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Disclosure Of Information

NEWS
January 15, 1994 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As political tension mounted last summer between factions that either favored or opposed a commercial airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, a regional planning agency suppressed parts of an FAA-funded study showing that El Toro had the greatest potential to succeed of three area military bases coming available for conversion.
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NEWS
July 29, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Thirty-one years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court laid down the law: Prosecutors have to give defendants any information that could help exonerate them. Since then, "Brady motions"--named after the landmark Brady vs. Maryland decision--have become a central element in criminal law in the United States. Thousands are filed every year but none so widely watched as the one scheduled to be heard this morning in the O.J. Simpson murder case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2006 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles Police Commission's new policy of withholding officers' names applies not only to shootings but also to violent encounters in which police use their fists, batons, flashlights, rubber bullets or anything else at their disposal to subdue suspects, the commission's executive director said Tuesday. And the privacy protection applies not just to the officer who used the force but also to all others who played a key role in the incident.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Fred G. Luke, chairman and chief executive of Nona Morelli's II Inc., was arrested this week in Denver and charged with two felony counts of making false statements to Colorado casino regulators. Luke, 48, was seized while in Denver to appear in a civil case involving Irvine-based Nona Morelli's and its former owner, Frank Morelli Sr. The Colorado Division of Gaming charged Luke with failing to disclose a lawsuit in his October, 1993, application for a casino license.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1999 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A subdivision in Orange where an unstable hillside is threatening 30 houses was built on land previously damaged by two large landslides--a fact known to developers and city officials, but not to home buyers. In fact, the very spots where geologists 20 years ago documented those landslides were later converted into lots for more than a dozen houses, and the unstable hill now poses a threat to even more homes.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philip Morris Chairman Geoffrey C. Bible, continuing his testimony Tuesday in a big tobacco trial here, was confronted with a blizzard of internal company memos concerning the narcotic effects of smoking, including one document that compared nicotine to morphine and cocaine, and described cigarettes as "nicotine delivery devices" along with nicotine patches and gum.
NEWS
July 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
JonBenet Ramsey's skull was fractured by a vicious blow and she may have been sexually assaulted before being strangled, according to portions of her autopsy report released for the first time Monday. The 6-year-old beauty queen's body was found with ligature marks around her neck and her right wrist and there were small amounts of dried blood, bruising and abrasions in the vaginal area, according to the autopsy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once hostile adversaries, Orange County Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi and Merrill Lynch & Co. now find themselves unlikely allies as they fight to deny public release of 5,000 pages of grand jury transcripts. For 2 1/2 years, Capizzi's office and the Wall Street brokerage have sparred over the district attorney's attempt to assemble evidence that Merrill officials violated state laws as they helped Orange County borrow and gamble itself into bankruptcy.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of Harvard University's top governing board who resigned recently was upset about a proposed raise for the university's president, according to a copy of his resignation letter, dated July 14, released by the school. Harvard Corporation member Conrad K. Harper also cited his dissatisfaction with President Lawrence H. Summers' leadership, including his controversial comments in January about women's aptitude for science and math.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The award of a contract worth $750 million to build bus shelters and street kiosks has been delayed after allegations that the firm favored by the city failed to disclose past involvement in bidding irregularities in Europe. Infinity Decaux LLC was recommended by the Los Angeles Public Works Department, but the matter was placed on hold after a competitor complained that the bidder failed to disclose, as required, past violations.
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