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Dissidents Panama

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March 17, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Rebellious officers in Panama's Defense Forces tried and failed early Wednesday to carry out a coup d'etat against military strongman Manuel A. Noriega, Panamanian military officials said. Five accused plotters, including the military chief of Panama's police force, were arrested, according to a military statement. Not long after gunfire echoed through Gen.
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NEWS
October 8, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writers
As Radio Exitosa broadcast that rebel officers had ousted Gen. Manuel A. Noriega last week, cheers erupted from the Ministry of Health. Jubilant Treasury employees began to celebrate, and workers at the National Casinos headquarters took the dictator's portrait off the wall. "There were content faces in all of the ministries," said Justice Minister Olmedo Miranda. "When our enemies thought the movement had triumphed, they showed their euphoria."
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NEWS
August 6, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Five of six businessmen leading a fight to oust Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega went into hiding Wednesday after the government issued an order for their arrest for conspiring to overthrow the government. The mayor of Panama City, meanwhile, banned a rally that the opposition National Civic Crusade had scheduled for today and outlawed car caravans, one of the middle- and upper-class Crusade's principal forms of protest against the government. Although civilian President Eric A.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writers
Four months after its apparent electoral triumph was annulled, Panama's civic opposition movement appeared Friday to have been driven into a passive and insignificant role by the new turmoil shaking military dictator Manuel A. Noriega. Guillermo Endara, declared by international observers to be the winner over Noriega's candidate in last May's presidential election, took refuge in the Vatican Embassy after government agents evicted him from his party headquarters Thursday night.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The military-dominated government of Panama opened talks Monday aimed at ending the country's political stalemate, but only supporters of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega showed up. Called a "national dialogue" by Noriega's government, but rejected as "a ploy to buy time" by one opposition leader, the talks began as Panama limped back to activity after a long Easter holiday and a series of strikes that had shut down most commerce for two weeks.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
Panamanian opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon and eight companions were freed in the provincial capital of Santiago after being jailed for 20 hours. They were arrested Sunday on charges of urging citizens not to pay taxes as part of the effort to topple strongman Manuel A. Noriega. The nation's attorney general said the nine still face charges of "crimes against the state . . . and the national economy."
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
When an opposition political movement is run by the Chamber of Commerce, it makes sense to frame questions about its future in business terms: How much are Panama's businessmen willing to invest in their campaign to oust the country's strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega? Under the banner of the National Civic Crusade, businessmen have organized car caravans through the city's financial district, sponsored demonstrations and closed their doors--tactics that have cost them money.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | From Reuters
About 3,000 opposition supporters, chanting slogans against Panama's strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, marched through the streets of Panama City on Thursday to commemorate the death of a political leader. It was the first opposition march here since shortly after general elections were annulled in May amid allegations of vote-rigging by supporters of Noriega, the country's army chief and de facto ruler.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | United Press International
A retired colonel arrested when troops stormed his home has no evidence to support accusations that Panama's military strongman masterminded assassinations and rigged elections, sources in the assistant prosecutor's office said Tuesday. Retired Col. Roberto Diaz Herrera, Panama's former No. 2 military man, was said to be in good health despite a two-hour gunfight early Monday between people at his residence and security forces.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's deposed president, Eric A. Delvalle, chided the Reagan Administration on Friday for its tactics in trying to remove Gen. Manuel A. Noriega from power and said that next time Washington should listen to Panama's civilian opposition and not go it alone. "From the beginning," Delvalle told reporters, "I maintained that a mistake was being committed in the negotiations with Gen.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
In an 18th-floor mid-Manhattan hotel room, Guillermo (Billy) Ford, the opposition vice president-elect of Panama, sat on a white cloth couch, chain-smoking and placing calls home Tuesday to members of his political party. He was anxiously trying to find out if the military coup against Gen. Manuel A. Noriega had succeeded. "We've been fighting this system for the last 21 years, and this monster for the last two years," Ford said, his tie loosened, uneaten food from room service on a nearby cart.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
Panamanian opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon and eight companions were freed in the provincial capital of Santiago after being jailed for 20 hours. They were arrested Sunday on charges of urging citizens not to pay taxes as part of the effort to topple strongman Manuel A. Noriega. The nation's attorney general said the nine still face charges of "crimes against the state . . . and the national economy."
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon, a former opposition candidate for vice president, and eight supporters were reportedly arrested Sunday by the Panamanian police. The Civic Democratic Opposition Alliance said the nine members of the Christian Democratic Party were arrested as they toured the countryside campaigning for the ouster of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, the country's military strongman.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | From Reuters
About 3,000 opposition supporters, chanting slogans against Panama's strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, marched through the streets of Panama City on Thursday to commemorate the death of a political leader. It was the first opposition march here since shortly after general elections were annulled in May amid allegations of vote-rigging by supporters of Noriega, the country's army chief and de facto ruler.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's deposed president, Eric A. Delvalle, chided the Reagan Administration on Friday for its tactics in trying to remove Gen. Manuel A. Noriega from power and said that next time Washington should listen to Panama's civilian opposition and not go it alone. "From the beginning," Delvalle told reporters, "I maintained that a mistake was being committed in the negotiations with Gen.
NEWS
May 8, 1988
A Panamanian dissident said he was forced to board a plane to Miami after being arrested and beaten. Ivan Romero, secretary general of the Christian Democratic Party, was detained in Panama after visiting the United States, said Perry Rivkind, local director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. "They apparently interpreted something he said in New York as unflattering to Gen. (Manuel A. ) Noriega," Rivkind said.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | Associated Press
American Roman Catholic bishops have lent their moral support to Panama's Archbishop Marcos G. McGrath in his effort to mediate talks between the Panamanian government and the opposition, which has been trying to oust Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. "The voice of the church in Panama has been clear and consistent, denouncing the instances of civic corruption and state violence that have tragically become so much a part of recent news reports," Archbishop John L.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's president-in-hiding, Eric A. Delvalle, has received promises from the United States of new steps to speed the ouster of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, Delvalle's wife said Wednesday. The assurances have persuaded Delvalle to continue backing efforts to bring down the military strongman, Mariela Delvalle said. Her husband has met with U.S. officials in recent days, she added. "Everything is moving as it should, in its rightful time, " she quoted her husband as saying.
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