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Disclosure Of Information

NEWS
September 12, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will ask Congress today for authority to levy unlimited civil fines on auto makers and suppliers that fail to report safety problems to government regulators. An administration official said the request will be part of a reform package that Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater will present at a hearing before Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). The senator will seek quick passage of legislative changes to prevent a repeat of the Firestone tire debacle, an aide said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2003 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles police officer who is accused of improperly gaining access to law enforcement databases sold confidential information to the National Enquirer, according to testimony before a police disciplinary board. "He told me he sold it to tabloids, specifically the Enquirer," said Cyndy Truhan, in sworn testimony before the board that is considering possible penalties against Officer Kelly Chrisman. The board is scheduled to resume hearings today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2004 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
In what lawyers suing the Roman Catholic Church over sexual abuse allegations claim is a major victory, a judge Friday ordered Northern California bishops to turn over personnel files on 40 priests accused of molesting children. Similar church files are being sought by prosecutors and lawyers for more than 500 people who say they were sexually abused by priests in the Los Angeles area. The documents could shed light on how the church responded to abuse allegations.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday proposed making information available on all clinical trials involving gene therapy and animal-to-human transplants, including data about deaths or serious side effects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1999 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich is calling for the Department of Children and Family Services to review its adoption policies after the lawsuit recently filed against the county by the adoptive parents of convicted killer Jeremy Strohmeyer. The motion by Antonovich instructs the department's director to review procedures for disclosure of information about the background of birth parents. The board is expected to discuss the matter Oct. 26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
University of California attorneys Thursday asked for a court order to block public disclosure of information from depositions in lawsuits filed in connection with its fertility clinic scandal. University attorneys argued in court papers that the move was necessary to protect the privacy of patients, to reassure publicity-shy witnesses and to protect the integrity of future jury pools.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2006 | From Associated Press
Vice President Dick Cheney disclosed Wednesday that he has the power to declassify sensitive government information, authority that could set up a criminal defense for his former chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. Cheney's disclosure comes a week after reports that Libby testified under oath that he was authorized by superiors in 2003 to disclose highly sensitive prewar information to reporters.
HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Requests by attorneys for Kobe Bryant seeking hospital medical records of the woman who accused him of sexual assault have raised questions about medical privacy and whether a new federal law provides sufficient protections. A sweeping federal law enacted in April was designed to prevent the release of medical information without first obtaining proper legal authority or the patient's consent.
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Environmental Protection Agency has dropped its idea of posting potential disaster casualty figures for chemical plants on the Internet, bowing to concerns that the information would aid terrorists. "The EPA and FBI recognize that chemical facilities may be a target for terrorism even without the sensitive data on the Internet," the EPA wrote in a letter to House Commerce Chairman Thomas J. Bliley (R-Va.). The Associated Press reported Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
Saying the public has the right to know how much the city spends on employee salaries, Councilman David Sullivan has won support from his colleagues to force the release of pay figures. A critic of employee salaries, Sullivan asked the City Council this week to agree to release a list of employees receiving more than $75,000. Instead, the council agreed that the compensation packages--salary and benefits--be released for all city employees, but without their names.
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