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Dissidents Burma

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NEWS
August 2, 1988
Burma's new government vowed to prosecute a leading critic, a journalist and eight others arrested last week in a sweep apparently aimed at quashing opposition to President Sein Lwin. The official News Agency of Burma said that dissident Aung Gyi, 70, six retired senior military officers and three civilians were arrested as "a preventive measure to protect the state."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1988 | From Reuters
Burma announced Tuesday that, in the wake of anti-government rioting in which hundreds were arrested, all courts will be closed until April. The military council that seized power Sept. 18 brutally crushed dissent, abolished the old ruling party and judiciary and has attempted to establish a new court system. The state radio also said that Nay Min, a 42-year-old lawyer, had been arrested and charged with feeding falsehoods to the British Broadcasting Corp.
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NEWS
August 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Burma's leading dissident and about 1,700 other anti-government protesters were released by the government Thursday as thousands more rallied to demand immediate democracy, rejecting the president's proposal to consider multiparty rule. Aung Gyi left Insein Jail and later told a quickly organized rally of about 200,000 that an interim government must be formed to lead the nation to democracy.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
"We have to take this step by step," Aung San Suu Kyi said, explaining the fragile condition of the Burmese opposition, which just two weeks ago appeared to have a despotic government on the run. At that time, Aung San Suu Kyi--the daughter of a Burmese independence leader--and two former generals, each with a separate following, were rejecting a civilian president's promise of democratic elections. No deal, they said, unless the vote is carried out under a nonpartisan interim regime.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Tens of thousands of Burmese marched in the capital of Rangoon and more than a dozen other cities Monday to protest the government of President Sein Lwin, diplomats and media reports said. At least eight people were killed. Rangoon radio, monitored in Bangkok, reported "mass demonstrations" in areas ranging from Moulmein on the southern coast to Taunggyi in the wild, mountainous area of the Shan states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1988 | From Reuters
Burma announced Tuesday that, in the wake of anti-government rioting in which hundreds were arrested, all courts will be closed until April. The military council that seized power Sept. 18 brutally crushed dissent, abolished the old ruling party and judiciary and has attempted to establish a new court system. The state radio also said that Nay Min, a 42-year-old lawyer, had been arrested and charged with feeding falsehoods to the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Three opposition leaders declared Friday that they will form a united front to oppose the military government of Gen. Saw Maung, which took power last weekend. The announcement marked the first formal attempt by Aung Gyi, Tin Oo and Aung San Suu Kyi to unite the numerous student, worker and other groups seeking an end to 26 years of autocratic military rule and ruinous economic policies.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
"We have to take this step by step," Aung San Suu Kyi said, explaining the fragile condition of the Burmese opposition, which just two weeks ago appeared to have a despotic government on the run. At that time, Aung San Suu Kyi--the daughter of a Burmese independence leader--and two former generals, each with a separate following, were rejecting a civilian president's promise of democratic elections. No deal, they said, unless the vote is carried out under a nonpartisan interim regime.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Security forces in Burma killed at least 36 demonstrators Tuesday as violent anti-government protests mounted nationwide in the most direct, sustained challenge to more than a quarter-century of military rule. In the capital of Rangoon, where students marched in defiance of military patrols operating under martial law, five demonstrators were shot to death, the official Radio Rangoon reported.
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The grudging concessions of Burma's longtime rulers, blistered by the flames of a brush-fire rebellion, come intermittently over official Rangoon Radio. A referendum on multi-party politics is promised; dissidents and demonstrators arrested in the bloody days of early August are released; unions of university students will be legalized again. The Burma Socialist Program Party, the vehicle of former Gen. Ne Win's erratic and iron-fisted control of the country, is trying to buy time.
NEWS
September 28, 1988
Burmese fleeing to frontier areas said they saw troops execute anti-government protesters. Western diplomats in Rangoon say there are increasing reports of executions of lower-level anti-government leaders, but they have yet to be confirmed. The opposition League for Democracy accused Burma's military regime of torture, killings and illegal arrests, and demanded that they stop.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Three opposition leaders declared Friday that they will form a united front to oppose the military government of Gen. Saw Maung, which took power last weekend. The announcement marked the first formal attempt by Aung Gyi, Tin Oo and Aung San Suu Kyi to unite the numerous student, worker and other groups seeking an end to 26 years of autocratic military rule and ruinous economic policies.
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The grudging concessions of Burma's longtime rulers, blistered by the flames of a brush-fire rebellion, come intermittently over official Rangoon Radio. A referendum on multi-party politics is promised; dissidents and demonstrators arrested in the bloody days of early August are released; unions of university students will be legalized again. The Burma Socialist Program Party, the vehicle of former Gen. Ne Win's erratic and iron-fisted control of the country, is trying to buy time.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Burma's leading dissident and about 1,700 other anti-government protesters were released by the government Thursday as thousands more rallied to demand immediate democracy, rejecting the president's proposal to consider multiparty rule. Aung Gyi left Insein Jail and later told a quickly organized rally of about 200,000 that an interim government must be formed to lead the nation to democracy.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Security forces in Burma killed at least 36 demonstrators Tuesday as violent anti-government protests mounted nationwide in the most direct, sustained challenge to more than a quarter-century of military rule. In the capital of Rangoon, where students marched in defiance of military patrols operating under martial law, five demonstrators were shot to death, the official Radio Rangoon reported.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Tens of thousands of Burmese marched in the capital of Rangoon and more than a dozen other cities Monday to protest the government of President Sein Lwin, diplomats and media reports said. At least eight people were killed. Rangoon radio, monitored in Bangkok, reported "mass demonstrations" in areas ranging from Moulmein on the southern coast to Taunggyi in the wild, mountainous area of the Shan states.
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