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WORLD
February 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Cuba will free seven of 59 dissidents imprisoned since 2003, a move that opponents of ailing Cuban leader Fidel Castro said reflects a "climate of change" under his brother's rule. The releases were negotiated by Spain and announced by Spanish Foreign Minister Miguel Angel Moratinos. The Spanish newspaper El Pais reported on its website that four of the released dissidents will be sent to Spain with their families to receive medical treatment. They are Omar Pernet, Jose Gabriel Ramon Castillo, Alejandro Gonzalez and Pedro Pablo Alvarez.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
ALEPPO, Syria - In the newly opened office of the Islamist Liberation Party, the chairs were still covered with plastic and the walls were bare except for three Islamic black and white flags hanging behind Hisham Baba, the party's spokesman. Political pamphlets fresh from the printer had yet to be folded. On that day, during which Baba prepared political and religious presentations on his laptop, more than two dozen people were killed in and around Aleppo. Even as the Syrian civil war rages on in its third year with dim prospects for a resolution, Islamist, secular, nationalist and other groups in rebel-controlled areas are jockeying to present themselves as the best alternative to the government of President Bashar Assad.
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WORLD
December 7, 2004 | From Reuters
Cuba's Communist government freed an independent journalist Monday, the 14th member of a group of 75 jailed dissidents released on medical grounds as Havana seeks to repair relations with the European Union. Jorge Olivera Castillo, 43, was freed after serving 20 months of an 18-year prison sentence on charges of conspiring with the United States against Cuba. He said he was suffering from chronic colitis and hypertension.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Ai Weiwei will join the jury of the annual Stockholm Film Festival, although it's questionable if the Chinese dissident artist will be able to attend. The panel, mostly composed of film industry professionals, each year reserves one seat for an artist outside of film, which Ai will fill, organizers announced Monday. Festival director Git Scheynius said the artist was chosen for the panel to symbolize the repression of artists and journalists. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times The political activist is hard to reach: He is without Internet access and his travel outside of China is prohibited, according to reports.
WORLD
December 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese police briefly detained liberal author Yu Jie, democracy activist Liu Xiaobo and former Communist Youth League official Zhang Zuhua, friends and family members said, in what appeared to be part of an intensified government crackdown on intellectuals. Yu, 31, is an essayist who once called on the Communist Party to remove Mao Tse-tung's embalmed body from public display, and Liu, 49, is a well-known writer who has been jailed three times for criticizing the party.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
What an unintentionally ironic placement of the two articles on the front page of Westside: "The Making of a Dissident" celebrates the bravery of Wang Chao-hua for her pro-democracy actions in China. Right below her is the headline "Yellow Ribbons Knot for Him," a story on the shameful treatment of Steve Raikin, who declined to drape his house in yellow ribbons and preferred a peace poster instead. Apparently some Americans patriotically endorse the American values of dissidence, independence, and democracy, as long as they occur in some other country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1987 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
The board of directors of the elite California Club has sent a letter to its members calling on them not to support a group within the club that is seeking to circumvent a Los Angeles ordinance banning discriminatory membership policies toward women and minorities. In a letter to the club's 1,275 regular members and more than 300 non-resident members, the directors labeled the 41 members who have proposed evading the ordinance a "small dissenting group."
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | Associated Press
About 15 members of an outlawed Polish peace and ecology movement were released from police custody hours after they were detained, a member of the group said Wednesday. Five demonstrators picked up by police in Krakow and about 10 protesters detained in Wroclaw were released Tuesday night without charges, said Jacek Czaputowicz, a founder of the Freedom and Peace Movement. The Krakow demonstrators picketed outside a local court to protest their upcoming trial on charges stemming from a Feb.
WORLD
August 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A Chinese court jailed a dissident writer for four years on subversion charges for posting anti-government articles on the Internet, his disbarred lawyer said. The Intermediate People's Court in Hangzhou, capital of the eastern coastal province of Zhejiang, convicted Chen Shuqing of "inciting to subvert state power," Li Jianqiang said. "He was only expressing his political views.
WORLD
July 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Relatives and a Cuban human rights group called for an investigation into how a government critic died while in police custody last month. Manuel Acosta, a 47-year-old former boxer and member of a dissident group known as the Democracy Movement, was arrested June 21 in Aguada de Pasajeros on charges of "criminality," according to a letter signed by his cousin, Pedro Larena.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Robin Wright
There was big news out of Iran on Wednesday: It freed heroic human rights activist Nasrin Sotoudeh, a lawyer whose crime was defending dissidents. She had been serving a six-year sentence, down from 11 years. But almost everything Iran does is part of a bigger story. The release of Sotoudeh and almost a dozen other political prisoners (mostly female) can be read four ways. First, it may be a hopeful hint that Iran understands the costs, both at home and in the world's eyes, of its egregious crackdowns in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By J. Hoberman
A red Rose grows in Brooklyn, marries German refugee Albert (from a once-wealthy family but also a gung-ho Jewish communist like herself), and after some debate (a specialty), moves with him to the planned community of Sunnyside Gardens, Queens. There in this imagined socialist utopia, Rose Angrush Zimmer gives birth to daughter Miriam, who at the dawn of the '60s, will herself rebel. This, grossly simplified, is the tale of "Dissident Gardens," Jonathan Lethem's rich, grotesque and tender family saga, the latest, most pungent of his accounts of growing up absurd in New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By James Rainey
Members of a large Los Angeles-based union local that has been torn by internal strife have reelected their leaders in a closely watched election that included accusations that the organization was beset by fraud, racketeering and intimidation tactics. Challengers said they had hoped to strike a blow against national leaders of the International Union of Operating Engineers, who the dissidents alleged had nurtured a culture of corruption. The contest, which included two competing slates of dissidents, was widely followed in labor circles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2013 | By James Rainey
The 380,000-member International Union of Operating Engineers likes to tout a history stretching back to the 1890s of bringing skilled labor to construction projects and the operations of large buildings across the nation. But a group of dissident members from the southern reaches of California and Nevada say that proud record has been tainted by union bosses they allege have engaged in embezzlement, kickbacks and intimidation. The insurgents are members of two of the union's biggest units, Locals 12 and 501, which represent a total of nearly 30,000 workers.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The relationship between New York University and Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng--whose flight from his homeland last year came amid a major diplomatic tangle--has soured as the university denies claims it is evicting Chen from his campus apartment. Chen, a blind, self-trained lawyer who arrived in New York amid a blaze of publicity in May 2012, said in a statement released early Monday that pressure from the Chinese government had led the university to tell him he has until July to find another place to live.
WORLD
June 16, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Chen Guangcheng, the blind Chinese dissident, is charging that New York University is kicking him out of a fellowship because of pressure from the Chinese government. The self-trained lawyer, who set off an international incident last year by taking refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, said the university asked him and his wife and two children to leave in July. "As early as last August and September, the Chinese Communists had already begun to apply great, unrelenting pressure on New York University," Chen said in a statement released early Monday.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has ended a nine-day roadside confrontation with military authorities and returned to Yangon, the capital, an official source said today. It was not immediately clear why or how the standoff, which began Aug. 24, had ended, the Reuters news agency reported. Nobel Peace laureate Suu Kyi, her driver and 14 members of her National League for Democracy party were stopped by police as they headed out of Yangon and refused to heed government requests to return home.
WORLD
June 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Iran's theocratic judiciary has revoked the death sentence of dissident academic Hashem Aghajari, a penalty that sparked mass student protests in 2002, judicial officials said. Aghajari was convicted of blasphemy for a speech in which he said Muslims were not "monkeys" who should blindly follow the teachings of senior clerics. His comments were deemed by some to be a challenge to Iran's clerical establishment, and analysts saw the case as a test of the limits of free speech in the country.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Myanmar President Thein Sein released some 20 political prisoners Friday, days before a historic summit with President Obama in Washington early next week, according to officials and prisoner rights groups. The ex-general's government denied that the releases were linked to the visit, and activist groups said the nation's leadership had not gone far enough. But the release follows last month's pardon of dozens of political prisoners - one day after the European Union agreed to end most economic sanctions against the former pariah state.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI --  Some 20 political prisoners were released in Myanmar on Friday, just days before a a historic summit between the country's leader and President Obama in Washington, officials and prisoner rights groups said. President Thein Sein will be the first leader of Myanmar to visit Washington since 1966. In November, Obama became the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar . Zaw Htay, a senior official in Thein Sein's office, said on social media that the prisoner release was not timed to next week's visit but instead showed that the president was determined to offer an “inclusive political process.
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