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NEWS
April 3, 1988
It is unfortunate that your staff writer emphasized the debate over "safe drinking" rather than the deeper issue addressed by Herbert Fingarette's work, that of personal responsibility versus victimization. We are fast becoming a society of powerless automatons determined by blind forces of heredity, biochemistry, and disease. People who are conditioned to believe they have no choice eventually stop making the effort to choose. The disease theory of behavioral disorders is a 20th-Century version of "The devil made me do it."
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NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1995
With reference to your article on March 10, " 'Flesh-Eating' Disease Kills Agoura Man," I feel that this is irresponsible journalism. Reporting the occurrence is one thing, but quoting Sandra Tyson, the attorney for the family of another patient who died of the disease, is totally inflammatory and serves no purpose. I feel Tyson should be sanctioned by the Ventura County Bar Assn. for commenting on a case of which she has no connection and knows no specific facts of the medical problems involved with same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Having been absent from the Legislature for nearly two weeks, State Assemblywoman Sharon Runner (R-Lancaster) said through a spokeswoman Friday that she has been diagnosed with a rare but manageable disease that affects her autoimmune system. Runner, best known as an author of the state law requiring tracking of sex offenders, has been diagnosed with limited scleroderma, which normally affects the skin, but in her case has also caused lung problems, said spokeswoman Kayla Garcia. As a result, when the 53-year-old lawmaker catches a cold, the effects on her breathing can be more severe.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Low-intensity walking may help people with Parkinson's disease improve their gait and mobility, a new study finds. The study, presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Honolulu, compared three different forms of exercise to see which was most beneficial to men and women with Parkinson's disease, which affects motor control. Researchers randomly assigned 67 people with the disease to one of three programs: a low-intensity treadmill walk for 50 minutes; a high-intensity treadmill walk for 30 minutes; and a weight and stretching regimen that included leg presses, extensions and curls.
NEWS
October 18, 2010
Doctors usually diagnose Alzheimer's disease through a combination of medical and cognitive tests along with a brain scan. New studies, even one involving family members and friends, offer the promise of making the diagnosis easier -- and maybe even earlier. An August study in the Archives of Neurology used biomarkers to correctly classify patients who had Alzheimer's disease. The study tested normal people without the disease, those with mild brain impairments and those with the disease.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men who don't have children may be at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, a study finds. The study, released Monday in the journal Human Reproduction , followed 137,903 male married or previously married AARP members for an average of about 10 years. At the beginning of the study, the participants, whose average age was about 63, had no history of heart disease, and 92% had fathered at least one child. Half had three or more children. During the course of the study, 3,082 men died due to cardiovascular causes.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A Boston researcher will receive a $1-million prize from the Prize4Life foundation's ALS Biomarker Challenge, an effort to develop new ways to monitor the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to make it easier to test potential drugs for the disease. The prize is believed to be the biggest-ever challenge award related to a medical condition, but Prize4Life estimates it could halve the cost of clinical trials for new ALS drugs. Dr. Seward Rutkove of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center will receive the award formally in June.
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