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NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men who don't have children may be at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, a study finds. The study, released Monday in the journal Human Reproduction , followed 137,903 male married or previously married AARP members for an average of about 10 years. At the beginning of the study, the participants, whose average age was about 63, had no history of heart disease, and 92% had fathered at least one child. Half had three or more children. During the course of the study, 3,082 men died due to cardiovascular causes.
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SCIENCE
April 1, 2014 | Mary MacVean
Not that most people are eating even five servings of fruit and vegetables every day - but that might not be enough to get the best protection from disease and early death, said researchers who also found that vegetables do more good than fruit. Might the new call be at least seven a day? And if the fruit came from a can or the freezer, it might be doing more harm than good, the researchers reported in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health . “We found a strong inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality,” they wrote.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
There are lots of ways to raise awareness about a disease -- and having Hollywood celebrities tell their stories always helps. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has gathered a number of notables, many of whom have a personal connection to the disease, for its first hourlong TV telethon on Saturday night. The Together for Care Telethon will feature, among others, actor Hector Elizondo, the foundation's honorary chairman, who has spoken openly lately about his own family's reluctance to seek help when his mother showed signs of Alzheimer's back in the mid-1960s.
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Walking may put the brakes on cognitive decline in healthy older people as well as those with cognitive impairment, a new study finds. The ongoing study, which spans 20 years, also quantified how much walking is necessary to keep brain volume up. Researchers followed 426 older adults for a number of years to see if there were changes in brain volume. Among the participants 299 were healthy, and 127 had cognitive impairments, including 83 with mild cognitive impairment, and 44 with Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Alzheimer's disease threatens more and more people in the United States as the population ages. Anyone concerned about himself or herself or a loved one can get a free memory screen Tuesday at one of more than 2,300 locations across the nation (Tuesday is the Alzheimer's Foundation of America's National Memory Screening Day).   The five-minute screenings -- which are to be available at doctors' offices, hospitals, senior centers and K-Mart pharmacies, among other locations -- are confidential.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
If you have diabetes, it may help to buddy up, a new study suggests. Peer support may help control the disease that accounts for an increasing number of hospitalizations. The study published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine paired up diabetic patients who had high blood sugar levels despite being on a treatment path. The six-month study found that participants benefited from meeting with a peer or peers in a group setting who reminded them to take medications, follow a diet and continue other lifestyle changes that are critical to controlling diabetes.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
For seniors and their families, Alzheimer's disease and its hefty price tag are an increasingly scary prospect. About 5.4 million Americans are affected by Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Because of growing life expectancies and aging baby boomers, that number is expected to triple by 2050. Alayna Tillman's mother and aunt both have Alzheimer's disease and live with Tillman, her husband and two sons in Lake View Terrace. Tillman says Medicare pays for many of the medical costs her mom and aunt incur.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In the third gene-therapy success of recent weeks, French researchers have arrested the progression of the rare and fatal degenerative disorder adrenoleukodystrophy, which was at the heart of the popular movie "Lorenzo's Oil." The disease has stabilized in two boys who were 7 years old when the therapy was performed two years ago, the team reported today in the journal Science. "This is a disease that never, ever stabilizes" on its own, said Dr. Katherine High of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, who was not involved in the research.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Germs and detectives might not seem like they're connected. But their link, as a certain fictitious sleuth might say, is elementary. In Thomas Goetz's fascinating and entertaining new page turner of a book, "The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis," we are transported to the final decades of the 19th century. The age of electricity was dawning. And in laboratories and on imaginary London streets, men armed with microscopes and the power of observation first used science to tackle the twin scourges of crime and disease.
OPINION
September 29, 1985
I applaud Money's letter, saying alcoholism is the ultimate effect of a series of purposive decisions, not a disease. To say alcoholism is a disease is like saying overeating is a disease that the individual is powerless to control. What happened to the idea that people ought to control their impulses? It's time we return to self-discipline. FRANK P. BURTON Santa Monica
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