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Dissidents Czechoslovakia

NEWS
December 4, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The revolution is a little more tense in the Czechoslovak provinces than it is in Prague. Consider, for example, the sign posted near the door of a neighborhood Pribram restaurant over the weekend. "Attention!" it read. "Civic Forum was recognized by the government as an equal partner in conducting all social dialogue. The removing of posters and declarations of the Civic Forum is a sabotage of this dialogue."
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NEWS
December 4, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the sense of freedom that has come to Czechoslovakia during the last two weeks, a new political statement has appeared in the form of a flashy red, white and blue campaign button. In addition to the Czechoslovak national colors, the button carries the name of opposition leader Vaclav Havel and the words "Havel for President." The button reflects the popularity of the most prominent figure in the country's opposition movement, but it falls short of reality.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jaroslav Hutka just didn't fit in after the Prague Spring. Not that he was a political dissident, at least not at first. But the songs he wrote and sang were a bit unorthodox. And with his long hair and beard, he was different from the humorless men who took power in Czechoslovakia after the reform movement of 1968 was crushed. "It was clear to them that I was not one of them," he said Thursday over the kind of lunch that only a few weeks ago he thought he would never have again.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only requirement for Civic Forum membership, the opposition group's spokesman, Jiri Dienstbier, said the other day, is a desire to be rid of the constitutional "leading role" of any political party. By that standard, the entire, Communist-dominated Czechoslovak Parliament became eligible Wednesday, when it voted unanimously to amend this country's basic law to eliminate the controversial clause that for 41 years has given the Communists a monopoly on power.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weekends are sacred in Czechoslovakia, especially for the privileged. So as the sun turned the few wispy clouds over Prague to pink on the crisp autumn Friday afternoon of Nov. 17, Communist Party leader Milos Jakes and most other members of the Politburo left for their country homes. According to a source close to the party hierarchy, there had been an argument in the Politburo earlier in the week over whether to sanction a student demonstration that Friday afternoon.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a playwright and a former Communist Party leader are the George Washington and Benjamin Franklin of the Czechoslovak revolution, then a collection of technicians, drivers and clerks who call themselves "the Garage Men" are its Paul Revere.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a two-hour anti-government general strike that brought much of the country's industry to a standstill, the opposition group Civic Forum on Monday effectively declared victory in the initial phase of its struggle to end repressive rule in Czechoslovakia. The victory claim came on the eve of Civic Forum's first substantive talks with Prime Minister Ladislav Adamec--talks that could lead to the dismantling of communism's 41-year-long monopoly of power.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years there was only darkness. The brief dawn of reform that came with Alexander Dubcek in the 1968 "Prague Spring" was crushed so completely by the repressive regime installed in its aftermath that for seven years, no opposition existed. A regime filled with incompetents and characterized by crudeness managed to purge its opponents with undisputed efficiency.
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The father of Soviet communism, V. I. Lenin, once remarked that Germans are so obedient that if a mob of them ever tried to storm a railroad station, they'd all buy tickets first. But if obedience characterizes the Germans, it is a remarkable civility that characterizes the Czechoslovaks. For amid all the turmoil and excitement of Czechoslovakia's recent political reawakening, those pressing for change have maintained an unusual sense of consideration for their fellow citizens.
NEWS
November 23, 1989
Alexander Dubcek, the Czechoslovak reformer whose voice is being heard again after years in the political wilderness, had a career that led from obscurity to the heights of power and then down to disgrace.
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