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Discrimination

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BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Corona del Mar podiatrist is struggling to get his foot in the door at a prestigious medical building complex in Newport Beach, complaining that the landlord is discriminating against his profession. Ivar Roth, 36, describes himself as "very conservative" and said he fits right into the traditional Newport Beach physician community. "I follow the rules," he said. "I don't make trouble."
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Anky van Deursen
Question: I have lived in Silicon Valley my whole life. I am 70 years old and retired. I recently applied for housing at an apartment complex and asked the leasing agent what my chances were of getting an apartment. He told me they had received a lot of applications. When I asked if it was worth it to apply at all, he shrugged and said I was "up against some Google people. " I was outraged. Am I being discriminated against, since he implied that I did not stand a chance of being chosen over a person who works for Google?
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NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Michael McGough
A Roman Catholic girls high school in Glendora has fired a teacher after he married his male partner and photos of the wedding were published in a local newspaper. According to St. Lucy's Priory High School, Ken Bencomo, who had taught at the school for 17 years, had to go because “public displays of behavior that are directly contrary to church teachings are inconsistent with [the schools'] values.” Bencomo's lawyer said his client hopes to resolve the situation without legal action, but he hasn't ruled out filing a lawsuit.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Anky van Deursen
Question: I just took over the property management job for a 100-unit multistory apartment complex. The previous property manager let the tenants run wild here, and the owner has asked me to shape things up. There are children running all over the place at all hours of the day and night, breaking sprinklers, making noise, skateboarding on the railings, throwing rocks and breaking windows. I would like to establish some rules and regulations to help protect the property, ensure peace and quiet for all the residents, and protect the owner from liability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1997
Now that the U.S. is getting rid of affirmative action, i.e., discrimination favoring those who have been getting the short end of the stick for centuries, is it going to get rid of the Small Business Administration (discrimination favoring self-styled entrepreneurs), the tax break for mortgage interest (discrimination favoring homeowners) and the Veterans' Administration (discrimination favoring ex-soldiers)? I just thought I should ask. JAMES DEVINE Los Angeles
WORLD
February 28, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Fresh out of college and facing a mountain of debt, the 21-year-old woman was searching online for jobs when she hit upon a listing that sounded perfect: administrative assistant at a tutoring school in Beijing. She sent in her resume, then reread the ad and noticed that only men were asked to apply for the position. "I got no response, so I called and asked: If I'm qualified but I'm not male, will I still be considered? The woman who answered said if the ad says men only, it's men only," she recalled.
OPINION
December 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Marriage between members of the same sex, a once radical idea, is increasingly accepted even where it hasn't been enshrined in law. But a significant number of Americans continue to object to gay marriage as a matter of religious conviction. Should they be able to act on their beliefs by refusing to do business with gay couples? In the vast majority of cases, the answer must be no. The owners of restaurants, hotels and other public accommodations shouldn't be able to refuse to serve gay couples, married or not, any more than they should be able to deny service to interracial couples or those from different religions.
OPINION
June 5, 2008
Re "Voters will decide on gay marriage," June 3 I remember when California voters in 1964 passed an initiative to legalize racial discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled that to be unconstitutional, just as the courts have banned segregation and laws against mixed-race marriages. Some people railed against these court decisions, but they eventually got back to their own lives. Courts have often led the way in banning discrimination, but hopefully California voters will reject the discriminatory initiative targeting same-sex marriage.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2013 | By David Horsey
By gutting the Voting Rights Act, the U.S. Supreme Court got some of the facts right, but failed to recognize the reality of continuing discrimination against African American voters. What the court got inarguably correct was that times have changed since the signature act of the civil rights era was passed in 1965. In the Southern states and the other jurisdictions whose voting practices were put under authority of the federal government, black Americans are no longer blatantly barred from exercising their constitutional right to cast a ballot to choose their leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks ago, upon returning home from a Fourth of July weekend at the beach with his wife and daughter, actor Brad Davis pulled out a yellow legal pad and drafted a proposal for a book he never got the chance to write. "The purpose of this book is to reveal what it's like to be infected with HIV, to be receiving treatment, and having to remain anonymous at all costs--chronicling how I have done this for over six years," wrote Davis in spare and simple prose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Lee Romney
KING CITY, Calif. - Angel Pineda tucked his white cowboy hat under a folding chair in the packed church hall and listened. First came the civil rights presentation - on what to do if pulled over by police. " I want a lawyer ," American Civil Liberties Union staffer Daisy Vieyra, who had come from San Francisco, enunciated in English. "I want a lawyer," the crowd repeated. Then came the indignation, as local residents and advocates from outside this southern Salinas Valley agricultural community made it clear that tomorrow's King City will not be the same as yesterday's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
A federal jury has awarded $3.5 million to three Westminster police officers who said they are continually being passed over for promotions and assigned to “mall duty” because they are Latino. After deliberating for about three days, the Santa Ana jury returned a verdict Thursday, finding that officers Jose Flores, Ryan Reyes and Brian Perez should get damages for discrimination, said Melanie Poturica, an attorney representing the Orange County city. “In many ways this is a historic victory for officers of color,” said Victor Viramontes, an attorney representing the officers.
WORLD
February 28, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Fresh out of college and facing a mountain of debt, the 21-year-old woman was searching online for jobs when she hit upon a listing that sounded perfect: administrative assistant at a tutoring school in Beijing. She sent in her resume, then reread the ad and noticed that only men were asked to apply for the position. "I got no response, so I called and asked: If I'm qualified but I'm not male, will I still be considered? The woman who answered said if the ad says men only, it's men only," she recalled.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Delta Air Lines has denounced legislation that would permit businesses to cite religion in refusing to serve gays, saying  proposals in Georgia and Arizona would cause “significant harm” and “result in job losses.” The company, which is Atlanta's largest employer and one of the biggest private companies in Georgia, joins the likes of Apple, American Airlines and Marriott in opposing such measures. Arizonans  are awaiting  Gov. Jan Brewer's decision on whether to sign or veto legislation that would bolster business owners' rights to cite their religion as a defense in discrimination lawsuits.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - President Obama will seek to right a historical wrong next month when he awards two dozen veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam - including 17 Latinos - the Medal of Honor after a lengthy Pentagon review into racial and ethnic discrimination in the awarding of the nation's commendation for combat valor. Obama will present the medals to three Vietnam War veterans, and to family members of the 21 veterans who are receiving it posthumously, the White House said late Friday.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia -- Speaking to reporters just days before the 2014 Sochi Games, the top Olympic official said he is open to adding language to the Olympic charter that specifically addresses discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Thomas Bach, president of the International Olympic Committee, insisted on Monday that "we stand against any kind of discrimination for whatever reason. " Gay rights have become an issue at these Games because of a controversial Russian law that criminalizes "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations" in the presence of minors.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A recent study released by Harvard Business School professors says black hosts on Airbnb typically charge lower fees than non-black hosts for similar properties, signaling the black hosts may be facing discrimination through the online service. The study looked at Airbnb members with properties listed in New York City in 2012. On average, non-black hosts charged approximately 12% more than black hosts for similar rentals. Airbnb is a start-up that has risen in popularity for letting users rent spare rooms or vacation homes, among other things, from others for short stays.
WORLD
February 1, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
NEW DELHI - He was a slight young man, who sported hipster eyeglasses and a wispy moustache. He had dyed his spiky hair blond, but that wasn't the only thing that made college student Nido Tania stand out in the Indian capital. Tania was from northeastern India, a narrow strip of territory wedged between China and Myanmar, whose people say they face discrimination here for having “Asian” facial features. When Tania, 20, stopped in a dairy to ask for directions Tuesday afternoon, a shopkeeper's taunt about his hair color quickly escalated into a violent altercation in which several men thrashed him with sticks and steel rods, friends say. He died in his bed the next day, succumbing to severe injuries to the chest and brain, according to preliminary medical results provided to his family.
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