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Disclosure Of Information

BUSINESS
November 9, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
TiVo Inc., the pioneer of digital video recorders, said Thursday that it planned to start selling information about subscribers' ages, incomes, ethnicity and viewing habits to advertisers. TiVo, which allows users to record television programs and fast-forward through commercials, is offering the data to help advertisers target specific consumers. The company said 20,000 households volunteered for the program, called Power Watch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2007 | Tony Barboza, Henry Weinstein and Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writers
UC Irvine gave Orange County billionaire Donald Bren the right to be consulted in the selection of a dean for its new law school in return for his $20-million donation, according to documents released to The Times on Thursday. The eight-page gift agreement reveals the scope of what Bren received for his money, ranging from major matters such as selection of the dean to specific rules governing how prominently signs featuring his name were to be displayed on the campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2007 | Richard Winton and Matt Lait, Times Staff Writers
Despite vowing to "provide greater transparency" on police shootings and other violent encounters, the Los Angeles Police Commission has failed to publicly release the details of nearly 200 confrontations involving LAPD officers. After inquiries Friday from The Times, the commission scrambled to post more reports on its website and said it expects to place new ones online as early as next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2007 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
If the state and federal governments get their way, night-flying planes will soon resume dousing the Monterey Peninsula with a moth-targeting pesticide, before they move on to other areas of Northern California. State regulators insist the chemical compound is safe. But they also insist they can't disclose much of what's in it. "Trade secrets," said Steve Lyle, spokesman for the state Department of Food and Agriculture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed a bill into law that allows district attorneys to continue to release information regarding a person's local criminal history. The law, signed Friday, allows prosecutors to release a person's name, physical description, arrest history, booking numbers and charges. Prosecutors had been releasing this information for years, until a legal opinion by the state attorney general's office held that they would have to discontinue doing so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2007 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from the politically robust hospital industry, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has rebuffed a legislative proposal that could help California catch up with other parts of the nation by allowing patients to learn the safety and surgical success rates of specific hospitals and doctors. Healthcare experts say that one of the most inexpensive and effective ways to encourage hospitals to improve patient care is to make their failures public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2007 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
A child molester suspected in the disappearance of a Rancho Santa Margarita college student was sentenced to three years in prison Wednesday for failing to register as a sex offender, as the missing woman's friends and relatives demanded his help in their search. "All our waking moments are focused only on finding our daughter and discovering what has happened to her," Reza Jou, father of 19-year-old Donna Jou, said on the steps of Los Angeles County Superior Court.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Corporations should better explain how they set pay for top managers and avoid repeating boilerplate sections, the Securities and Exchange Commission said in a report released Tuesday. The SEC, which is reviewing how well new executive-compensation disclosure rules are working, said companies should use simpler language that investors could understand and should focus more on why pay decisions were made.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
A congressional committee sent letters to three of the largest U.S. telephone companies asking about Bush administration efforts to spy on Americans' phone calls and Internet messages. The House Energy and Commerce Committee asked 25 questions of AT&T Inc., the largest U.S. telephone company; Verizon Communications Inc., the second biggest; and Qwest Communications International Inc., the fourth largest, according to letters posted on the panel's website.
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