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Dissidents China

NEWS
January 4, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The land that brought the world the Great Wall has built a new barrier on its ultimate frontier. This shield, like its predecessor, is designed to repel invaders and protect China from their foreign ideas. Dubbed "the Great Chinese Firewall," it is a series of Internet blocks and filters meant to stop Chinese citizens from seeing online news and opinions that differ from the government's political line.
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NEWS
December 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In the first official statement on the whereabouts of two U.S.-based Chinese dissidents who slipped back into China, the Foreign Ministry said the two had been caught and sentenced to three years of forced labor, the maximum sentence police can order without a trial. The ministry said police arrested Zhang Lin and Wei Quanbao on Nov. 12 in the southern city of Guangzhou in a barbershop operating as a brothel. The two sneaked back into China seven weeks ago.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
Broadening a crackdown on dissent, China tried and sentenced a labor activist Sunday to 10 years in prison for telling a U.S. government-funded radio network about farmers' protests, his wife said. Zhang Shanguang was the fourth dissident given a lengthy jail term in a week. He was sentenced following a brief closed-door hearing at a court in Huaihua City in southern China's Hunan province, his wife, Hou Xuezhu, said.
NEWS
December 27, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after President Clinton completed a spectacular summit with China's rulers that included a first-ever televised debate with Communist Party leader Jiang Zemin over the pace of democratic reforms, Beijing and Washington are increasingly at odds over crucial differences of policy. China has mounted an aggressive political crackdown that appears in stark defiance of American demands--and China's own pledges--to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms.
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three dissidents seeking to establish an opposition party have been convicted and given harsh prison sentences in trials that drew a clear line separating acceptable discourse about political reform from what the Communist leadership regards as subversion. At its essence, the distinction appears to be between talking and doing.
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Underscoring the government's resolve to crush dissent, a Chinese court today sentenced a prominent dissident to 13 years in prison, accusing him of trying to subvert state power by organizing an opposition party, a human rights group said. Xu Wenli's lawyer informed the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China about the harsh sentence, said the center's director, Lu Siqing.
NEWS
December 21, 1998
A prominent Chinese labor leader and his family arrived in the United States on Sunday night, the latest of a number of dissidents freed into exile on medical parole by the Beijing government in the last year. Liu Nianchun, 50, his wife, Chu Halin, and their 11-year-old daughter flew into New York from China via Vancouver, Canada, on the eve of a trial in China of another dissident trying to establish an opposition group to the Communist Party government.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
China released an ailing labor rights campaigner from a prison work camp today and immediately sent him into exile in the United States, a human rights group reported. Liu Nianchun's release contrasted with a relentless 3-week-old crackdown against dissidents trying to form an opposition political party. A leading organizer of the China Democracy Party, Xu Wenli, is scheduled to go on trial for subversion Monday.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese President Jiang Zemin on Friday applauded 20 years of economic reforms that have pulled millions of his people out of poverty, but he vowed that China will never adopt a Western-style democratic political system. Addressing an assembly of the Communist Party elite here in the capital, Jiang declared that the present system "must not be shaken, weakened or discarded." He added that "the Western mode of political systems must never be copied."
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid tightened security and heightened speculation over the future of political reform here, China put two of its best-known dissidents on trial Thursday for "inciting subversion" through their efforts to form an opposition party to the ruling Communist regime. The proceedings are the highest-profile political trials in the world's most populous nation since those after the crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square 9 1/2 years ago.
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