Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDisease
IN THE NEWS

Disease

NEWS
April 3, 1988
Learning how to drink is of no use to an alcoholic. Learning how to live is. To Fingarette, I have this to say: Please stop trying to help us, for in actuality, you are helping to kill us, and we can do that well enough on our own. ROBIN S. HECKLE Los Angeles
Advertisement
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Having been absent from the Legislature for nearly two weeks, State Assemblywoman Sharon Runner (R-Lancaster) said through a spokeswoman Friday that she has been diagnosed with a rare but manageable disease that affects her autoimmune system. Runner, best known as an author of the state law requiring tracking of sex offenders, has been diagnosed with limited scleroderma, which normally affects the skin, but in her case has also caused lung problems, said spokeswoman Kayla Garcia. As a result, when the 53-year-old lawmaker catches a cold, the effects on her breathing can be more severe.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Low-intensity walking may help people with Parkinson's disease improve their gait and mobility, a new study finds. The study, presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting in Honolulu, compared three different forms of exercise to see which was most beneficial to men and women with Parkinson's disease, which affects motor control. Researchers randomly assigned 67 people with the disease to one of three programs: a low-intensity treadmill walk for 50 minutes; a high-intensity treadmill walk for 30 minutes; and a weight and stretching regimen that included leg presses, extensions and curls.
NEWS
October 18, 2010
Doctors usually diagnose Alzheimer's disease through a combination of medical and cognitive tests along with a brain scan. New studies, even one involving family members and friends, offer the promise of making the diagnosis easier -- and maybe even earlier. An August study in the Archives of Neurology used biomarkers to correctly classify patients who had Alzheimer's disease. The study tested normal people without the disease, those with mild brain impairments and those with the disease.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men who don't have children may be at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, a study finds. The study, released Monday in the journal Human Reproduction , followed 137,903 male married or previously married AARP members for an average of about 10 years. At the beginning of the study, the participants, whose average age was about 63, had no history of heart disease, and 92% had fathered at least one child. Half had three or more children. During the course of the study, 3,082 men died due to cardiovascular causes.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Alzheimer's disease threatens more and more people in the United States as the population ages. Anyone concerned about himself or herself or a loved one can get a free memory screen Tuesday at one of more than 2,300 locations across the nation (Tuesday is the Alzheimer's Foundation of America's National Memory Screening Day).   The five-minute screenings -- which are to be available at doctors' offices, hospitals, senior centers and K-Mart pharmacies, among other locations -- are confidential.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A Boston researcher will receive a $1-million prize from the Prize4Life foundation's ALS Biomarker Challenge, an effort to develop new ways to monitor the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to make it easier to test potential drugs for the disease. The prize is believed to be the biggest-ever challenge award related to a medical condition, but Prize4Life estimates it could halve the cost of clinical trials for new ALS drugs. Dr. Seward Rutkove of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center will receive the award formally in June.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
There are lots of ways to raise awareness about a disease -- and having Hollywood celebrities tell their stories always helps. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has gathered a number of notables, many of whom have a personal connection to the disease, for its first hourlong TV telethon on Saturday night. The Together for Care Telethon will feature, among others, actor Hector Elizondo, the foundation's honorary chairman, who has spoken openly lately about his own family's reluctance to seek help when his mother showed signs of Alzheimer's back in the mid-1960s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|