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NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Duct tape – is there no end to its usefulness? Apparently not. Now we learn that using duct tape in hospitals could be a tool in the fight against infectious disease. Call it a handyman’s quarantine. An infection-prevention team at Trinity Medical Center in the Quad Cities along the Illinois and Iowa border, wanted to create safe zones in which healthcare workers could talk to patients with infectious diseases. So they used 3-foot squares of red duct tape to indicate where precisely that zone was located.
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NEWS
April 3, 1988
Learning how to drink is of no use to an alcoholic. Learning how to live is. To Fingarette, I have this to say: Please stop trying to help us, for in actuality, you are helping to kill us, and we can do that well enough on our own. ROBIN S. HECKLE Los Angeles
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Walking may put the brakes on cognitive decline in healthy older people as well as those with cognitive impairment, a new study finds. The ongoing study, which spans 20 years, also quantified how much walking is necessary to keep brain volume up. Researchers followed 426 older adults for a number of years to see if there were changes in brain volume. Among the participants 299 were healthy, and 127 had cognitive impairments, including 83 with mild cognitive impairment, and 44 with Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Asserting "we are at an exceptional moment" in the hunt for an Alzheimer'sdiseasetreatment, National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins on Tuesday promised a raft of new research aimed at stopping and reversing the memory-robbing disorder by the year 2025. In unveiling a first-ever "national strategy" on Alzheimer's disease, Collins launched several new projects and clinical trials--including a whole-genome sequencing effort to identify genes that confer vulnerability to--or protection against-- Alzheimer's, and a trial to explore whether an inhaled form of insulin will slow progression of the disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Having been absent from the Legislature for nearly two weeks, State Assemblywoman Sharon Runner (R-Lancaster) said through a spokeswoman Friday that she has been diagnosed with a rare but manageable disease that affects her autoimmune system. Runner, best known as an author of the state law requiring tracking of sex offenders, has been diagnosed with limited scleroderma, which normally affects the skin, but in her case has also caused lung problems, said spokeswoman Kayla Garcia. As a result, when the 53-year-old lawmaker catches a cold, the effects on her breathing can be more severe.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
If you have diabetes, it may help to buddy up, a new study suggests. Peer support may help control the disease that accounts for an increasing number of hospitalizations. The study published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine paired up diabetic patients who had high blood sugar levels despite being on a treatment path. The six-month study found that participants benefited from meeting with a peer or peers in a group setting who reminded them to take medications, follow a diet and continue other lifestyle changes that are critical to controlling diabetes.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
For seniors and their families, Alzheimer's disease and its hefty price tag are an increasingly scary prospect. About 5.4 million Americans are affected by Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Because of growing life expectancies and aging baby boomers, that number is expected to triple by 2050. Alayna Tillman's mother and aunt both have Alzheimer's disease and live with Tillman, her husband and two sons in Lake View Terrace. Tillman says Medicare pays for many of the medical costs her mom and aunt incur.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In the third gene-therapy success of recent weeks, French researchers have arrested the progression of the rare and fatal degenerative disorder adrenoleukodystrophy, which was at the heart of the popular movie "Lorenzo's Oil." The disease has stabilized in two boys who were 7 years old when the therapy was performed two years ago, the team reported today in the journal Science. "This is a disease that never, ever stabilizes" on its own, said Dr. Katherine High of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, who was not involved in the research.
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