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Disclosure Of Information

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court ruled Monday that a California law designed to aid Holocaust victims seeking compensation from insurance companies is constitutional, paving the way for potentially thousands of claims. The decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals marked the first time a higher federal court has upheld such a state statute, according to Century City attorney Frank Kaplan, who is special counsel to the California Insurance Commission on Holocaust issues.
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BUSINESS
October 29, 1999 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, WASHINGTON POST
The Internal Revenue Service has proposed a one-year pilot program in California to use electronic mail to speed the delivery of personal tax information to mortgage companies, credit bureaus and lenders. The test, which will be limited to a handful of lenders in the state, is raising alarms among privacy advocates who say that the system would make sensitive tax information so easy to transmit that more businesses could demand it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for the Los Angeles Times and other media groups urged the California Supreme Court to release grand jury testimony about the Orange County bankruptcy Tuesday, but lawyers for the county's brokerage house warned that disclosure would harm innocent people and undo centuries of common law. The key legal issue before the court is whether a trial judge has the power to release grand jury testimony in cases in which an investigation does not lead to an indictment.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday asked for a formal investigation into whether national security had been damaged by recent news reports unearthing details of two controversial Bush administration anti-terrorism programs. "Numerous recent unauthorized disclosures of sensitive intelligence programs have directly threatened important efforts in the war against terrorism," Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) wrote in a letter to National Intelligence Director John D. Negroponte.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move certain to ruffle the securities industry, the head of the National Assn. of Securities Dealers' new regulatory division said Friday that she plans to give investors direct access to stockbrokers' disciplinary records via the Internet. In an interview, Mary L. Schapiro also said she intends to make it easier to alert the NASD to rule violations by brokers and Nasdaq traders. She said the NASD will soon encourage and investigate complaints sent by electronic mail.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2000 | JOHN POIRIER, REUTERS
New federal "fair-disclosure" rules for corporate information won't lead to witch hunts for potential violators, a top securities cop told Wall Street on Wednesday. But he warned that officials will remain vigilant in enforcing the controversial regulations. "I hope to convince you there is no need for fear or hysteria" over the new rules, Richard Walker, director of the Securities and Exchange Commission's enforcement division, said in remarks prepared for a Securities Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1995 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission's investigation into whether municipalities are providing proper disclosures about their financial problems and investments has expanded to Arizona's Maricopa County, securities industry sources confirmed Tuesday. The county that includes Phoenix is the latest target of scrutiny by the SEC, on top of its current probes of Orange County and the District of Columbia, knowledgeable officials said.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | JIM NEWTON and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the murder trial of O.J. Simpson scheduled to begin in three weeks, Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito took aggressive steps Monday to control information in the case, distributing a proposed order that would halt everyone connected with the investigation from publicly discussing evidence, documents or exhibits. Although Ito declined to release his proposed order to the media, a copy reviewed by The Times makes it clear that he is angry about the continuing disclosure of information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new state law aimed at making it more difficult for unauthorized drivers to use disabled parking permits raises serious questions about privacy issues and medical records, civil rights advocates say. The law, set to go into effect Jan. 1, sets stricter conditions for issuing permits, including a requirement that a doctor certify "a full description of the illness or disability" in writing.
HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Requests by attorneys for Kobe Bryant seeking hospital medical records of the woman who accused him of sexual assault have raised questions about medical privacy and whether a new federal law provides sufficient protections. A sweeping federal law enacted in April was designed to prevent the release of medical information without first obtaining proper legal authority or the patient's consent.
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