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Dissidents China

NEWS
December 22, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three dissidents seeking to establish an opposition party have been convicted and given harsh prison sentences in trials that drew a clear line separating acceptable discourse about political reform from what the Communist leadership regards as subversion. At its essence, the distinction appears to be between talking and doing.
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NEWS
December 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Underscoring the government's resolve to crush dissent, a Chinese court today sentenced a prominent dissident to 13 years in prison, accusing him of trying to subvert state power by organizing an opposition party, a human rights group said. Xu Wenli's lawyer informed the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China about the harsh sentence, said the center's director, Lu Siqing.
NEWS
December 21, 1998
A prominent Chinese labor leader and his family arrived in the United States on Sunday night, the latest of a number of dissidents freed into exile on medical parole by the Beijing government in the last year. Liu Nianchun, 50, his wife, Chu Halin, and their 11-year-old daughter flew into New York from China via Vancouver, Canada, on the eve of a trial in China of another dissident trying to establish an opposition group to the Communist Party government.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
China released an ailing labor rights campaigner from a prison work camp today and immediately sent him into exile in the United States, a human rights group reported. Liu Nianchun's release contrasted with a relentless 3-week-old crackdown against dissidents trying to form an opposition political party. A leading organizer of the China Democracy Party, Xu Wenli, is scheduled to go on trial for subversion Monday.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese President Jiang Zemin on Friday applauded 20 years of economic reforms that have pulled millions of his people out of poverty, but he vowed that China will never adopt a Western-style democratic political system. Addressing an assembly of the Communist Party elite here in the capital, Jiang declared that the present system "must not be shaken, weakened or discarded." He added that "the Western mode of political systems must never be copied."
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid tightened security and heightened speculation over the future of political reform here, China put two of its best-known dissidents on trial Thursday for "inciting subversion" through their efforts to form an opposition party to the ruling Communist regime. The proceedings are the highest-profile political trials in the world's most populous nation since those after the crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square 9 1/2 years ago.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Police have detained two more Chinese dissidents, and the student author of a petition demanding the release of a pro-democracy leader charged with subversion has disappeared, a human rights group said Sunday. The new detentions bring to as many as 15 the number of people picked up by police during a 2-week-old crackdown on the would-be China Democracy Party.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police detained two more Chinese democracy activists as part of a crackdown against a planned opposition party, a rights group reported. Officers raided the homes of Zhang Baoqin and Liu Xianbin, bringing to at least 10 the number of China Democracy Party members taken into custody. While most have been released, the three leading organizers of the budding opposition party are being held, accused of endangering national security.
NEWS
December 5, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to extend political control into cyberspace, Chinese authorities put a young software entrepreneur on trial here Friday on charges that he tried to undermine the state through the Internet, the first trial of a "cyberdissident" in China. Lin Hai, 30, is accused of inciting subversion by providing 30,000 Chinese e-mail addresses to "hostile foreign organizations," a charge that could bring a maximum penalty of life in prison. Lin pleaded not guilty.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Two dissidents arrested this week are suspected of endangering national security, China's government said in the clearest sign yet that it intends to block their campaign to form an opposition party. Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhu Bangzao refused to say how Xu Wenli and Qin Yongmin endangered the state or to specify what laws they broke. Wang Youcai, a third activist in the campaign to set up the China Democracy Party, has been in custody for a month.
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