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September 4, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of the BP oil spill, gaping questions remain about a key tool used during cleanup: the nearly 2 million gallons of chemical dispersants sprayed over the water or onto the gushing wellhead on the seafloor. Do the chemicals help recovery, hinder it — or neither? Just as dishwashing detergent breaks grease on dirty plates into bits, dispersants help turn a slick of oil into droplets a hair's breadth in size. In droplet form, oil is more easily pulled under by currents, away from birds, otters, seaweed and other marine life near the surface.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Angel Jennings and Marisa Gerber
Fullerton police issued a dispersal order Saturday evening after several protesters in a rally demanding justice for Kelly Thomas allegedly turned violent and attacked a reporter. A reporter who was covering the demonstration for CBS-2 was struck by a female protester, according to the news station. The reporter sought shelter in the news van as several people surrounded the vehicle. At least three protesters were arrested earlier in the day, including two for vandalism, according to Sgt. Jeff Stuart.  None were Fullerton residents, he said.
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NATIONAL
May 23, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt and Carolyn Cole, Los Angeles Times
BP has rebuffed demands from government officials and environmentalists to use a less-toxic dispersant to break up the oil from its massive offshore spill, saying that the chemical product it is now using continues to be "the best option for subsea application." On Thursday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency gave the London-based company 72 hours to replace the dispersant Corexit 9500 or to describe in detail why other dispersants fail to meet environmental standards. The agency on Saturday released a 12-page document from BP, representing only a portion of the company's full response.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - In a showdown that could spark a fresh wave of violence, the Egyptian government announced Wednesday that security forces were preparing to disperse sit-ins by thousands of Islamist supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsi. The decision signals a likely crackdown by the military-backed government against pro-Morsi demonstrators outside Rabaa Al Adawiya mosque and around Cairo University. Clashes in those areas have killed nearly 200 people since Morsi and the political wing of his Muslim Brotherhood movement were overthrown in a coup July 3.   “Based on the tremendous popular support the people have given the state to deal with terrorism and violence … the Cabinet has decided to begin taking all necessary procedures to face those threats,” the government said in a statement.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Julie Cart and Bettina Boxall
In a sign of diminished confidence in BP's ability to manage the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, federal officials Monday said they intended to require the company to dramatically scale back its use of oil dispersants and would initiate their own tests on the chemicals' effect on sea life. With an oil spill of epic proportions looming offshore, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson — along with angry chorus of lawmakers — chided BP for its lack of transparency.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Alana Semuels and Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The oil swirling in the Gulf of Mexico — broken up by dispersants and churned by winds and currents — has become an elusive giant, increasingly difficult to clean up but presenting a smaller, scattered threat if it reaches shore, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Thad Allen said Friday. "This spill is changing in its character," said Allen, President Obama's top commander in charge of responding to the spill. "I don't believe any longer that we have a large monolithic spill."
BUSINESS
October 29, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Recent chemical tests have shown no widespread contamination to seafood from dispersants used to break up oil from the BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico ? and that such food is safe for the public to eat. Officials from the federal Food and Drug Administration and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported Friday that less than 1% of 1,735 seafood tissue samples tested came up positive for any trace chemicals. Those samples that tested positive contained levels of contaminants well below the safety threshold of 100 parts per million for fish and 500 parts per million for shrimp, crabs and oysters, federal officials said.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
High winds Monday threatened to sweep down on Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska, complicating the task of workers struggling to hold back a black tide from the nation's largest oil spill. Winds of 20 knots were predicted for the sound and along the north gulf coast late Monday, which could push the slick closer to the pristine Kenai Fjords National Park. But while the storm threatened to undo much of the gains made during cleanup operations since the spill from the Exxon Valdez on March 24, it appeared that the oil slick was beginning to break up in the Gulf of Alaska--good news for Kodiak Island, one of the nation's most productive fisheries.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Here on the open ocean, 12 miles from ground zero of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the gulf is hovering between life and death. The large strands of sargassum seaweed atop the ocean are normally noisy with birds and thick with crustaceans, small fish and sea turtles. But now this is a silent panorama, heavy with the smell of oil. There are no birds. The seaweed is soaked in rust-colored crude and chemical dispersant. It is devoid of life except for the occasional juvenile sea turtle, speckled with oil and clinging to the only habitat it knows.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2010 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
The sun was shining, the waves were inviting, and the sand was soft, but Cassie Cox gazed forlornly Saturday at row upon row of unrented, still-furled beach umbrellas on what is usually the busiest holiday weekend of the year. "This is the saddest thing I've ever seen," said Cox, who had rented only a dozen umbrellas to beachgoers all morning. "Last year at this time, we had more than 1,000 people here." Long known as a jewel of the Gulf Islands National Seashore, this three-mile barrier island was pristine until three days ago. Now, oily ribbons, tarlike pellets and sludge patties are spoiling the sugar-sand beach, marking another victim of the BP oil spill.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - In a showdown that could spark a fresh wave of violence, the Egyptian government announced Wednesday that security forces were preparing to disperse sit-ins by thousands of Islamist supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsi. The decision signals a likely crackdown by the military-backed government against pro-Morsi demonstrators outside Rabaa al Adawiya mosque and around Cairo University. Clashes in those areas have killed nearly 200 people since Morsi and the political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood movement were overthrown in a coup July 3. "Based on the tremendous popular support the people have given the state to deal with terrorism and violence … the Cabinet has decided to begin taking all necessary procedures to face those threats," the government said in a statement.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Environmentalists won a big victory for marine animals this week, with a court ruling that requires the government to determine whether dispersants used to to break up oil spills are harmful to endangered species before the chemicals are used in federal waters off California. The settlement in District Court in San Francisco requires the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard to analyze the impacts of dispersant products, which are used to diffuse oil spills into small droplets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Robert J. Lopez
A camp ranger, carjacked in Big Bear by Christopher Dorner and who then called police, is expected to ask a judge Friday to block the release of $1 million in reward money. Richard Heltebrake, who unsuccessfully sought the reward, contends he deserves it. He is expected to show up in a downtown L.A. courtroom Friday to ask an L.A. County Superior Court judge to grant a temporary restraining order stopping authorities from disbursing the money. Heltebrake called 911 after he was carjacked in the Big Bear area Feb. 12 by Dorner, who took off in Heltebrake's white pickup.
SCIENCE
March 1, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
A pair of NASA probes has discovered a previously unknown ring of radiation blanketing the Earth, upending a long-standing scientific theory about how charged particles coalesce around the planet, scientists reported Thursday. Just four days after the twin Radiation Belt Storm Probes were launched in August, NASA scientists looked on in amazement as instruments revealed a third belt of high-energy particles between the planet's inner and outer radiation belts, known as the Van Allen belts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2013 | Dan Weikel
A report prepared for Los Angeles County's top administrator claims the operators of LAX have virtually ignored legal requirements to reduce effects on the environment by dispersing growth in commercial flights to other airports in the region. A 2006 court settlement in a series of lawsuits over expansion plans at Los Angeles International Airport ordered Los Angeles World Airports to begin regionalizing airline traffic. But William T Fujioka, the chief executive for Los Angeles County, and a consultant's report prepared for his office asserts that the city airport department has made only "token efforts" to comply with provisions of the settlement that seek a wider distribution of flights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
A protest that led to a pepper-spraying incident outside a Santa Monica College Board of Trustees meeting in April was exacerbated by inadequate planning by campus police and "inappropriate" pushing and grabbing by some student demonstrators, according to an independent review released Friday. The report found that although most campus officers acted with restraint, the use of pepper spray and a raised baton by one did not comply with policy. The melee unfolded at the April 3 meeting after about 100 students gathered to protest a proposed two-tier fee plan that would have charged more for high-demand courses.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | United Press International
A wedge-shaped oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico was being dispersed Sunday as it moved slowly west from the site of an extinguished Mexican oil well fire that had burned for a week, Coast Guard officials said. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | United Press International
Police fired rubber bullets and tossed smoke bombs to disperse striking workers who rampaged through downtown Oveido to protest layoffs at state-run steel mills and mines in northern Spain, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
The day before Thanksgiving is one of the busiest days of the year for Los Angeles International Airport, and union organizers knew it would likely send a message if they could snarl traffic by marching through the streets and clogging a heavily used intersection near LAX. So while travelers hurried to their terminals Wednesday afternoon, about 1,500 protesters carrying signs that read "Living Wage & Affordable Health Care" and chanting "Respect, respect,...
NATIONAL
September 21, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Kenneth Feinberg, who oversaw victim compensation funds after the Virginia Tech shootings, the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and to those connected to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, is being asked to become involved in the money collected after a shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. The shooting prompted more than $5 million in donations. Feinberg, who was hired this week to deal with compensation claims stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal at Penn State, will meet on Friday with Colorado state and charity officials to discuss a role in resolving disputes, it was reported by a variety of media outlets.
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