseau, who also served as writer, director and lead actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
To know where you are, it helps to know where you've been, right? So early in his deeply reported, deeply frightening story of America's massive nuclear arsenal, "Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety," investigative reporter Eric Schlosser takes us back to World War II and the Manhattan Project. The day after the "Trinity" test in the desert of New Mexico, dozens of scientists who had worked on the bomb signed a petition addressed to President Harry S. Truman.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
BOULDER, Colo. - Clancy Philipsborn stood on the banks of Boulder Creek examining the flood-level marker he helped erect. The 18-foot stone and glass tower was a bit damaged but still standing. "This piece of granite broke off," he said, running his hand over the line of sediment left on the monument by the historic floods that have swept through Colorado. He pointed to small boulders and uprooted trees littering the creek that runs through the center of this university town. "These weren't here last week.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2013 | By Jenny Deam and Michael Muskal
BOULDER, Colo. - Chinook helicopters swooped into isolated Colorado mountain areas Monday morning to rescue scores of flood victims as emergency officials described the state's mammoth disaster scene: 4,500 square miles of the Front Range - a swath the size of Connecticut. In an operation one official said was "believed to be the largest airlift rescue since Hurricane Katrina," the Colorado National Guard air fleet mobilized as soon as the weather cleared, loading its choppers with dazed and weary residents, including children wearing backpacks, the elderly and pet dogs straining at leashes.
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