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Discovision Associates

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BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines Corp. and MCA Inc. said Thursday that they have agreed to sell Discovision Associates, a one-time high-flyer in laser disc technology whose sole asset today is a large portfolio of patents, to Pioneer Electronics Corp. of Japan for $200 million. The Discovision patents cover a number of basic optical storage technologies that lie at the heart of compact disc players, video disc players and optical storage devices used for some computer applications.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 2000
Discovision Associates, an Irvine owner and manager of optical disc patents, said Wednesday that it has entered into a patent license agreement with a French company for the manufacture and sale of optical discs. Terms of the deal with SNA Compact Disc of France were not released. Discovision, with about 1,300 patents, is a partnership of Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc. and Pioneer Electronics Capital Inc.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 2000
Discovision Associates, an Irvine owner and manager of optical disc patents, said Wednesday that it has entered into a patent license agreement with a French company for the manufacture and sale of optical discs. Terms of the deal with SNA Compact Disc of France were not released. Discovision, with about 1,300 patents, is a partnership of Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc. and Pioneer Electronics Capital Inc.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1994 | JACK SEARLES
Technicolor Videocassette Inc., based in Camarillo, has vowed to defend itself "vigorously" against a patent-infringement lawsuit filed in connection with the firm's fast-growing compact-disc duplicating unit. The suit, filed by Discovision Associates, an Irvine-based subsidiary of Japan's giant Pioneer Electronic Corp., charges Technicolor with infringing on three of Discovision's U. S. patents in manufacturing and duplicating CDs and CD-ROMs.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Discovision Sues: Discovision Associates of Costa Mesa said Monday that it is suing a compact disc manufacturer for allegedly violating a patent held by Discovision related to optical disc manufacturing. DVA filed a suit Friday in federal court in Charlottesville, Va., against Nimbus Records Inc. Dennis Fischel, president of DVA, said in a statement that efforts to sell a license to Nimbus failed. DVA's patent covers the way digital data is encoded upon an optical disc, Fischel said.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1994 | JACK SEARLES
Technicolor Videocassette Inc., based in Camarillo, has vowed to defend itself "vigorously" against a patent-infringement lawsuit filed in connection with the firm's fast-growing compact-disc duplicating unit. The suit, filed by Discovision Associates, an Irvine-based subsidiary of Japan's giant Pioneer Electronic Corp., charges Technicolor with infringing on three of Discovision's U. S. patents in manufacturing and duplicating CDs and CD-ROMs.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department has launched an antitrust investigation into an arrangement between Sony Corp. and Philips Electronics that has helped the two consumer electronics companies dominate the compact disc business for more than a decade. The two companies agreed in the 1970s to cross-license each other's patents on CD technology, enabling them to jointly charge patent licensing fees to dozens of disc manufacturers.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department has launched an antitrust investigation into an arrangement between Sony Corp. and Philips Electronics that has helped the two consumer electronics companies dominate the compact disc business for more than a decade. The two companies agreed in the 1970s to cross-license each other's patents on CD technology, enabling them to jointly charge patent licensing fees to dozens of disc manufacturers.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Discovision Sues: Discovision Associates of Costa Mesa said Monday that it is suing a compact disc manufacturer for allegedly violating a patent held by Discovision related to optical disc manufacturing. DVA filed a suit Friday in federal court in Charlottesville, Va., against Nimbus Records Inc. Dennis Fischel, president of DVA, said in a statement that efforts to sell a license to Nimbus failed. DVA's patent covers the way digital data is encoded upon an optical disc, Fischel said.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines Corp. and MCA Inc. said Thursday that they have agreed to sell Discovision Associates, a one-time high-flier in laser disc technology whose sole asset today is a large portfolio of patents, to Pioneer Electronics Corp. of Japan for $200 million. The Discovision patents cover a number of basic optical storage technologies that lie at the heart of compact disc players, video disc players and optical storage devices used for some computer applications.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines Corp. and MCA Inc. said Thursday that they have agreed to sell Discovision Associates, a one-time high-flier in laser disc technology whose sole asset today is a large portfolio of patents, to Pioneer Electronics Corp. of Japan for $200 million. The Discovision patents cover a number of basic optical storage technologies that lie at the heart of compact disc players, video disc players and optical storage devices used for some computer applications.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines Corp. and MCA Inc. said Thursday that they have agreed to sell Discovision Associates, a one-time high-flyer in laser disc technology whose sole asset today is a large portfolio of patents, to Pioneer Electronics Corp. of Japan for $200 million. The Discovision patents cover a number of basic optical storage technologies that lie at the heart of compact disc players, video disc players and optical storage devices used for some computer applications.
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