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NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A Boston researcher will receive a $1-million prize from the Prize4Life foundation's ALS Biomarker Challenge, an effort to develop new ways to monitor the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to make it easier to test potential drugs for the disease. The prize is believed to be the biggest-ever challenge award related to a medical condition, but Prize4Life estimates it could halve the cost of clinical trials for new ALS drugs. Dr. Seward Rutkove of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center will receive the award formally in June.
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NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
There are lots of ways to raise awareness about a disease -- and having Hollywood celebrities tell their stories always helps. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has gathered a number of notables, many of whom have a personal connection to the disease, for its first hourlong TV telethon on Saturday night. The Together for Care Telethon will feature, among others, actor Hector Elizondo, the foundation's honorary chairman, who has spoken openly lately about his own family's reluctance to seek help when his mother showed signs of Alzheimer's back in the mid-1960s.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Asserting "we are at an exceptional moment" in the hunt for an Alzheimer'sdiseasetreatment, National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins on Tuesday promised a raft of new research aimed at stopping and reversing the memory-robbing disorder by the year 2025. In unveiling a first-ever "national strategy" on Alzheimer's disease, Collins launched several new projects and clinical trials--including a whole-genome sequencing effort to identify genes that confer vulnerability to--or protection against-- Alzheimer's, and a trial to explore whether an inhaled form of insulin will slow progression of the disease.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In the world of “promising” multiple sclerosis drugs, it’s been quite a week. Two more experimental drugs -- both in pill form, not injected -- are joining the race of new treatments to slow the disease.  A study of multiple sclerosis patients who took the drug laquinimod over two years had 23% fewer relapses -- an attack of new symptoms or worsening of old ones -- compared with patients who took a sugar pill. The group that received the drug also had a 36% reduction in disability progression and a 33% reduction in brain atrophy.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
If you have diabetes, it may help to buddy up, a new study suggests. Peer support may help control the disease that accounts for an increasing number of hospitalizations. The study published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine paired up diabetic patients who had high blood sugar levels despite being on a treatment path. The six-month study found that participants benefited from meeting with a peer or peers in a group setting who reminded them to take medications, follow a diet and continue other lifestyle changes that are critical to controlling diabetes.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Duct tape – is there no end to its usefulness? Apparently not. Now we learn that using duct tape in hospitals could be a tool in the fight against infectious disease. Call it a handyman’s quarantine. An infection-prevention team at Trinity Medical Center in the Quad Cities along the Illinois and Iowa border, wanted to create safe zones in which healthcare workers could talk to patients with infectious diseases. So they used 3-foot squares of red duct tape to indicate where precisely that zone was located.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In the third gene-therapy success of recent weeks, French researchers have arrested the progression of the rare and fatal degenerative disorder adrenoleukodystrophy, which was at the heart of the popular movie "Lorenzo's Oil." The disease has stabilized in two boys who were 7 years old when the therapy was performed two years ago, the team reported today in the journal Science. "This is a disease that never, ever stabilizes" on its own, said Dr. Katherine High of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, who was not involved in the research.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Germs and detectives might not seem like they're connected. But their link, as a certain fictitious sleuth might say, is elementary. In Thomas Goetz's fascinating and entertaining new page turner of a book, "The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis," we are transported to the final decades of the 19th century. The age of electricity was dawning. And in laboratories and on imaginary London streets, men armed with microscopes and the power of observation first used science to tackle the twin scourges of crime and disease.
OPINION
September 29, 1985
I applaud Money's letter, saying alcoholism is the ultimate effect of a series of purposive decisions, not a disease. To say alcoholism is a disease is like saying overeating is a disease that the individual is powerless to control. What happened to the idea that people ought to control their impulses? It's time we return to self-discipline. FRANK P. BURTON Santa Monica
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