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SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Depression can look very different in men and women. And many of its hallmarks - rage, risk-taking, substance abuse and even workaholism - can hide in plain sight. Now researchers say that when these symptoms are factored into a diagnosis, the long-standing disparity between depression rates in men and women disappears. That conclusion overturns long-accepted statistics indicating that, over their lifetimes, women are 70% more likely to have major depression than men. In fact, when its symptoms are properly recognized in men, major depression may be even more common in men than in women, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal JAMA Psychiatry.
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SCIENCE
August 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A two-step process that begins by looking for a sudden change in a cancer marker may hold the key to detecting ovarian cancer earlier in its development, when this often-lethal cancer is easier to treat successfully, says a new study published in the journal Cancer. The study used a growing body of research on ovarian cancer to devise a strategy to identify women who need more intensive monitoring and not raise alarms or increase invasive surgery among women who are not likely to have developed the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Linda Ronstadt, who recently went public with her diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, will appear in Los Angeles next month to talk about her upcoming memoir. Parkinson's has taken away her ability to sing, but she still plans to talk about her book, "Simple Dreams. " Ronstadt will appear at the literary speakers series Writers Bloc in conversation with Patt Morrison. Tickets to the event, which will be held Sept. 24 in Santa Monica, are $25. "Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir" includes her personal history, stories of her loves and friendships, and the stories behind some of her songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Linda Ronstadt has disclosed that she is suffering from Parkinson's disease , and that the neurological disorder has left her unable to sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an  AARP Magazine interview  posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Singer Linda Ronstadt says she has Parkinson's disease and can no longer sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an AARP Magazine interview posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said. “No matter how hard you try.” Ronstadt said that she uses poles to help walk and uses a wheelchair when traveling.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Karin Klein
What if ticks were an endangered species? Would we preserve critical habitat for them? Fund a captive-tick breeding program? It would be hard for me, as a hiker and dog owner, to summon any sympathy for these disgusting little pests. If they were gone, would the greater environment miss them in any way? Just a fantasy. Ticks are, of course, thriving and a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control finds that they are, in fact, responsible for 10 times more Lyme disease than previously thought - 300,000 cases a year nationwide.
SCIENCE
August 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
New research finds that copper in amounts readily found in our drinking water, the foods we eat and the vitamin supplements we take likely plays a key role in initiating and fueling the abnormal protein build-up and brain inflammation that are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. While the mineral is important to healthy nerve conduction, hormone secretion and the growth of bones and connective tissue, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggested that too much of it may be a bad thing, and they set about to explore copper's dark side.
SCIENCE
August 13, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
If you're a middle-aged guy who watches sports, news or late-night talk shows, you've seen the ads: Your flagging energy levels, mood, sports prowess and libido ... could they be caused by low T? After you figure out that T stands for "testosterone" -- a magically powerful male hormone the shortage of which you would never want to admit to -- you say to yourself, "Oh my God, maybe it is low T!" And if you then go to the website mentioned in the ads and take a quiz, you'll quickly learn that there is a treatment for low T, one that you can ask your doctor about.
SPORTS
August 12, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Florida State freshman Jameis Winston says he's a lot like Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. That could be good or bad news for Seminoles fans, depending on how they look at it. Who wouldn't want the guy who could very well end up being their starting quarterback this season to emulate last year's Heisman Trophy winner on the field? But would those same fans really want their potential new quarterback to imitate Manziel's off-field antics? Not that "Johnny Football" has gotten into any trouble with the law, but his controversial tweets, supposed hard-partying ways and possible NCAA violations have kept him in the headlines most of the off-season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Too often when veteran artists revisit career-defining hits late in life it's more of a marketing move than an artistic exploration. Not in this case. Since revealing two years ago that he's been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the singer-guitarist and former TV show host released his well-received "Ghost on the Canvas" album and went on the road one last time for a farewell tour. Recently his family revealed that his disease has progressed to the point where he can no longer perform.
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