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Dissidents China

NEWS
December 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
A group of Chinese democracy activists denounced the arrest of three prominent Chinese dissidents, accusing the Beijing government in an open letter Wednesday of failing to comply with U.N. human rights treaties it has signed over the past year. The letter, signed by 190 democracy activists, called for the release of Xu Wenli, Qin Yongmin and Wang Youcai--all outspoken organizers in a campaign to establish an opposition party that would challenge the Communist Party's monopoly on power.
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NEWS
December 2, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a wide-reaching crackdown on one of China's first opposition parties, police in three cities have detained 10 of its leaders, and the tearful wife of one of the activists accused the government Tuesday of "cheating its people and cheating the world."
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese authorities have detained two dissidents and placed a third under surveillance in a widening police sweep against members of a would-be opposition party, rights groups reported. Two of the dissidents--Xie Wanjun and Liu Lianjun--reported receiving encouraging signals from the government earlier this month about setting up the China Democracy Party. But last week, police began detaining people connected to the party.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
Chinese police interrogated three dissidents in separate, three-hour sessions and warned them not to try to set up an opposition political party, one of those interrogated said today. Ren Wanding, one of the dissident community's most prominent figures, said his Thursday night detention and questioning persuaded him to give up plans to register the China Democracy Party's Beijing branch. Police "told me, 'Now we're still under the Communist Party's leadership.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Adidas-Salomon was accused in a $1.2-billion lawsuit filed by Chinese political dissidents of using slave labor in China to make World Cup '98 soccer balls. The lawsuit on behalf of current and former prisoners of Chinese work camps comes as the German company is trying to determine who was responsible for what it called possible unauthorized soccer ball production by political prisoners in China.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police have detained four more dissidents, bringing to 21 the number arrested in the last two weeks, a monitoring group said. Five police officers went to Jin Jiwu's house in southern Hunan province Friday night, arresting him and three other dissidents meeting there, the Information Center of Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China said.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | Associated Press
A Chinese dissident detained nearly seven weeks ago has been formally charged and barred from seeing his lawyer, a group of exiled democracy campaigners said Friday. Although Chen Zengxiang's family hired a lawyer at the direction of authorities, he has not been allowed to see Chen because police said the case "touched on state secrets," the New York-based Chinese Democratic Justice Party said.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only a day after President Clinton's news conference with his Chinese counterpart seemed to point to a new era of openness here, security officials Sunday came to the home of a former senior Communist Party official jailed during the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown and sternly warned him to keep his mouth shut.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Family members of dissident Wang Dan, who recently was released into exile from a Chinese prison, have been granted passports and plan to visit the United States, the relatives said Sunday. Wang's mother, Wang Lingyun, had earlier said she planned to visit her son once she had permission to go. Now that she and her husband have acquired passports, they need only U.S. visas to visit.
SPORTS
June 13, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As millions of fans cheered the kickoff of the World Cup, one man was crying foul. Bao Ge, a Chinese dissident who was released from prison a year ago, alleges that he was forced to stitch together Adidas World Cup '98 soccer balls while in a labor education camp. Bao filed a lawsuit against Adidas last week claiming that the company was liable for the prisoners' suffering. Adidas denies that the balls were theirs.
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